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HISTORICAL    RECORDS 


OF    THE 


79-m    QUEEN'S    OWN 


CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS 


antr  (Kiritsft  1m 


CAPTAIN   T.    A.    MACKENZIE, 
LIEUTENANT   AND   ADJUTANT   J.   S.    EWART, 

AND 

LIEUTENANT   C.    FINDLAY, 
FROM    THE    ORDERLY    ROOM    RECORDS. 


HAMILTON,    ADAMS   &   Co.,    32   PATERNOSTER   Row. 

JDebonport  \ 
A.    H.    SWISS,    111    &   112   FOUE   ,STRSET.; 

1887. 


Ms 


PRINTED  AT  THE 

"  BREMNER  "  PRINTING  WORKS, 

DEVOXPORT. 


HENRY  MORSE  STETHEMS 


ILLUSTRATIONS. 


THE  PHOTOGRAVURES 

are  by  the  London  Typographic  Etching  Company,  from 
Photographs  and  Engravings  kindly  lent  by  the  Officers'  and 
Sergeants'  Messes  and  various  Officers  of  the  Regiment.  The 
Photogravure  of  the  Uniform  Levee  Dress,  1835,  is  from  a 
Photograph  of  Lieutenant  Lumsden,  dressed  in  the  uniform 
belonging  to  the  late  Major  W.  A.  Riach. 


CONTENTS. 


PAGK 

PREFACE          vii 

1793— RAISING  THE  REGIMENT        1 

1801— EGYPTIAN  CAMPAIGN        16 

1808— PENINSULAR  CAMPAIGN         ..  27 

1815— WATERLOO  CAMPAIGN        ..         54 

1840— GIBRALTAR          96 

1848— CANADA         98 

1854— CRIMEAN  CAMPAIGN     103 

1857— INDIAN  MUTINY      128 

1872— HOME        150 

1879— GIBRALTAR     ...        ...         ..         ...  161 

1882— EGYPTIAN  CAMPAIGN 166 

1884— NILE  EXPEDITION              ...        .'.         ...  181 

1885— SOUDAN  CAMPAIGN      183 

SERVICES  OF  THE  OFFICERS        203 

SERVICES  OF  THE  WARRANT  OFFICERS  ETC.        ....  291 

APPENDIX  307 


LIST     OF     ILLUSTRATIONS, 


SIR  JOHN  DOUGLAS     Frontispiece 

REGIMENTAL  COLOUR  To  face 

SIR  NEIL  DOUGLAS To  face       56 

LA    BELLE    ALLIANCE  :     WHERE    THE    REGIMENT 

BIVOUACKED  AFTER  THE  BATTLE  OF  WATERLOO  ..  ,,  58 

SIR  RONALD  FERGUSON        ,,  86 

ILLUSTRATION  OF  LEVEE  DRESS     ,,  94 

SIR  RICHARD  TAYLOR           ,,  130 

COLOURS  PRESENTED  BY  THE  QUEEN       ,,  152 

GENERAL  MILLER        ,,  154 

COLONEL  CUMING        ,,  160 

COLONEL  LEITH           ,  172 

KOSHEH  FORT ,,  186 

REPRESENTATIVE  GROUP  OF  CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS  196 


PREFACE. 


WANT  has  long  been  felt  in  the  Regiment  for 
some  complete  history  of  the  79th  Cameron 
Highlanders  down  to  the  present  time,  and, 
at  the  request  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett,  D-S.O., 
and  the  officers  of  the  Regiment  a  committee,  con- 
sisting of  Captain  T.  A.  Mackenzie,  Lieutenant  and 
Adjutant  J.  S.  Ewart,  and  Lieutenant  C.  Findlay, 
undertook  to  complete  Captain  Jameson's  Historical 
Record  down  to  the  present  date. 

The  Committee,  fully  sensible  of  their  own  short- 
comings and  unfitness  for  the  task,  have  attempted 
very  little  original  composition,  but  have  merely 
endeavoured  to  string  together,  into  a  consecutive 
narrative,  the  various  books  and  manuscripts  in 
possession  of  the  Orderly  Room. 

The  Records,  as  far  as  the  close  of  the  Crimean 
War,  are,  with  a  few  slight  additions,  copied  entirely 
from  Captain  Jameson's  book,  which  is  the  foundation 
of  the  present  work. 

The  Officers  of  the  Regiment  are  much  indebted 
to  Mr.  Mackenzie  for  his  kindness  in  permitting  them 
to  use  the  valuable  information  contained  in  his 
"  History  of  the  Camerons"  from  which  most  of  the 
details  of  the  early  life  of  Sir  Alan  Cameron  are 
taken, 


PREFACE. 


The  List  of  Officers,  Non-commissioned  Officers, 
and  Men  who  fought  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo  is 
taken  from  the  old  Waterloo  Medal  Roll,  which  is 
still  in  possession  of  the  Regiment. 

The  manuscript  Records  kept  during  the  Indian 
Mutiny  are  extremely  meagre,  and  the  Committee 
have  to  thank  Quarter-Master  Sergeant  Mackenzie, 
late  paymaster-sergeant  of  the  regiment,  for  the  details 
which  they  have  been  able  to  publish. 

The  account  of  the  Campaign  in  Egpyt  in  1882  is 
copied  from  Major  Baynes'  "  Narrative  of  the  part 
taken  by  the  jqth  in  the  Egyptian  Campaign  of  1882'' 

The  Services  of  the  Officers  are  taken  from  the 
record  of  service  books  in  the  Orderly  Room,  "  H  art's 
Army  Lists"  and  from  "  Smith's  List  of  Officers  of 
the  jqth"  and  are  probably  nearly  complete,  but  it  is 
a  subject  of  great  regret  that  the  services  of  so  few  of 
the  many  distinguished  non-commissioned  officers  who 
have  been  in  the  regiment  are  procurable. 

The  Committee  are  well  aware  that  in  a  work  of 
this  description  there  must  be  many  errors  and  inac- 
curacies, but  they  feel  sure  that  all  members  of  the 
regiment,  past  and  present,  will  regard  their  efforts 
leniently. 

The  publication  of  the  book  has  been  undertaken 
by  Mr.  A.  H.  Swiss,  of  Devonport,  who  has  spared 
no  pains  to  meet  the  wishes  of  the  officers  and  to 
produce  a  book  worthy  of  the  regiment. 


HISTORICAL   RECORDS 


OF  THE 


79th  CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS. 


1793. 

|HE  79th  Regiment  of  Foot  (or  Cameron  Highlanders) 
bears  on  its  colours  the  following  inscriptions  and  device 
in  commemoration  of  its  services  : — "  Egmont-op-Zee," 
"Egypt,"  with  the  Sphinx,  "  Fuentes  d'Onor,"  "Salamanca," 
"  Pyrenees, "  "  Nivelle, "  "  Nive,  "  "  Toulouse,  "  "  Peninsula,  " 
•'Waterloo,"  "Alma,"  "Sevastopol,"  "  Lucknow,"  "Egypt,  1882," 
" Tel-el-Kebir,"  "Nile,  1884-5." 

At  a  time  so  highly  fraught  with  momentous  events  as  the  early 
part  of  the  long  and  sanguinary  wars  of  the  French  Revolution, 
the  British  Ministry  found  itself  imperatively  called  upon  to  make 
a  large  increase  to  the  standing  army  of  the  country  with  the  view 
of  repelling  the  aggressions  of  revolutionised  and  republican  France. 
Along  with  many  other  levies  made  about  the  same  time,  a  letter 
of  service,  dated  17th  August,  1793,  was  granted  to  Alan  Cameron, 
Esq.,  of  Erracht,  in  the  county  of  Inverness,  for  the  purpose  of 
raising  a  Highland  regiment  of  foot,  to  be  numbered  79,  and 
designated  the  "  Cameronian  Volunteers."  This  designation  was 
subsequently  changed  to  "  Cameron  Highlanders,"  "  Cameronian  " 
being  a  name  applied  to  a  religious  sect  of  Lowlanders.  Mr. 
Cameron  received  the  commission  of  major  in  the  corps  about  to  be 
raised,  together  with  the  local  rank  of  commandant  thereof;  and  from 

B 


4  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

repeal  of  the  statute  prohibiting  the  wearing  of  the  Highland  dress, 
which  had  been  in  force  since  1745. 

On  the  17th  August,  1793,  in  answer  to  several  applications  he  had 
made,  he  received  the  following  letter  of  service  to  raise  a  Highland 
regiment  — 


0f   zttbitt   f0r  raising  tlj* 
lUgitrant. 

"  War  Office,  17th  August,  1793. 
"  SIR, 

"  I  am  commanded  to  acquaint  you  that  His  Majesty 
approves  of  your  raising  a  Highland  Regiment  of  foot,  without  any 
allowance  of  levy  money,  to  be  completed  within  three  months,  upon 
the  following  terms,  viz  :  — 

"  The  corps  is  to  consist  of  one  company  of  Grenadiers,  one  of 
light  infantry,  and  eight  battalion  companies. 

"The  Grenadier  company  is  to  consist  of  one  captain,  two 
lieutenants,  three  sergeants,  three  corporals,  two  drummers,  two  pipers, 
and  fifty-seven  private  men  ;  the  light  infantry  company  of  one 
captain,  two  lieutenants,  three  sergeants,  three  corporals,  two  drum- 
mers, and  fifty-seven  private  men  ;  and  each  battalion  company 
of  one  captain,  one  lieutenant,  one  ensign,  three  sergeants,  three 
corporals,  two  drummers,  and  fifty-seven  private  men,  together  with 
the  usual  staff  officers,  and  with  a  sergeant-major  and  quarter-master- 
sergeant,  exclusive  of  the  sergeants  above  specified. 

"  The  captain-lieutenant  is,  as  usual,  included  in  the  number  of 
lieutenants  above  mentioned. 

"  The  corps  is  to  have  one  major  with  a  company,  and  is  to  be 
under  your  command  as  major  with  a  company. 

"  The  pay  of  the  officers  is  to  commence  from  the  dates  of  their 
commissions,  and  that  of  the  non-commissioned  officers  from  the 
dates  of  their  attestations. 

"  All  the  officers,  the  ensigns  and  staff  officers  excepted,  are  to  be 
appointed  from  the  half  pay,  according  to  their  present  ranks  ;  and 
you  will  be  pleased  to  transmit  to  Lord  Amherst  the  names  of  the 
gentlemen  whose  appointment  to  your  regiment  you  conceive  will 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  5 

essentially  conduce  to  the  more  speedy  completion  of  the  corps, 
taking  care,  however,  to  recommend  such  officers  only  as  have  not 
taken  any  difference  on  their  being  placed  on  half  pay,  and  that  the 
gentlemen  recommended  for  ensigncies  are  upwards  of  sixteen  years 
of  age. 

"  In  case  the  corps  should  be  reduced  after  it  has  been  once 
established,  the  officers  will  be  entitled  to  half  pay. 

"  No  man  is  to  be  enlisted  above  thirty-five  years  of  age,  nor  under 
five  feet  five  inches  high.  Well  made  growing  lads  between  sixteen 
and  eighteen  years  of  age  may  be  taken  at  five  feet  four  inches. 

"  The  recruits  are  to  be  engaged  without  limitation  as  to  the  period 
or  place  of  their  service,  but  they  are  not  to  be  drafted  into  any  other 
regiment,  and  whenever  the  reduction  is  to  take  place  they  shall  be 
marched  into  their  own  country  in  a  corps,  and  disembodied  therein. 

"  The  non-commissioned  officers  and  privates  are  to  be  inspected 
by  a  general  officer,  who  will  reject  all  such  as  are  unfit  for  service 
or  not  enlisted  in  conformity  to  the  terms  of  this  letter. 

"  When  established  the  regiment  is  to  be  called  the  Seventy-Ninth, 
or  Cameronian  Volunteers. 

"  In  the  execution  of  this  service  I  take  leave  to  assure  you  of 
every  assistance  which  my  office  can  afford. 
"  I  have  the  honour  to  be, 
"  Sir, 

"  Your  most  obedient  servant, 

(Signed)  "  GEORGE  YONGE." 

"  To  Alan  Cameron,  Esq." 

On  receipt  of  this  communication  Major  Cameron  at  once  wrote 
to  his  father-in-law,  Mr.  Phillips,  and  was  assured  by  him  that  the 
necessary  funds  could  be  placed  at  his  disposal.  This  relieved  him 
from  his  principal  difficulty.  The  next  consideration  was  how  far  it 
would  be  prudent  to  make  the  recruiting  ground  his  own  native 
district  of  Lochaber,  remembering  how  he  had  left  it  as  a  fugitive 
from  the  vengeance  of  a  considerable  portion  of  its  inhabitants.  He 
decided  to  send  several  copies  of  the  London  Gazette,  containing  his 
authority  to  raise  a  Highland  Regiment,  to  his  brother  Ewen,  who  was 


6 


HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 


living  in  Lochaber,  stating  in  a  letter  to  him,  "  having  been  favoured 
with  the  honour  of  embodying  a  Highland  Regiment  for  His 
Majesty's  service,  where  could  I  go  but  to  my  own  native  Lochaber, 
and  with  that  desire  I  have  decided  on  appealing  to  their  forgiveness 
of  byegone  events,  and  their  loyalty  to  the  Sovereign  in  his  present 
exigencies.  The  few  commissions  at  my  disposal  shall  be  offered  to 
the  relatives  of  the  gentleman  whose  life  was  unfortunately  sacrificed 
by  my  hand." 

His  brother  Ewen  circulated  copies  of  the  Gazette  and  this  letter 
as  best  he  could,  but  with  such  effect  that,  when  Major  Cameron 
arrived  in  Lochaber,  he  had  already  enlisted  a  company. 

Thus  the  credit  of  raising  the  nucleus  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
rests  with  Ewen  Cameron.  For  this  service  his  brother  obtained  for 
him  a  commission  as  captain  and  recruiting  officer  of  the  regiment  in 
Lochaber. 

Major  Cameron's  first  duty,  imposed  upon  him  by  his  letter  of 
service,  was  to  select  and  recommend  the  officers  from  the  half  pay 
list  to  be  associated  with  him  in  raising  the  regiment.  In  the 
disposition  of  these  he  was  to  a  certain  extent  under  the  guidance 
of  his  own  inclination  to  have  as  many  as  he  could  of  his  old 
American  brother  officers  with  him.  The  following  list  of  officers 
selected  was  duly  submitted  to  the  War  office  and  approved  : — 


Rank. 

Name. 

Date  of  Appointment. 

Major  Commandant    .. 

Alan  Cameron     ... 

August  17th,  1793 

Major    

George  Rowley    ... 

April   16th,     1794 

Captain 

Neil  Campbell      

August  17th,  1793 

» 

Patrick  McDowall 

18th,  1793 

,, 

Donald  Cameron 

19th,  1793 

„ 

George  Carnegie  ... 

20th,  1793 

Captain-Lieutenant     \ 
and  Captain         ...  / 

Archibald  McLean 

17th,  1793 

Lieutenant 

Archibald  McLean 

17th,  1793 

j,                ... 

Alexander  McDonnell     .  .  . 

18th,  1793 

» 

Duncan  Stewart  ... 

19th,  1793 

,,                ... 

John  Urquhart    ... 

20th,  1793 

79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


Rank. 

Name. 

Date  of  Appointment. 

Lieutenant       

Colin  McLean 

January  29th,  1794 

>» 

Joseph  Dover 

March  26th,    1794 

„ 

Charles  Me  Vicar  

„       27th,    1794 

Ensign    

Neil  Campbell     

August  17th,  1793 

3> 

Gordon  Cameron  

18th,  1793 

,, 

Archibald  McDonnell 

19th,  1793 

,, 

Archibald  Campbell 

20th,  1793 

., 

Donald  McLean  ... 

21st,  1793 

,, 

Archibald  Cameron 

22nd,  1793 

,, 

Alexander  Grant... 

23rd,  1793 

,, 

William  Graham... 

24th,  1793 

Chaplain 

Thomas  Thompson 

17th,  1793 

Adjutant 

Archibald  McLean 

»                » 

Quarter-Master 

Duncan  Stewart 

j>                 » 

Surgeon 

John  McLean 

u                 » 

Reference  to  this  list  shows  that  Major  Cameron  was  not  unmindful 
of  his  old  brother  officers  of  the  Highland  Emigrant  Corps,  as  he 
selected  five  officers  of  the  Clan  Maclean.  When  the  half  pay  lists 
were  exhausted,  and  he  was  released  from  the  War  office  regulations, 
commissions  in  the  regiment  were  always  given  to  his  Lochaber 
relations,  as  reference  to  the  Army  list  in  subsequent  years  will  fully 
testify. 

The  business  of  raising  the  regiment,  which  was  done  without 
bounty  at  Major  Cameron's  own  expense,  was  carried  on  in  real 
earnest  during  the  closing  months  of  1793,  and,  as  it  was  Major 
Cameron's  desire  that  the  complement  should  be  made  up  of  as 
many  men  from  his  own  district  as  possible,  he  and  his  officers  visited 
every  part  round  about,  so  that  between  Lochaber,  Appin,  Morvern, 
and  Mull  750  men  were  collected  at  Fort  William  in  less  than  two 
months. 

The  Earl  of  Breadalbane  kindly  permitted  70  or  80  men  of  the 
Breadalbane  Fencibles  to  volunteer  to  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  but, 
having  omitted  the  perhaps  necessary  formality  of  asking  the  per- 
mission of  Lord  Adam  Gordon  (then  commanding  the  forces  in 


8  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Scotland)  before  doing  so,  Major  Cameron  received  a  peremptory 
order  to  return  them  to  their  corps. 

In  December,  1793,  the  regiment  was  assembled  at  Fort  William, 
where  it  paraded  for  the  first  time,  the  roll  being  called  by  its  first 
Adjutant,  Archibald  McLean  :  the  ranks  of  the  regiment  were  filled 
for  the  most  part  with  men  of  the  names  of  Cameron,  Gunn,  Maclean, 
and  Mackay. 

A  few  days  later  Major  Cameron  and  his  regiment  marched  out  of 
Fort  William,  the  pipers  playing  the  well  known  air — "  Gabhaidh  sinn 
an  rathad  mor"  *  and  proceeded  to  Stirling,  a  large  crowd  of  the 
inhabitants  accompanying  the  regiment  for  a  considerable  distance. 

1794. 

The  regiment  reached  Stirling  on  the  third  day  of  the  march  at 
noon. 

On  the  3rd  of  January,  1794,  it  was  inspected  by  Lieutenant- 
General  Leslie,  in  the  King's  Park,  at  Stirling,  and  was  passed  by  him 
as  an  effective  corps,  receiving  the  designation  of  the  "  79th  Cameron 
Highlanders  :  "  no  less  than  100  supernumeraries  were  present  on 
parade. 

On  the  10th  of  January  Major  Cameron  received  the  following 
letter  from  Lord  Amherst,  directing  him  to  augment  the  regiment  to 
1,000  rank  and  file. 

"  St.  James's  Square, 

"  10th  January,  1794. 
"  SIR, 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter 
of  the  29th,  and  to  acquaint  you  that  the  order  for  augmenting  your 
regiment  to  the  same  establishment  as  regiments  in  Ireland  has  re- 
ceived the  king's  approbation,  and  the  particular  directions  will  be 
transmitted  to  you  soon. 

"  I  am  to  acknowledge  also  your  favour  of  the  4th  instant,  and  a 
state  of  your  regiment  and  a  list  of  officers  therewith  enclosed,  which 
have  come  to  my  hands  this  day. 

"Your  supernumerary  men  will  of  course  make  a  part  of  your 

*  '  We  will  keep  the  high  road." 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  9 

augmentation,  and  you  will  leave  such  officers  and  parties  for  carrying 
out  the  recruiting  service  as  you  shall  think  necessary. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  etc., 

(Signed)  "  AMHERST." 

"  To  Major  Alan  Cameron." 

Major  Cameron  and  some  of  his  officers  at  once  repaired  to 
Lochaber,  and  in  five-and-twenty  days  had  raised  the  required  num- 
ber of  men.  When  the  establishment  of  1,000  was  completed,  Major 
Cameron  was  advanced  to  the  lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  regiment. 

In  the  month  of  February  the  regiment  received  its  colours,  and 
shortly  afterwards  marched  from  Stirling  to  Portpatrick,  where  it 
embarked  for  Ireland  and  was  stationed  in  Belfast  until  the  month  of 
June. 

Whilst  at  Belfast  the  regiment  was  fin>t  issued  with  its  uniform, 
which  was  very  similar  to  that  worn  by  other  Highland  corps,  except 
that  the  facings  were  green.  Lieutenant-Colonel  Cameron  however 
did  not  adopt  the  Cameron  tartan  proper  as  the  dress  of  the  regiment, 
considering  that  its  prevailing  colour  red  would  not  be  suitable  for 
wear  with  a  scarlet  tunic.  He  therefore  introduced  a  tartan  designed 
by  his  mother,  now  known  as  the  "  Cameron  Erracht,"  which  has  been 
worn  by  the  79th  ever  since. 

In  June,  1794,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  ordered  to  England, 
and,  landing  at  Southampton,  were  quartered  at  Frome. 

The  new  regiment  was  not  destined  to  remain  long  in  a  state  of 
inactivity,  for,  on  the  14th  August,  1794,  it  formed  part  of  an 
expedition  which  embarked  at  Southampton  under  the  command  of 
Major-General  Lord  Mulgrave,  proceeding  to  reinforce  the  combined 
English  and  Austrian  army  then  acting  against  the  French  in  Flanders, 
under  the  command  of  His  Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  York. 

The  troops  composing  this  reinforcement  landed  at  Gorcum,  near 
Flushing,  on  the  26th  of  August,  and  marched  to  Arnheim,  then  the 
head-quarters  of  the  army,  from  whence  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
were  immediately  despatched  with  other  troops  to  reinforce  the 
garrison  of  Nimeguen,  then  in  possession  of  the  allies.  Nimeguen, 
however,  being  soon  afterwards  evacuated  by  the  allied  troops,  the 


10  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    Of   THE 

regiment  shared  in  the  subsequent  disasters  which  attended  the  retreat 
of  the  army  through  Westphalia  till  its  arrival  at  Bremen. 

1795-6-7. 

In  the  spring  of  1795  the  regiment  embarked  at  Bremen,  and 
landed  in  the  Isle  of  Wight  on  the  12th  of  May,  having  lost  in  this 
short  and  inglorious  campaign  no  less  than  200  men  from  privation 
and  severity  of  the  climate. 

The  regiment  was  quartered  at  Newport  until  June,  when  orders 
were  received  by  Colonel  Cameron  for  its  immediate  completion  to 
1,000  rank  and  file,  preparatory  to  its  embarkation  for  India ;  but, 
whilst  making  every  endeavour  to  recruit  the  regiment  to  the  requisite 
strength,  he  received  a  private  intimation  that  directions  had  been 
forwarded  to  Major  General  Hunter,  then  commanding  the  troops  in 
the  Isle  of  Wight,  to  draft  the  Cameron  Highlanders  into  four  other 
regiments.  Fortunately  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief 
happened  to  be  at  this  time  on  a  tour  of  inspection  at  Portsmouth, 
and  Colonel  Cameron  lost  no  time  in  obtaining  an  interview  with 
him,  and  respectfully  but  firmly  remonstrated  on  the  extreme  hardship 
and  injustice  of  the  proposed  measure,  which,  besides  being  a  direct 
breach  of  faith  to  him  personally,  was  also  in  open  violation  of  a 
specific  clause  in  His  Majesty's  "  Letter  of  Service  "  for  raising  the 
regiment. 

It  is  related  that  at  this  interview  Colonel  Cameron  plainly  told  the 
Duke  that  "  to  draft  the  79th  is  more  than  you  or  your  Royal  father 
dare  do."  The  Duke  then  said:  "The  King,  my  father,  will  cer- 
tainly send  the  regiment  to  the  West  Indies."  Colonel  Cameron, 
losing  his  temper,  replied  :  "  You  may  tell  the  King,  your  father,  from 

me,  that  he  may  send  us  to  h if  he  likes,  and  I'll  go  at  the  head 

of  them,  but  he  daurna  draft  us : " — a  line  of  argument  which,  it  is 
unnecessary  to  add,  proved  to  the  Royal  Duke  perfectly  irresistible. 

The  vexatious  order  for  drafting  was  rescinded,  and  the  intended 
destination  of  the  regiment  changed,  directions  being  given  for  it  to 
be  held  in  readiness  to  embark  for  the  Island  of  Martinique  in  the 
West  Indies,  which  had,  during  the  previous  year,  been  captured 
from  the  French.  The  regiment  accordingly  sailed  from  Cowes  on 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  11 

this  service  on  the  10th  of  July,  1795,  and  landed  at  Fort  Royal  on 
the  20th  of  September.  It  was  stationed  in  this  island,  performing  the 
most  laborious  duties  on  board  infectious  prison  ships  and  in  sickly 
quarters,  until  June,  1797,  by  which  time  it  had  become  so  much 
reduced  in  strength  from  the  diseases  incidental  to  such  an  unhealthy 
climate,  that  it  was  proposed  by  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  the  general 
commanding  the  station,  who,  if  the  manuscript  records  in  possession 
of  the  regiment  may  be  believed,  was  actuated  by  great  personal 
animosity  against  Colonel  Cameron,  to  send  home  the  skeleton  of  the 
corps,  consisting  of  the  officers,  sergeants,  and  drummers,  and  to 
draft  the  remaining  rank  and  file — 229  in  number — to  other  regiments 
on  the  station.  This  proposition  of  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  which 
Colonel  Cameron  strongly  opposed  as  being  most  harsh  and  unfair, 
after  much  correspondence  was  peremptorily  insisted  upon  and 
carried  into  effect  as  follows  : — 

To  42nd  Royal  Highlanders  -  217  men. 

„    38th  Foot  1  man. 

„    53rd  Foot  8  men. 

„    57th  Foot  2  men. 

„    60th  Foot  1  man. 

The  skeleton  of  the  regiment  accordingly  embarked  on  board  the 
Coromandel,  an  armed  East  Indiaman,  commanded  by  Lieutenant 
Harrison,  R.N.,  and  sailed  for  England.  In  passing  the  island  of 
Nevis  the  ship  struck  on  a  sunken  rock,  where  she  remained  fast 
without  any  assistance  for  several  hours.  Some  lighters  from  the 
island  being  procured,  large  quantities  of  her  stores  were  transhipped, 
by  which  she  was  enabled  to  float  off,  and  on  arrival  soon  after  at 
St.  Kitts  she  was  inspected  and  declared  by  her  commander  fit  to 
proceed  on  her  voyage.  The  ship  arrived  at  Gravesend  in  the  middle 
of  August,  1797,  when  the  remnant  of  the  79th  landed  and  marched 
into  Chatham  Barracks.  Colonel  Cameron  at  once  hastened  to  report 
his  arrival  to  the  commander-in-chief,  forwarding  a  complaint  of  the 
manner  he  and  his  regiment  had  been  treated.  As  a  result,  immediate 
orders  were  issued  to  complete  the  79th,  and,  with  a  view  to  facilitate 
the  recruiting  in  the  Highlands,  the  regiment  was  removed  to  Inver- 
ness. So  indefatigable  were  Colonel  Cameron  and  his  officers  in  their 


12  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

exertions  during  the  winter  of  1797,  that,  by  the  month  of  June,  1798, 
when  the  corps  marched  to  Stirling,  it  mustered  780  men  on  parade 
exclusive  of  officers. 

1798. 

In  July  the  Cameron  Highlanders  marched  to  Leith,  where  they 
embarked  for  Guernsey,  and  landing  on  the  10th  of  August  occupied 
Vale  Castle  Barracks. 

1799. 

The  regiment  remained  at  Guernsey  until  the  23rd  of  June,  1799, 
when  it  embarked  for  England  in  order  to  form  part  of  a  second 
expedition  to  Holland  under  the  command  of  His  Royal  Highness  the 
Duke  of  York.  Early  in  August  it  sailed  with  the  first  division  of 
troops  from  Ramsgate,  and  landed  on  the  27th  without  opposition  at 
the  Helder,  in  North  Holland,  at  the  entrance  of  the  Zuyder  Zee. 
The  79th  was  brigaded  with  the  2nd  Battalion  Royals,  25th,  49th,  and 
92nd  regiments,  under  the  command  of  Major-General  Moore.  A 
portion  of  the  Brigade,  including  the  79th,  was  selected  to  garrison 
the  forts  and  batteries  at  Helder  Point,  which  had  been  evacuated  by 
the  enemy.  On  the  10th  of  September  the  regiment  marched  to 
Schagen  and  encamped,  and  on  the  18th  joined  the  army  near  Hoorn. 

At  half-past  six  a.m.  on  the  2nd  of  October,  (in  pursuance  of  a  plan 
of  attack  on  the  whole  of  the  enemy's  line),  the  4th  Division  of  the 
army,  commanded  by  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  advanced  in  column 
along  the  beach,  for  the  purpose  of  turning  his  left  flank,  protected  by 
a  wide  and  broken  range  of  sand  hills,  amongst  which,  after  a  march 
of  some  hours,  and  when  within  a  mile  of  the  village  of  Egmont-op-Zee, 
the  enemy  was  found  posted.  Major-General  Moore's  brigade  formed 
line  to  the  left  of  the  division,  and  advanced  to  the  attack ;  but  the 
hills,  consisting  of  detached  knolls  of  loose  sand,  in  proportion  as  they 
favoured  the  enemy,  by  enabling  him  to  conceal  his  numbers  and 
exact  position,  were,  by  the  difficulties  which  they  opposed  to  the 
regular  formation  and  advance  of  the  brigade,  highly  unfavourable  to 
the  attacking  line.  A  charge  with  the  bayonet  was  therefore  ordered, 
and  this  bold  attack  was  executed  with  the  greatest  gallantry  and 
success  by  the  79th,  92nd,  1st  Royals,  and  25th.  The  enemy  was 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  13 

quickly  driven  from  all  parts  of  his  position,  pursued  closely  by  the 
brigade  to  a  considerable  distance  over  the  sand-hills,  until  darkness 
intervening  put  an  end  to  the  conflict,  and  the  troops  bivouacked  for 
the  night  on  the  ground  from  which  the  enemy  had  been  dislodged. 
The  second  brigade  of  the  division  and  the  columns  of  Generals 
Dundas  and  Pulteney,  together  with  the  Russian  contingent  under  the 
command  of  Count  D'Essen,  were  in  the  meantime  enabled  to 
continue  corresponding  movements  on  the  enemy's  centre  and  right, 
and  his  line  being  forced  at  every  point  of  attack,  he  was  compelled 
to  retire  and  take  up  a  new  position  between  Beverwyck  and  Wyck-op- 
Zee.  A  complete  victory  was  thus  obtained,  but,  owing  to  the 
exhausted  state  of  the  troops  and  the  difficult  nature  of  the  country, 
the  army  was  prevented  from  following  up  its  success  by  pursuit. 

The  loss  of  the  regiment  in  this,  the  maiden-field  of  the  newly  raised 
battalion,  was  Captain  James  Campbell  of  the  Grenadier  company, 
Lieutenant  Stair  Rose,  and  13  rank  and  file  killed;  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Alan  Cameron,  Lieutenants  Donald  McNeil  and  Colin 
McDonald,  4  sergeants,  and  54  rank  and  file  wounded  ;  2  rank  and 
file  missing.  Colonel  Cameron  was  shot  through  the  arm  early  in  the 
action,  and  later  in  the  day  was  very  severely  wounded  in  the  wrist, 
which  latter  wound  deprived  him  of  the  use  of  his  arm  for  the  rest  of 
his  life. 

In  General  Orders,  dated  5th  October,  1799,  "  Head-quarters, 
Alkmaar,"  the  brigade  received  the  thanks  of  His  Royal  Highness 
the  commander-in-chief,  who,  in  passing  it  the  day  after  the  battle, 
approached  the  79th,  and  addressing  Major  McLean  enquired  for 
Colonel  Cameron,  and  expressed  a  hope  that  his  wound  was  not 
severe ;  then,  turning  to  the  officers  and  men  of  the  corps,  he  said, 
"  Major  McLean,  nothing  could  do  the  regiment  more  credit  than 
its  conduct  yesterday  !  " 

Some  days  after  the  thanks  of  Major-General  Moore  (who  was 
confined  from  the  effects  of  a  severe  wound)  were  communicated  to 
the  regiment— paraded  for  that  purpose — accompanied  by  an  expression 
of  the  general's  regret  that  he  was  unable  to  convey  them  to  the  corps 
in  person. 

For  its  distinguished  conduct  in  this  action  the  regiment  received 


14  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

the  royal  authority  to  have  the  word  "  Egmont-op-Zee  "  inscribed  on 
its  colours  and  appointments. 

In  the  severe  action  which  followed  on  the  6th  of  October  in  the 
vicinity  of  Alkmaar,  the  79th  was  not  engaged ;  and  the  army  having 
retired  towards  Petten  on  the  7th,  an  armistice  was  concluded  between 
His  Royal  Highness  and  the  French  General  Brune,  by  which  it  was 
stipulated  that  the  allied  English  and  Russian  armies  should  evacuate 
Holland. 

The  regiment  accordingly  embarked  at  the  Texel  on  the  29th  of 
October,  and  having  landed  at  Yarmouth  on  the  1st  of  November, 
marched  first  to  Norwich  and  afterwards  to  Chelmsford  barracks. 

1800. 

In  the  month  of  April,  1800,  the  regiment  was  removed  from 
Chelmsford  to  the  Isle  of  Wight,  where  it  occupied  Sandown  barracks 
until  the  following  June,  when  it  was  removed  to  Southampton  and 
encamped  with  other  troops  on  Netley  Common,  preparatory  to 
joining  a  combined  naval  and  military  expedition,  then  assembling 
under  the  command  of  Rear-Admiral  Sir  John  Borlase-Warren,  and 
Lieutenant-General  Sir  James  Pulteney,  with  the  design  of  destroying 
the  Spanish  arsenals  and  shipping  in  the  harbours  of  Ferrol  and  Cadiz. 
The  fleet,  with  the  troops  on  board,  sailed  from  Southampton  on  the 
16th  of  August,  and  on  the  25th  of  the  same  month  arrived  before 
Ferrol  on  the  coast  of  Galicia.  A  debarkation  was  effected  the 
same  evening  in  a  small  opening  near  Cape  Prior,  a  few  miles  north 
of  Ferrol,  whilst  the  men-of-war  proceeded  off  and  blockaded  the 
mouth  of  the  harbour. 

The  Rifle  corps,  then  newly-formed  by  detachments  from  different 
regiments,  under  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Stewart,  acted  as  an 
advance  guard  of  the  army,  which  was  put  in  motion  towards  Ferrol, 
and  ascending  a  ridge  of  hills  immediately  dislodged  a  strong  body 
of  the  enemy  which  was  favourably  posted  to  resist  its  advance.  The 
troops  were  occupied  in  gaining  this  position  till  1  a.m.  on  the  26th, 
when,  having  reached  the  summit  of  the  ridge,  they  bivouacked  for 
the  remainder  of  the  night. 

At  daybreak  on  the  following  morning  Major-General  Morshead's 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  15 

brigade,  consisting  of  the  1st  and  2nd  battalions  of  the  2nd  Foot, 
27th  Foot,  and  79th  Highlanders,  moved  forward  to  support  an  attack 
made  by  the  52nd  regiment,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel  Kirkman,  upon 
a  considerable  body  of  the  enemy,  and  were  assailed  by  a  brisk  fire 
from  the  Spanish  troops,  who,  however,  immediately  commenced  to 
retreat,  and  were  pursued  along  the  ridge  to  the  mouth  of  the  harbour, 
where,  under  the  protection  of  the  guns  of  Fort  St.  Philip,  they  were 
conveyed  in  boats  to  the  town.  The  army  was  now  in  undisputed 
possession  of  the  heights  of  Brian  and  Balon,  which  completely  com- 
manded the  town  of  Ferrol  and  the  shipping  in  its  harbour ;  but,  to 
the  surprise  of  all,  when  complete  success  appeared  to  be  within  his 
grasp,  Sir  James  Pulteney  ordered  a  retreat  and  the  troops  re-embarked 
again  on  the  29th.  The  fleet  then  weighed  and  anchored  again  in 
Vigo  Bay. 

In  this  indecisive  affair  the  regiment  had  Captain  Robert  Travers, 
two  sergeants,  and  two  rank  and  file  wounded ;  and  the  staff  of  the 
regimental  colour,  carried  by  Ensign  Cooksey,  was  pierced  by  a  musket 
ball. 

The  fleet  whilst  anchored  in  Vigo  Bay  encountered  a  heavy  gale, 
and  the  Minerva  transport,  with  three  companies  of  the  79th  on 
board,  narrowly  escaped  destruction. 

On  the  6th  of  September  the  fleet  left  Vigo,  and  arrived  in  the  Bay 
of  Gibraltar  on  the  19th.  Here  a  combined  naval  and  military 
expedition  was  organised  under  Admiral  Lord  Keith  and  Lieutenant- 
General  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  the  latter  superseding  Sir  James 
Pulteney  in  command  of  the  troops,  with  a  view  to  destroying  the 
town  and  arsenal  at  Cadiz.  The  whole  fleet  then  proceeded  to  Tetuan 
Bay,  on  the  Barbary  coast,  where  it  was  delayed  for  some  time  by  bad 
weather ;  it  eventually  appeared  before  Cadiz  on  the  4th  of  October. 

As  a  summons  to  surrender  met  with  a  prompt  refusal  from  the 
governor  of  the  city — Don  Thomas  de  Morla — hostilities  were  resolved 
upon,  and  the  Cameron  Highlanders  amongst  other  troops  were 
actually  in  the  boats  ready  to  land  and  assault  the  town,  when  the 
enterprise  was  suddenly  abandoned  owing  to  threatening  weather  and 
a  fear  that  the  troops  might  be  infected  with  the  plague  which  was 
then  raging  in  Cadiz, 


16  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

The  fleet  then  put  to  sea  and  arrived  in  Gibraltar  bay  on  the  23rd 
of  October,  from  whence  it  again  sailed  on  the  4th  of  November,  with 
the  troops  still  on  board,  on  an  expedition  for  the  expulsion  of  the 
French  army  in  Egypt.  The  fleet  stopped  for  about  twenty  days  at 
Malta,  during  which  time  the  79th  was  encamped  on  shore.  Whilst 
at  Malta  279  volunteers  from  Highland  Fencible  Corps  joined  the 

regiment. 

1801. 

In  January,  1801,  the  fleet  rendezvoused  in  Marmorice  Bay  on  the 
coast  of  Caramania,  in  Asia  Minor,  where  it  remained  until  the  23rd 
of  February.  During  its  stay  there  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  on 
shore  collecting  wood  and  water.  When  all  preparations  for  the 
descent  upon  Egypt  were  made,  the  fleet  sailed,  and  dropped  anchor 
in  Aboukir  Bay  on  the  1st  of  March ;  but  from  the  unfavourable 
state  of  the  weather  it  was  found  necessary  to  delay  the  debarkation 
until  the  8th.  At  9  o'clock  on  the  morning  of  that  date  the  troops 
disembarked  under  a  severe  fire  from  the  French  batteries ;  but  the 
enemy  being  quickly  repulsed  and  driven  in  the  direction  of  Alexandria, 
a  position  was  selected  for  the  army  across  the  peninsula  of  that  name, 
at  some  distance  in  advance  of  the  place  of  landing. 

The  period  from  this  date  until  the  12th  was  occupied  in  making 
the  necessary  dispositions  for  an  attack  and  in  landing  artillery  and 
stores  from  the  fleet.  On  the  12th  the  whole  army  moved  forward  in 
a  long  line  extending  from  the  Mediterranean  to  Lake  Mareotis, 
driving  in  the  French  picquets,  and  arrived  within  sight  of  the  enemy, 
who  was  occupying  an  advantageous  ridge  of  sand-hills,  with  his  right 
on  Lake  Maadie  and  his  left  on  the  sea,  and  barring  the  approach  to 
Alexandria. 

The  79th  was  brigaded  with  the  2nd  and  50th  regiments,  under  the 
command  of  Major-General  Lord  Cavan.  On  the  morning  of  the 
13th  of  March  this  brigade,  with  Major-General  Craddocks'  brigade  on 
its  right,  was  directed  to  attack  the  enemy's  right  flank,  supported  by 
a  corresponding  movement  on  his  left  and  centre  by  the  remainder  of 
the  army.  The  90th  and  92nd  Highlanders,  forming  the  advanced 
guards  of  the  two  left  columns  of  attack,  met  at  a  short  distance  from 
the  encampment  with  the  enemy's  first  line,  which  offered  a  spirited 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  17 

resistance,  causing  a  severe  loss,  and  at  the  same  time  the  enemy's 
cavalry  charged  the  90th,  which  received  and  repulsed  this  charge  in 
line  with  the  greatest  steadiness.  The  British  then  pushed  forward 
and  charged  the  enemy,  who  was  posted  behind  an  elevated  ridge  of 
sand,  and  drove  him  from  his  position  with  the  bayonet.  The  enemy 
was  compelled  to  retreat,  and  withdrew,  pursued  by  the  British  line, 
for  several  miles  over  plains  of  sand ;  ultimately  he  took  refuge  under 
the  walls  of  Alexandria. 

The  loss  of  the  regiment  in  this  action  was  5  rank  and  file  killed ; 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Patrick  McDowall,  Lieutenants  George  Sutherland 
and  John  Stewart,  Volunteer  Allan  Cameron,  Surgeon  Egan,  2 
sergeants,  and  56  rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  idea  of  a  renewed  attack  on  the  enemy  being  for  the  present 
relinquished,  the  army  retired  two  miles,  and  took  up  a  position  on 
some  high  ground  with  its  right  on  the  sea  at  an  old  ruin  called 
Cleopatra's  Palace  and  its  left  on  the  Canal  of  Alexandria  and  Lake 
Mareotis.  The  time  between  this  and  the  20th  was  occupied  in 
strengthening  this  position  by  redoubts  and  entrenchments. 

During  the  night  of  the  20th  a  false  alarm  caused  most  of  the 
troops  to  stand  to  their  arms,  and  Colonel  Cameron  decided,  as  it 
was  getting  near  morning,  to  remain  under  arms  until  daylight. 
Fortunate,  perhaps,  it  was  he  did  so,  for  in  the  grey  dawn  a  body  of 
the  enemy  suddenly  surprised  our  advanced  battery  on  the  left.  The 
report  of  the  firing  at  once  brought  Lord  Hopetoun,  the  Adjutant- 
General,  to  where  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  drawn  up,  and  in 
answer  to  his  enquiries  Colonel  Cameron  replied,  that,  from  the 
nature  of  the  ground,  it  must  be  a  false  attack  to  favour  a  real  one 
elsewhere. 

Almost  immediately  the  firing  ceased  suddenly  on  the  left,  and  gave 
place  to  a  general  and  uninterrupted  fire  on  the  right,  thus  revealing 
the  real  object  of  the  enemy's  attack.  The  approach  of  day  dis- 
covered the  French  columns  of  cavalry  and  a  numerous  artillery 
drawn  up  in  the  plain  at  a  short  distance,  when  a  mutual  cannonade 
began.  The  light  companies  of  the  2nd,  50th,  and  79th  regiments, 
and  some  dismounted  dragoons  were  thrown  out  in  front  to  hold  the 
enemy's  riflemen  in  check,  and  the  contest  on  the  right  raged  with 

c 


18  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

the  greatest  fury,  but  without  any  apparent  result,  until  a  sudden  and 
formidable  attack  was  made  on  the  British  centre  by  the  advance  of  a 
large  body  of  infantry  in  close  column.  This  attack  was  most  gallantly 
repulsed  by  the  foot  guards,  under  Major-General  Ludlow,  and  the 
enemy,  despairing  of  success,  collected  his  broken  and  dispersed 
columns  and  withdrew  to  his  original  position. 

In  this  engagement  His  Majesty's  service  sustained  a  severe  loss  in 
Lieutenant-General  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  who  was  mortally  wounded 
towards  its  close.  The  loss  of  the  79th  was  1  sergeant  killed; 
Lieutenant  Patrick  Ross,*  2  sergeants,  and  18  rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  having  been  transferred  to  Major- 
General  Craddock's  brigade,  that  portion  of  the  army  and  a  division 

*  Lieutenant  Patrick  Ross  was  a  most  gallant  officer.  His  wound  necessitated 
the  amputation  of  his  arm,  but  so  great  was  his  zeal  and  determination  that 
within  three  weeks  he  returned  to  regimental  duty  and  went  on  outlying  picquet. 

His  father,  Mr.  William  Ross,  late  tacksman  of  Brae,  in  Ross-shire,  evinced 
similar  qualities  early  in  life.  In  the  summer  of  1746,  when  so  many  gentlemen 
who  had  been  engaged  in  the  rebellion  were  forced  to  take  refuge  in  the  woods  and 
mountains,  and  when  the  troops  were  quartered  on  their  estates,  Ross  of  Pitcaluey, 
a  chieftain  of  the  clan,  was  an  object  of  more  than  ordinary  search,  having  joined 
Prince  Charlie  in  opposition  to  the  remonstrances  and  threats  of  his  uncle,  the  Lord 
President  Forbes.  As  no  concealment  from  the  people  was  necessary,  Pitcalney 
was  in  the  habit  of  sleeping  in  bad  weather  in  his  tenants'  houses,  but  always  going 
to  one  or  other  of  his  hiding  places  before  daylight  in  case  of  a  search  of  the 
house  by  the  troops.  One  night  he  slept  in  the  farm  house  at  Brae,  and,  remaining 
later  in  the  morning  than  ordinarily,  Mr.  Ross,  then  a  lad  of  fifteen,  was  directed 
by  his  father  to  accompany  Pitcalney  through  the  most  unfrequented  parts  of  the 
woods  in  case  the  troops  should  be  stirring  at  that  late  hour  of  the  day.  The  lad 
had  performed  his  task,  and  was  returning  home,  when  he  met  a  party  of  soldiers 
who  knew  him,  and,  suspecting  where  he  had  been,  questioned  him  very  sharply 
about  Pitcalney's  retreat.  He  pleaded  total  ignorance,  and,  persisting  in  doing  so, 
they  threatened  to  shoot  him  or  hang  him  on  the  next  tree— a  menace  which,  in 
those  times,  was  the  usual  mode  of  extorting  confession.  But  this  having  no  effect 
they  proceeded  to  action,  and  tied  him  up  to  a  tree,  placing  four  men  before  him 
with  their  pieces  ready  to  fire  if  he  still  denied  what  they  were  sensible  he  knew. 
But  all  in  vain,  neither  the  fear  of  death  nor  the  previous  preparation,  which,  to  a 
boy  of  his  age,  must  have  been  sufficiently  trying,  could  induce  him  to  betray  the 
friend  and  landlord  of  his  father,  so  strong  were  the  principles  instilled  thus  early 
by  the  instruction  of  his  parents  and  the  example  of  his  countrymen.  The  party 
either  respecting  the  boy's  firmness,  or  not  wishing  to  carry  matters  to  extremity, 
released  him  and  allowed  him  to  go  home.  When  he  told  the  story,  he  always 
concluded — "  When  I  shut  my  eyes,  waiting  to  be  shot,  I  expected  to  open  them 
again  in  heaven."  Such  was  the  father  of  the  brave  Lieutenant  Patrick  Ross. 

General  Stewart's  Book,  "History  of  the  Highland  Regiments," 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  19 

of  Turks  under  the  Capitan-Pasha  were  selected  to  proceed  to  Cairo, 
and,  after  a  toilsome  march  of  many  days  up  the  left  bank  of  the  Nile, 
they  were  encountered  on  the  evening  of  the  9th  of  May  by  a  Frenchr 
force  under  General  le  Grange,  near  the  village  and  fort  of  Rhamanieh. 
In  this  affair  the  light  companies  only  were  engaged,  and  the  enemy 
retired  towards  Cairo  during  the  night,  leaving  a  small  garrison  in  the 
fort,  which  surrendered  at  discretion  the  following  morning.  In  this 
skirmish  the  regiment  had  Captain  Samuel  McDowall  and  1  rank  and 
file  wounded.  The  division  then  proceeded  to  Cairo,  where  the 
French  capitulated  under  a  convention  signed  by  the  French  General 
Belliard  and  Lord  Hutchinson,  and  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had 
the  honour  of  being  selected  to  take  possession  of  the  advanced  gate, 
termed  the  Gate  of  the  Pyramids,  in  the  fortress  of  Ghizeh. 

The  army  of  Sir  David  Baird,  which  had  arrived  from  India  by  way 
of  the  Red  Sea,  having  been  left  to  occupy  Cairo,  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  then  proceeded  to  join  the  army  then  laying  siege  to 
Alexandria,  which  city,  being  closely  invested  on  all  sides,  in  a  few 
days  surrendered,  and  with  its  fall  closed  this  short  but  arduous  and 
glorious  campaign,  whereby  a  second  convention  was  obtained  result- 
ing in  the  total  expulsion  of  the  French  from  Egypt. 

For  its  distinguished  services  during  the  campaign,  the  79th  received, 
in  conjunction  with  other  corps,  the  thanks  of  His  Majesty  George 
III.,  of  both  Houses  of  Parliament,  as  well  as  of  Lieutenant-General 
Hely  Hutchinson,  afterwards  Lord  Hutchinson  and  Earl  of  Donough- 
more,  who,  after  the  death  of  Sir  Ralph  Abercromby,  assumed  the 
chief  command.  The  regiment  also  received  the  royal  authority  to 
bear  the  figure  of  a  sphinx  with  the  word  "  Egypt "  on  its  colours  and 
appointments,  in  commemoration  of  its  services.  The  French  troops 
having  been  shipped  off  to  Europe,  the  army  prepared  to  return  to 
England;  and  on  the  21st  October,  one  wing  of  the  regiment,  with 
many  other  corps,  embarked  and  had  actually  sailed,  when  it  became 
known  to  General  Hutchinson  that  several  Mameluke  Beys  had  been 
perfidiously  murdered  by  order  of  the  Capitan-Pasha.  The  remain- 
ing part  of  the  army  which  had  also  embarked,  including  the  second 
wing  of  the  79th,  was  instantly  re-landed,  and  forthwith  marched  to 
the  front  of  the  Turkish  encampment  near  Alexandria.  The  Capitan- 


20  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

Pasha  was  seized  and  made  a  prisoner  in  his  tent,  while  reparation 
was  demanded  for  this  atrocious  act  committed  in  presence  of  and 
under  the  protection  of  the  British  flag.  Every  submission  was  of 
course  tendered,  and  a  justification  attempted  by  alleging  that  he  had 
acted  in  accordance  with  orders  from  his  Government.  The  troops 
then  finally  re-embarked,  and  the  left  wing  of  the  Cameron  High- 
landers proceeded  to  the  island  of  Minorca,  where  it  landed  in  the 
month  of  December,  and  joined  the  head-quarters  of  the  regiment, 
which  had  in  the  meantime  been  ordered  into  garrison  there. 

1802. 

The  regiment  was  stationed  in  Minorca  till  June,  1802,  when  it 
sailed  for  England,  and  landed  at  Kirkcaldy,  in  Fifeshire,  on  the  2nd 
of  August.  Detachments  were  forthwith  sent  to  Cupar  and  Dundee, 
and  various  recruiting  parties  despatched  to  the  north  to  make  up 
deficiences,  all  of  which  were  filled  up  by  the  end  of  the  year. 

1803. 

In  February,  1803,  the  regiment  moved  to  Ireland,  where  it 
remained  performing  garrison  duty  in  different  parts  of  the  country 
till  1805. 

1804. 

In  the  month  of  April,  1804,  a  letter  of  service  was  granted  to 
Colonel  Cameron,  at  the  special  request  of  His  Majesty  the  King,  to 
raise  a  second  battalion  to  the  regiment,  which  was  to  consist  of  1,000 
Highlanders. 


0f  ^rirto  to  ratss  t}jt  siumifr  battaltnn 
Tfltlj  lUgitrant 

"  War  Office,  19th  April,  1804. 

"SiR, 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  acquaint  you  that  His  Majesty  has 
been  pleased  to  approve  of  a  2nd  battalion  being  added  to  the  79th 
regiment  of  foot  under  your  command,  to  consist  of  the  numbers 


'9'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


21 


mentioned  below,  and  to  be  raised  upon  the  following  conditions, 
viz. — 


1  Lieutenant-Colonel 

2  Majors 
10  Captains 

12  Lieutenants 
8  Ensigns 
1  Paymaster 
1  Adjutant 

"  The  recruiting  is 
shall  be  selected  by 
who  are  respectively 
number  of  recruits  : — 


TEN  COMPANIES. 

1  Quartermaster 

1  Surgeon 

2  Assistant-Surgeons 
1  Sergeant-Major 

1  Quartermaster-Sergt. 
1  Paymaster-Sergeant 


1  Armourer-Sergeant 
5®  Sergeants 

50  Corporals 
20  Drummers 

2  Pipers 
950  Privates. 


to  be  undertaken  by  such  officers  of  the  line  as 
His   Royal   Highness  the  commander-in-chief, 
to  raise  for  their  promotion  the  undermentioned 


Major,  for  Lieutenant-Colonel      -     -  82  men  -     82 

2  Captains  for  majorities,  each     -     -  90     „  -  180 

10  Lieutenants  for  companies,  each  -  45     „  •  450 

12  Ensigns  for  Lieutenancies,  each   -  10     „  -  120 

8  Gentlemen  for  Ensigncies,  each      -  21     „  -  168 

Total 1000 

"  It  is  to  be  clearly  understood  that  no  pecuniary  consideration  is 
to  be  given  by  the  officers  concerned  in  the  levy  for  their  promotion, 
their  personal  exertions  being  all  that  is  required.  The  men  are  to 
be  enlisted  without  limitation  as  to  time  and  place  of  service. 

"  The  levy  is  to  be  completed  within  six  months  of  the  date  of  this 
letter. 

"The  officers  who  raise  their  respective  quotas  within  the  said  period, 
and  whose  recruits  shall  have  been  finally  approved  of  at  the  head- 
quarters of  the  regiment  or  battalion  by  the  general  officer  by  whom 
the  men  will  be  inspected,  will  be  recommended  to  His  Majesty  for 
commissions  of  an  equal  date  with  this  letter  of  service. 

"  The  officers  who  fail  to  complete  their  quotas  within  the  period 
above  specified  will  have  no  claim  to  promotion  on  this  occasion,  but 
must  remain  in  their  former  ranks.  Whatever  recruits  they  may  have 
raised  are  to  be  attached  to  your  regiment,  and  for  such  recruits  the 
charge  of  levy  money  as  undermentioned  will  be  admitted. 


22  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

"  The  levy  money  allowed  by  the  public  to  the  officers  raising  men 
for  promotion  on  this  occasion  will  be  as  follows : — 

Bounty  for  each  approved  recruit,  including  necessaries  according 

to  regulation £10  10 

Allowance  to  the  recruiting  officer  for  each  approved  recruit         -     £2  2 

Allowance  to  the  recruiting  party  for  each  approved  recruit           -     £1  ] 

"  The  bounty  above  mentioned  for  the  recruit  is  not,  on  any  occa- 
sion, or  under  any  pretence,  to  be  exceeded ;  any  officer  disobeying 
this  injunction,  or  deviating  from  the  instructions  under  which  he  is 
raising  men,  will,  from  that  circumstance,  be  considered  absolutely  to 
have  forfeited  his  claim  to  promotion. 

"  Men  enlisted  are  not  to  be  taken  above  35  years  of  age,  nor 
under  5  feet  4  inches  high.  Growing  lads  under  18  years  of  age  may 
be  taken  at  5  feet  3  inches.  The  greatest  care  is  to  be  taken  that  no 
man  be  enlisted  who  is  not  stout  and  well  made,  and  that  the  lads  are 
perfectly  well  limbed  and  open  chested. 

"  The  greatest  caution  is  to  be  taken  in  ascertaining  that  the  lads 
who  offer  themselves  are  not  apprentices ;  and  every  enquiry  is  to  be 
made  on  this  head  both  by  the  recruiting  officer  and  by  the  inspecting 
field  officer. 

"  It  will  be  advisable  in  all  cases  where  it  is  practicable  to  procure 
a  certificate  from  the  parish  officer,  to  be  annexed  to  the  attestation, 
setting  forth  that  the  lad  so  enlisted  is  not,  to  their  knowledge  and 
belief,  an  apprentice ;  likewise  specifying  his  age. 

"  In  all  points,  not  specially  adverted  to  in  this  letter,  you  are  to  be 
guided  by  the  established  recruiting  instructions  of  the  army. 

"  In  the  execution  of  this  service  I  have  leave  to  assure  you  of 
every  assistance  that  this  office  can  afford. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

"Sir, 
"  Your  most  obedient  humble  servant, 

(Signed)  "  C.  BRAGGE." 

"  To  Colonel  Cameron, 

"79th  Regiment  of  Foot." 

No  greater  proof  of  Colonel  Cameron's  great  popularity  and  local 


79lH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  23 

influence  in  the  Highlands  is  needed  than  the  fact  that  he  raised  this 
second  battalion  in  a  very  few  months. 

It  was  never  employed  on  active  service,  and  merely  served  annually 
to  supply  the  numerous  vacancies  occurring  in  the  first  battalion  from 
the  casualties  of  war.  It  was  inspected  and  passed  as  an  effective 
corps  at  Stirling  on  the  3rd  of  April,  1805,  and  was  reduced  at  Dundee 
barracks  on  the  25th  of  December,  1815. 

Whilst  engaged  in  recruiting  for  this  battalion,  Colonel  Cameron 
received  the  following  letter  from  Henry  Thorpe,  Esq.,  then  secretary 
to  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief,  relative  to  a  proposal 
to  abolish  the  kilt  as  the  dress  of  the  Highland  regiments : — 

"  Horse  Guards,  13th  October,  1804. 

"  DEAR  COLONEL, 

"  I  am  directed  to  request  that  you  will  state  for  the  informa- 
tion of  the  Adjutant-General,  your  private  opinion  as  to  the  expediency 
of  abolishing  the  kilt  in  Highland  regiments,  and  substituting  in  lieu 
thereof  the  tartan  trews,  which  have  been  represented  to  the  Com- 
mander-in-Chief,  from  respectable  authority,  as  an  article  now  become 
acceptable  to  your  countrymen,  easier  to  be  provided,  and  better 
calculated  to  preserve  the  health  and  promote  the  comfort  of  the  men 
on  service. 

"  I  take  this  opportunity,  by  General  Calvert's  directions,  to  inform 
you  that  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief  cannot  approve 
of  any  distinction  in  the  buttons  of  the  two  battalions  of  the  79th 
regiment.  Your  request,  in  regard  to  the  title  of  your  regiment,  His 
Royal  Highness  will  submit  to  the  King. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be, 

"Sir,  &c, 

(Signed)  "  HENRY  THORPE." 

"  To  Colonel  Alan  Cameron." 

To  this  letter  Colonel  Cameron  sent  the  following  characteristic 

reply  :— 

"  Glasgow,  27th  October,  1804. 
"SIR, 

"On  my  return  hither  some  days  ago  from  Stirling,  I  received 
your  letter  of  the  13th  inst.  (by  General  Calvert's  orders),  respecting 


24  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

the  propriety  of  an  alteration  of  the  mode  in  clothing  Highland 
regiments,  in  reply  to  which  I  beg  to  state,  freely  and  fully,  my  senti- 
ments upon  that  subject,  without  a  particle  of  prejudice  in  either  way, 
but  merely  founded  on  facts  as  applicable  to  these  corps — at  least  as 
far  as  I  am  capable,  from  thirty  years'  experience,  twenty  years  of 
which  have  been  upon  actual  service  in  all  climates,  with  the  descrip- 
tion of  men  in  question,  which,  independent  of  being  myself  a  High- 
lander, and  well  knowing  all  the  convenience  and  inconvenience  of 
our  native  garb  in  the  field  and  otherwise,  and  perhaps,  also,  aware  of 
the  probable  source  and  clashing  motives  from  which  the  suggestion 
now  under  consideration  originally  arose.     I  have  to  observe  progres- 
sively, that  in  course  of  the  late  war,  several  gentlemen  proposed  to 
raise  Highland  regiments — some  for  general  service,  but  chiefly  for 
home  defence ;  but  most  of  these  corps  were  called  upon  from  all 
quarters,  and  thereby  adulterated  by  every  description  of  men,  that 
rendered  them  anything  but  real    Highlanders,  or  even  Scotchmen 
(which  is  not  strictly  synonymous) ;  and  the  colonels  themselves  being 
generally  unacquainted  with  the  language  and  habits  of  Highlanders, 
while  prejudiced  in  favour  of,  and  accustomed  to  wear,  breeches,  con- 
sequently averse  to  that  free  congenial  circulation  of  that  pure  whole- 
some air  (as  an  exhilarating  native  bracer),  which  has  hitherto  so 
peculiarly  benefitted  the  Highlander  for  activity  and  all  the  other 
necessary  qualities  of  a  soldier,  whether  for  hardship  upon  scanty  fare, 
readiness  in  accoutring,   or  making   forced    marches, — besides   the 
exclusive  advantage,  when  halted,  of  drenching  his  kilt  in  the  next 
brook,  as  well  as  washing  his  limbs,  and  drying  both,  as  it  were,  by 
constant  fanning,  without  injury  to  either,  but,  on  the  contrary,  feel- 
ing clean  and  comfortable ;    whilst  the  buffoon  tartan  pantaloon,  with 
its  fringed  frippery  (as  some  mongrel  Highlanders  would  have  it), 
sticking  wet  and  dirty  to  the  skin,  is  not  very  easily  pulled  off,  and 
less  so  to  get  on  again  in  case  of  alarm  or  any  other  hurry,  and  all 
this  time  absorbing  both  wet  and  dirt,  followed  by  rheumatism  and 
fevers,  which  alternately  make  great  havoc  in  hot  and  cold  climates ; 
while  it  consists  with  knowledge,  that  the  Highlander  in  his  native 
garb  always  appeared  more  cleanly,  and  maintained  better  health  in 
both  climates  than  those  who  wore  even  the  thick  cloth  pantaloon. — 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  25 

Independent  of  these  circumstances,  I  feel  no  hesitation  in  saying 
that  the  proposed  alteration  must  have  proceeded  from  a  whimsical 
idea,  more  than  from  the  real  comfort  of  the  Highland  soldier,  and  a  . 
wish  to  lay  aside  that  national  martial  garb,  the  very  sight  of  which 
has,  upon  many  occasions,  struck  the  enemy  with  terror  and  confusion, 
and  now  metamorphose  the  Highlander  from  his  real  characteristic 
appearance  and  comfort  in  an  odious  incompatible  dress,  to  which  it 
will,  in  my  opinion,  be  difficult  to  reconcile  him,  as  a  poignant  griev- 
ance to  and  a  galling  reflection  upon  Highland  corps,  as  levelling  that 
martial  distinction  by  which  they  have  been  hitherto  noticed  and 
respected, — and  from  my  own  experience,  I  feel  well  founded  in  say- 
ing that  if  anything  was  wanted  to  aid  the  rack-renting  Highland 
landlord  in  destroying  that  source  which  has  hitherto  proved  so  fruit- 
ful in  keeping  up  Highland  corps,  it  will  be  that  of  abolishing  their 
native  garb,  which  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief  and 
the  Adjutant-General  may  rest  assured  will  prove  a  complete  death- 
warrant  to  the  recruiting  service  in  that  respect ;  but  I  sincerely  hope 
His  Royal  Highness  will  never  acquiesce  in  so  painful  and  degrading  an 
idea  (come  from  whatever  quarter  it  may)  as  to  strip  us  of  our  native 
garb,  (admitted  hitherto  our  regimental  uniform,)  and  stuff  us  in  a 
harlequin  tartan  pantaloon,  which,  composed  of  the  usual  quality  that 
continues  as  at  present  worn,  useful  and  becoming  for  twelve  months, 
will  not  endure  six  weeks'  fair  wear  as  a  pantaloon,  and  when  patched 
makes  a  horrible  appearance ;  besides  that,  the  necessary  quantity  to 
serve  decently  throughout  the  year  would  become  extremely  expensive, 
but,  above  all,  take  away  completely  the  appearance  and  conceit  of  a 
Highland  soldier,  in  which  case  I  would  rather  see  him  stuffed  in 
breeches  and  abolish  the  distinction  altogether. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir,  &c., 

(Signed)  "ALAN  CAMERON." 

"  To  Henry  Thorpe,  Esq." 

This  ridiculous  proposal  to  abolish  the  kilt  was  then  dropped. 

1805. 

The  first  battalion  performed  garrison  duty  in  various  stations  in 
Ireland,  until  the  month  of  November,  when  it  sailed  from  Monks- 


26  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

town  for  England,  and,  landing  at  Ramsgate,  marched  to  Ospringe 
barracks. 

1806. 

In  the  month  of  January,  1806,  the  regiment  marched  from 
Ospringe  barracks  to  London,  where  it  formed  part  of  the  procession 
attending  the  funeral  of  Vice- Admiral  Lord  Nelson.  After  the  funeral 
the  regiment  marched  to  Colchester  barracks,  which  it  occupied  till 
May  following,  when  it  marched  to  Weeley  barracks. 

1807. 

In  February  the  regiment  moved  from  Weeley  to  Harwich  barracks, 
when,  on  the  8th  of  April,  it  had  the  great  misfortune  to  lose  Captain 
Dawson,  3  Sergeants,  and  56  rank  and  file,  in  crossing  from  Land- 
guard  Fort  to  Harwich,  the  vessel  conveying  them  having  been  upset 
in  a  sudden  squall. 

The  regiment  having  been  completed  to  1,000  rank  and  file  by  a 
draft  from  the  2nd  battalion,  which  remained  in  Scotland,  embarked 
at  Harwich  on  the  26th  of  July  on  an  expedition  to  be  employed 
against  Denmark,  under  Lieutenant-General  the  Earl  Cathcart,  and 
arrived  in  Elsinore  roads  on  he  3rd  of  August.  The  Cameron 
Highlanders  landed  at  Zealand  on  the  16th,  and  marched  with  other 
troops  to  Frederickswerk,  in  the  vicinity  of  Copenhagen.  All  attempts 
at  negotiation  having  failed,  the  trenches  were  opened  against  the 
City  of  Copenhagen  on  the  2nd  of  September,  and  a  vigorous 
bombardment  continued  without  intermission  both  by  sea  and  land 
until  the  7th,  when  the  proposed  terms  were  acceded  to  and  the  city 
capitulated.  On  the  surrender,  Colonel  Cameron  of  the  79th  was 
directed  to  take  possession  of  the  citadel  with  the  flank  companies  of 
the  army ;  and  the  objects  of  the  expedition  being  fully  accomplished, 
the  troops  embarked  for  England  in  the  month  of  October.  The 
regiment  sailed  in  three  Danish  prizes,  the  "  Mars"  the  "  Fuen"  and 
"  frega"  and  landed  at  Deal  and  Yarmouth  in  November  following, 
proceeding  to  Weeley  barracks. 

The  only  casualties  in  the  regiment  during  the  bombardment  of 
Copenhagen  were  4  rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  thanks  of  both  Houses  of  Parliament  were  unanimously  voted 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  27 

to  the  army  for  the  manner  in  which  this  service  was  performed,  and 
the  following  letter  was  received  by  Colonel  Cameron  from  Lieutenant- 
General  Lord  Cathcart : — 

"  Gloucester  Place, 

"  1st  February,  1808. 
"SIR, 

"  I  take  the  earliest  opportunity  of  transmitting  to  you 
a  copy  of  the  resolutions  of  the  House  of  Lords,  and  those  of  the 
House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  January,  1808,  which  contain  the 
thanks  of  both  Houses  of  Parliament  to  the  army  lately  employed  in 
Zealand.  In  communicating  to  you  this  most  signal  mark  of  the 
approbation  of  the  Parliament  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland,  allow  me  to  add  my  warmest  congratulations 
upon  a  distinction  which  the  battalion  under  your  command  had  so 
great  a  share  in  obtaining  for  His  Majesty's  Service,  together  with  the 
assurance  of  the  truth  and  regard  with  which  I  have  the  honour  to 

be,  etc., 

(Signed)  "  CATHCART, 

"  Lieutenant-General." 
"  To  Colonel  Cameron, 

"  79th  Highlanders." 

1808. 

In  the  month  of  May,  1808,  the  regiment  embarked  at  Harwich  on 
an  expedition  to  Sweden,  consisting  of  ten  thousand  troops,  under  the 
command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir  John  Moore,  in  virtue  of  a  stip- 
ulation of  the  subsidiary  treaty  existing  between  Great  Britain  and  that 
country.  On  the  17th  the  fleet  with  the  troops  on  board  dropped 
anchor  in  Gottenburgh  roads,  and  Sir  John  Moore  proceeded  to  Stock- 
holm ;  but  finding  from  the  views  of  His  Majesty,  the  King  of  Sweden, 
that  the  required  service  was  unsuited  to  the  limited  army  under  his 
command,  he  refused  to  debark  the  troops,  and  returned  to  Gotten- 
burgh, after  narrowly  escaping  being  made  a  prisoner  by  the  eccentric 
and  enraged  monarch.  The  fleet  thereupon  sailed  for  England,  and 
arrived  at  Spithead  early  in  July,  where,  without  being  permitted  to 
land,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  ordered  to  proceed,  with  other 


28  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

reinforcements  then  assembling  at  Portsmouth  under  the  command 
of  Sir  Harry  Burrard,  to  join  the  army  in  Portugal  operating  against 
the  French  in  that  country.  After  a  delay  of  several  weeks  occupied 
in  taking  in  provisions  and  water,  the  fleet  sailed  from  Spithead  on 
the  31st  of  July,  and  on  the  26th  of  August  the  regiment  landed  at 
Maceira  Bay,  and  proceeded  to  join  the  army  then  encamped  in  the 
neighbourhood  of  Lisbon.  The  convention  of  Cintra  immediately 
followed,  producing  a  complete  cessation  of  hostilities  in  that  quarter  ; 
and  the  79th,  as  part  of  Major-General  Fane's  brigade,  was  incorpo- 
rated in  the  army,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir 
John  Moore,  destined  to  co-operate  with  the  Spanish  army  of  the 
Marquis  de  Romana,  with  a  view  of  rescuing  the  country  from  French 
domination. 

This  closed  the  services  of  Colonel  Alan  Cameron  as  a  regimental 
officer, — the  appointment  of  Commandant  of  Lisbon,  together  with 
the  rank  of  Brigadier-General,  having  been  conferred  upon  him.  His 
personal  command  of  the  regiment  therefore  ceased  after  fifteen 
years  of  unremitting  and  unwearied  zeal  in  the  public  service,  sharing 
its  every  privation,  and  his  almost  paternal  anxiety  for  his  native 
Highlanders  had  never  permitted  him  to  be  absent  from  their  head. 
He  finally  resigned  the  command  of  the  regiment  into  the  hands  of 
his  eldest  son,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Philips  Cameron,  who  henceforth 
assumed  command  of  the  corps. 

The  army  of  Sir  John  Moore  having  advanced  by  rapid  marches 
into  Spain,  and  being  joined  at  Mayorga  by  the  division  of  Sir  David 
Baird  from  Corunna,  the  whole  proceeded  as  far  as  Sahagun  ;  but 
here  Sir  John  Moore  received  reliable  information  that  three  several 
French  Corps  d'Armee,  one  of  them  commanded  by  Napoleon  in 
person,  and  each  exceeding  his  own  army  in  numerical  strength,  were 
advancing  from  different  points  to  attack  him.  This  information, 
together  with  the  total  dispersion  of  Romana's  army,  and  the  apathy 
of  the  Spanish  authorities,  determined  Sir  John  Moore  to  make  a 
retrograde  movement  through  Gallicia,  and  the  ever  memorable 
although  disastrous  retreat  to  Corunna  ensued,  throughout  which 
severe  service  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  not  exceeded  in 
discipline  and  efficiency  by  any  other  corps. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  29 

1809. 

In  the  brilliant  action  of  Corunna  on  the  16th  of  January,  1809, 
the  regiment  had  not  the  honour  to  be  engaged.  It  belonged  to  the 
Division  of  Lieutenant-General  Fraser,  which  held  the  heights 
immediately  in  front  of  the  gates  of  Corunna,  to  repel  any  attack  in 
that  quarter ;  consequently  it  was  not  brought  into  action.  The  light 
company,  however,  with  the  other  light  troops  of  the  division,  was 
engaged  in  skirmishing  with  the  enemy,  near  the  village  of  Elvina, 
but  suffered  no  loss. 

The  troops  embarked  successfully  after  the  battle,  and  the  fleet 
sailed  that  evening  for  England. 

The  gallant  Sir  John  Moore,  who  was  mortally  wounded  in  the 
action,  was  buried  on  shore  before  the  troops  left. 

When  information  reached  Lisbon  that  Sir  John  Moore's  army  in 
Spain  was  being  hard  pressed  by  an  overwhelming  force  of  the  enemy, 
Major-General  Alan  Cameron  was  ordered  to  advance  with  all  the 
troops  that  could  be  collected  to  effect  a  junction  with  him.  General 
Cameron  marched  on  the  27th  December,  1808,  to  Almeida,  and 
thence  for  a  considerable  distance  into  Spain,  when  the  news  of  Sir 
John  Moore's  retreat  on  Corunna  placed  him  and  his  force  in  a  most 
critical  position.  However,  he  successfully  conducted  his  force  back 
to  Lisbon,  although  it  underwent  the  greatest  hardships  and  privations 
during  the  retreat.  On  his  return  to  Lisbon  General  Cameron  was 
confined  to  hospital  for  two  months  by  a  severe  fever,  induced,  no 
doubt,  by  exposure. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  landed  in  England  in  February,  1809, 
at  Portsmouth,  and  marched  to  Weeley  barracks.  Here  fever, 
probably  owing  its  origin  to  causes  connected  with  the  fatigues  and 
sufferings  undergone  in  the  recent  retreat,  immediately  attacked  the 
regiment,  and  many  men  fell  victims  to  its  ravages.  In  a  few  weeks, 
however,  after  its  outbreak  it  began  to  decline,  and  in  about  a  month 
entirely  disappeared. 

In  June  following,  the  regiment  was  completed  to  1,000  rank  and 
file  by  a  draft  of  258  men  from  the  2nd  battalion  ;  and  being  again  in 
the  highest  order,  it  embarked  at  Harwich  on  the  15th  of  July  on  a 
combined  naval  and  military  expedition  then  fitting  out  under  Admiral 


30  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Sir  Richard  Strachan  and  Lieutenant-General  the  Earl  of  Chatham, 
having  for  its  object  the  destruction  of  the  French  arsenals  and 
shipping  on  the  Scheldt.  During  this  service  it  was  brigaded  with 
the  llth  and  50th  regiments,  under  the  command  of  Major-General 
Leith. 

Having  landed  at  Veer  (which  had  just  surrendered)  on  the  2nd 
of  August,  it  marched  through  Middleburgh  to  the  lines  before 
Flushing,  where  it  bivouacked  in  the  open  fields. 

After  an  incessant  bombardment  from  the  13th  till  the  15th  of 
August,  the  French  garrison  capitulated,  and  marched  out  and  laid 
down  its  arms  on  the  19th.  In  the  service  in  the  trenches  the 
regiment  suffered  no  loss,  and  on  the  19th  it  proceeded  with  other 
troops  up  the  Scheldt,  with  the  design  of  attacking  Antwerp  and 
the  fleet  there ;  but  this  having  been  found  from  various  causes 
impracticable,  and  the  army  suffering  dreadfully  from  fever,  the 
expedition  returned  to  England. 

During  these  operations  in  the  Low  Countries,  a  detachment  of  the 
79th,  consisting  of  the  sick  left  at  Lisbon  when  the  army  of  Sir  John 
Moore  marched  into  Spain,  and  those  left  behind  on  the  retreat  to 
Corunna,  amounting  to  5  officers,  4  sergeants,  and  45  rank  and  file — 
had,  together  with  officers  and  men  of  other  corps  similarly  situated, 
been  formed  into  a  corps  designated  the  first  battalion  of  detachments. 
This  was  placed  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Bunbury, 
and  was  warmly  engaged  at  the  battle  of  Talavera  on  the  27th  and 
28th  of  July,  1809.  The  loss  of  the  contingent  of  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  was  very  severe,  being  14  rank  and  file  killed;  1  sergeant 
and  27  rank  and  file  wounded,  and  Lieutenant  John  Campbell  Cameron 
missing, — a  clear  proof  that  it  bore  its  full  share  in  the  brunt  of  battle 
on  that  hard-fought  field. 

Lieutenant  Cameron  was  taken  prisoner  by  the  French,  but  made 
his  escape  during  the  night  and  returned  to  his  detachment.  During 
these  operations,  Major-General  Alan  Cameron,  who  commanded  a 
brigade  at  the  battle  of  Talavera,  had  the  sad  misfortune  to  lose  the 
youngest  of  his  three  sons — Lieutenant  Ewen  Cameron  of  the  79th — 
who  was  acting  as  his  aide-de-camp.  He  died  of  fever  at  Lisbon, 
brought  on  by  hardship  and  exposure, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  31 

The  79th,  returning  from  the  Scheldt,  disembarked  at  Harwich  in 
the  month  of  September,  1809,  and  marched  to  Weeley  barracks. 
Notwithstanding  the  great  mortality  that  prevailed  in  the  army  during 
the  occupation  of  the  Island  of  Walcheren,  the  regiment  lost  only 
Paymaster  Baldock  and  one  private  from  the  effects  of  the  climate  ; 
but,  upon  its  return  to  Weeley,  it  is  remarkable  that,  for  the  second 
time  in  the  same  year  under  nearly  similar  circumstances,  the 
regiment  was  again  attacked  with  fever,  which  occasioned  several 
deaths  ;  and  2  officers  and  42  men  not  being  sufficiently  recovered, 
were  left  behind  and  transferred  to  the  2nd  battalion  when  the 
regiment  marched  to  Portsmouth  to  embark  for  Portugal  in  December 
following.* 

1810. 

The  regiment,  reinforced  by  a  draft  of  60  men  from  the  2nd 
battalion,  was  ordered  to  join  the  army  acting  in  Portugal  under  the  . 
command  of  Sir  Arthur  Wellesley,  and  having  accordingly  embarked 
at  Portsmouth  in  January,  it  arrived  at  Lisbon  on  the  31st  of  the 
same  month,  but  had  scarcely  landed  when  it  was  again  ordered  to 
re-embark  for  Cadiz  to  assist  in  the  defence  of  that  city,  which  was 
closely  blockaded  on  the  land  side  by  the  French,  under  Marshal 
Victor. 

The  regiment  landed  at  Cadiz  on  the  12th  of  February,  and  was 
quartered  in  the  convent  of  "  Del  Carmen,"  in  the  town  of  La  Isla  de 
Leon,  the  most  advanced  position  occupied  by  the  British  troops. 

*  In  1809  the  79th  accomplished  what  no  other  regiment  did.  In  January  of 
that  year  they  were  in  Spain  at  the  battle  of  Corunna,  and  returned  to  England  in 
February,  when  700  men  and  several  officers  suffered  from  a  dangerous  typhus 
fever,  yet  not  a  man  died.  In  July  they  embarked  1,002  bayonets  for  Walcheren, 
were  engaged  durit:g  the  whole  seige  of  Flushing  in  the  trenches,  yet  had  not  a 
man  wounded,  and  whilst  there  lost  only  one  individual  of  fever — Paymaster 
Baldock,  the  least  expected  of  any  one. 

"  During  the  three  months  after  their  return  to  England,  only  ten  men  died,  and 
in  December  of  the  same  year  again  embarked  for  the  Peninsula  1,032  strong." — 
Vide  Smith's  list  of  officers  of  the  79th. 

It  should,  however,  be  stated  that  during  the  disastrous  retreat  to  Corunna 
the  79th  lost  90  officers,  N.C,  officers,  and  men  by  death  or  as  prisoners  of  war, 


32  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

On  the  16th  of  March  Sir  Thomas  Graham,  intending  to  attack 
the  advanced  French  position  of  the  Trocadero,  with  a  view  of  dis- 
lodging them  from  the  isthmus  of  that  name,  ordered  a  company  of 
the  79th,  under  Captain  Donald  Cameron,  across  a  small  river  called 
the  Sancti  Pietri  to  effect  a  diversion  in  favour  of  his  main  attack  ; 
but  this  having  been  abandoned  in  consequence  of  the  General's 
design  being  betrayed  to  the  enemy,  the  company  was  recalled,  after 
having  Lieutenants  Patrick  McCrummen  and  Donald  Cameron  and  25 
rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  79th  continued  in  garrison  at  Cadiz  until  the  16th  of  August, 
when,  the  city  being  considered  safe  from  further  attack  and  the 
services  of  the  regiment  being  required  in  Portugal,  it  embarked  on 
that  date  and  landed  at  Lisbon  on  the  29th.  Having  been  supplied 
with  all  necessary  field  equipment,  it  was  despatched  up  the  country 
on  the  8th  of  September,  and  joined  the  army,  under  Lord  Wellington, 
at  Busaco  on  the  25th,  when  it  was  brigaded  with  the  7th  and  61st 
regiments  under  the  command  of  Major-General  Alan  Cameron. 

The  French  Army  commanded  by  Marshal  Massena  having  pos- 
sessed itself  of  Ciudad  Rodrigo  and  Almeida,  had  penetrated  to 
the  Sierra  de  Busaco,  where,  in  order  to  resist  his  further  advance, 
Lord  Wellington  had  chosen  a  favourable  position.  The  79th  with 
its  division  was  posted  on  the  extreme  right  of  the  line,  which 
extended  along  the  Sierra  de  Busaco.  Picquets  from  the  division 
forming  an  advanced  communicating  chain  were  thrown  out  in 
front,  down  the  steep  and  rugged  declivity  on  the  crest  of  which 
the  army  was  posted. 

At  daybreak  on  the  27th  of  September  the  French  columns  of 
attack  advanced  against  the  right  of  the  English  line  with  great  im- 
petuosity, headed  by  a  swarm  of  skirmishers  who  quickly  drove  in  the 
advanced  posts,  and  from  their  numerical  superiority  had  nearly  sur- 
rounded and  cut  off  the  picquet  of  the  79th,  when  Captain  Neil 
Douglas  gallantly  volunteered  with  his  company  to  go  to  its  support, 
and  opening  fire  from  a  favourable  position  checked  the  enemy's  ad- 
vance and  enabled  the  picquet  to  retire  in  good  order.  Unfortunately, 
however,  Captain  Alexander  Cameron,  who  commanded  the  picquet, 
was  killed.  This  gallant  officer  would  not  withdraw.  He  was  last 


79TH    CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  33 

seen  by  Captain  (afterwards  the  late  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Neil) 
Douglas,  fighting  hand  to  hand  with  several  French  soldiers,  to 
whom  he  refused  to  deliver  his  sword.  His  body  was  found  pierced 
with  seven  bayonet  wounds. 

The  attack  in  this  quarter  was  however  soon  abandoned  and 
directed  chiefly  upon  the  centre  and  left  of  the  army.  The  regi- 
ment therefore  had  no  further  share  in  the  subsequent  operations 
of  this  victorious  day.  Its  loss  was,  nevertheless,  very  severe  in 
proportion  to  the  small  number  engaged,  being  Captain  Alexander 
Cameron  and  7  rank  and  file  killed,  Captain  Neil  Douglas  and 
41  rank  and  file  wounded,  and  6  rank  and  file  missing.  Captain 
Neil  Douglas  was  wounded  in  his  shoulder,  the  ball  being  extracted 
on  the  field. 

The  day  after  the  battle,  Massena  having  made  a  flank  march  to 
Boyaloa  to  turn  Lord  Wellington's  left,  the  army  retreated  in  perfect 
order  upon  the  celebrated  lines  of  Torres  Vedras,  which  it  reached 
on  the  8th  of  October,  followed  by  the  enemy,  who  found  in  them  a 
barrier  to  his  further  advance. 

This  closed  the  long  and  honourable  military  career  of  that  most 
distinguished  soldier  Major-General  Alan  Cameron  after  nearly  forty 
years'  service — twenty-two  of  which  had  been  spent  on  active  service 
in  the  field.  Finding  that  his  health  was  utterly  shattered,  he  reluct- 
antly resigned  the  command  of  his  brigade,  and  proceeded  to  England, 
consoling  himself  with  the  thought  that  he  left  his  devoted  High- 
landers under  the  care  and  guidance  of  his  eldest  son,  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Philips  Cameron. 

The  army  remained  inactive  and  unmolested  in  camp  till  the  14th 
of  November,  when  the  French  army  being  excessively  straitened  for 
provisions,  its  ranks  becoming  constantly  thinned  by  disease  and 
desertion,  and  being  wholly  foiled  in  his  project  of  turning  the  posi- 
tion of  Torres  Vedras,  Massena  broke  up  his  camp  silently  at  night 
and  began  to  retire  upon  Santarem. 

The  British  army  followed  rapidly  in  pursuit,  by  divisions,  upon 
Alemquer,  Cartaxo,  and  Elvalle.  At  Cartaxo  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
were  joined  by  a  draft  from  the  2nd  battalion  of  2  sergeants  and  83 
rank  and  file,  under  Captain  Andrew  Brown. 

' 


34  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

The  pursuit  of  the  French  army  was  continued  with  great  activity 
until  its  arrival  at  Santarem,  where  Lord  Wellington  judged  it  inex- 
pedient to  attack  it  in  that  precipitous  and  formidable  position. 

1811. 

On  the  5th  of  March,  1811,  the  enemy  broke  up  his  camp  at 
Santarem  and  resumed  his  retreat,  when  the  army  again  moved  for- 
ward in  close  and  rapid  pursuit.  Several  partial  actions  occurred  with 
the  French  rear-guard ;  and  in  a  severe  skirmish  at  Foz  d'Aronce,  on 
the  15th  of  March,  the  light  company  of  the  79th  attached  to  the 
light  division  of  the  army  was  engaged  from  4  p.m.  until  dark,  when 
the  enemy  was  driven  across  the  river  Ceira  with  great  loss.  In  this 
affair,  Lieutenant  Kenneth  Cameron  of  the  79th  captured  the  lieu- 
tenant-colonel of  the  39th  French  infantry,  and  conveyed  him  a 
prisoner  to  head-quarters.  The  light  company  had  2  rank  and  file 
killed  and  7  rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  enemy  finally  re-entered  Spain  on  the  4th  of  April,  and  on  the 
2nd  of  May,  Massena,  desirous  of  relieving  Almeida,  which  Lord 
Wellington  had  invested,  advanced  his  army  to  a  position  in  front  of 
the  Duas  Casas  and  Fuentes  D'Onor.  The  English  position  was 
a  line  whose  left  extended  beyond  the  brook  of  Onoro,  resting  on 
a  hill  supported  by  fort  Conception ;  the  right,  which  was  more  acces- 
sible, was  at  Nave  d'Aver,  and  the  centre  at  Villa  Formosa. 

On  the  afternoon  of  the  3rd  of  May,  Massena  made  various  attacks 
upon  several  parts  of  the  English  position;  but  it  soon  became 
apparent  that  his  grand  object  was  to  carry  the  village  of  Fuentes 
D'Onor,  and  thereby  turn  the  British  right  flank.  This  village,  which 
is  situated  in  a  valley,  with  several  detached  buildings  on  high  ground 
at  its  upper  extremity,  was  entrusted  to  the  71st  and  79th  Highlanders, 
with  the  24th  regiment  and  several  light  companies  in  support, 
the  whole  commanded  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  Philips  Cameron  of 
the  79th.  The  enemy  having  advanced  in  great  force,  succeeded, 
from  his  numerical  superiority,  in  gaining  a  temporary  possession  of 
several  parts  of  the  village ;  but  after  a  succession  of  most  bloody 
hand-to-hand  encounters,  he  was  completely  driven  from  it  at  night- 
fall, when  darkness  put  an  end  to  the  conflict.  The  various  light 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  35 

companies  were  then  withdrawn,  leaving  it  occupied  by  the  24th,  71st, 
and  79th  regiments. 

The  whole  of  the  following  day  was  occupied  by  Massena  in  making 
dispositions  for  a  renewal  of  the  attack,  and  early  on  the  morning  of 
the  5th  the  enemy  again  advanced  in  great  force  on  several  parts  of 
the  British  position  ;  but  his  most  strenuous  efforts  were  directed 
again  on  Fuentes  D'Onor ;  however,  notwithstanding  that  the  whole 
sixth  French  Corps  d'Armee  was  at  different  periods  engaged  in  the 
attack,  the  enemy  never  succeeded  in  gaining  more  than  a  temporary 
possession  of  the  village.  Its  lower  portion  was  however  completely 
carried,  and  two  companies  of  the  79th,  which  had  become  separated 
from  the  main  body  in  the  struggle,  were  surrounded  and  made  pri- 
soners ;  but  the  troops  still  held  the  upper  and  much  larger  portion, 
where  a  fierce  and  bloody  hand-to-hand  combat  was  maintained  with 
the  French  Imperial  Guard,  part  of  the  Corps  d'Elite  of  Napoleon 
Buonaparte,  the  Highlanders  in  numerous  instances  clubbing  their 
muskets  and  using  the  butts  instead  of  their  bayonets,  so  close  and 
deadly  was  the  nature  of  the  strife  maintained.  About  this  period  of 
the  action  a  French  soldier  was  observed  to  step  aside  into  a  doorway 
and  take  deliberate  aim  at  Colonel  Cameron,  who  fell  from  his  horse 
mortally  wounded.  A  cry  of  grief  and  revenge  arose  from  the  High- 
landers, who  called  in  Gaelic  to  their  comrades  of  the  71st,  "  Thuit 
an  Camshronach"*  and  the  two  Highland  regiments,  supported  by  the 
88th  Connaught  Rangers  and  74th  Highlanders,  hurled  themselves 
upon  the  French.  The  excitement  amongst  the  88th  and  74th  men, 
who  also  spoke  Gaelic,  was  intense  when  they  heard  that  it  was 
"  Cia  Mar  thds  "  son,f  who  was  being  carried  to  the  rear.  The  French 
were  driven  with  great  slaughter  out  of  the  village,  and  the  High- 
landers being  then  withdrawn  were  replaced  by  a  brigade  of  the  light 
division. 

During   these   two    sanguinary   days,   besides   Lieutenant-Colonel 

*  "Cameron  has  fallen." 

f  Sir  Alan  Cameron  was  known  amongst  the  men  of  the  Highland  regiments  by 
the  soubriquet  of  "  Old  Cia  Mar  tha,"  in  consequence  of  almost  invariable  habit  of 
addressing  them  with  the  Gaelic  salute  of  "  Cia  Mar  tha  thu"  ("How  are  you  ?")— 

Mackenzie's  "History  of  the  Cameron*." 


36  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

Philips  Cameron,  mortally  wounded,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had 
Captain  William  Imlach,  1  sergeant,  and  30  rank  and  file  killed; 
Captains  Malcolm  Fraser  and  Sinclair  Davidson ;  Lieutenants  James 
Sinclair,  John  Calder,  Archibald  Fraser,  Alexander  Cameron,  John 
Webb,  and  Fulton  Robertson ;  Ensigns  Charles  Brown  and  Duncan 
Cameron;  6  sergeants  and  138  rank  and  file  wounded;  2  sergeants 
and  92  rank  and  file  missing.  After  this  return  it  was  found  that  most 
of  those  returned  as  missing  had  been  killed  in  the  village.  Captain 
Sinclair  Davidson  and  13  rank  and  file  died  of  their  wounds  the  fol- 
lowing day. 

The  brevet  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel  and  the  distinction  of  a  gold 
medal  was  conferred  upon  Major  Alexander  Petrie,  who  succeeded  to 
the  command  of  the  regiment  after  Colonel  Cameron  was  wounded ; 
the  senior  captain  (Andrew  Brown)  was  promoted  to  the  brevet  rank 
of  major  in  the  army ;  and  the  regiment  received  the  royal  authority 
to  bears  on  its  colours  and  appointments  the  words  "  Fuentes  d*  Onor" 
in  addition  to  its  other  distinctions.  For  its  distinguished  services 
the  regiment  likewise  received  the  particular  commendation  of  Lord 
Wellington,  as  proved  by  the  following  letter  from  the  military 
secretary  to  the  officer  commanding  : — 

"Villa  Formosa,  8th  May,  1811. 
"SIR, 

"I  am  directed  by  Lord  Wellington  to  acquaint  you  that  he 
will  have  great  pleasure  in  submitting  to  the  Commander-in-Chief,  for 
a  commission,  the  name  of  any  non-commissioned  officer  of  the  79th 
regiment  whom  you  may  recommend,  as  his  lordship  is  anxious  to 
mark  his  sense  of  the  conduct  of  the  79th  during  the  late  engagement 
with  the  enemy. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  etc., 

(Signed]         "  FITZROY  SOMERSET." 
"  Major  Petrie,  commanding 
"79th  Highlanders." 

In  consequence  of  the  above  communication,  sergeant  Donald 
Mclntosh  was  recommended  for  a  commission,  and  was  appointed 
ensign  in  the  88th  regiment  on  the  4th  of  June,  1811, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  37 

In  Massena's  despatch  to  the  French  war  minister,  giving  an  account 
of  the  battle,  the  following  singular  passage  occurs,  evincing  his  sense 
of  the  share  borne  by  the  Scotch  regiments  in  his  defeat  on  both  days 
of  the  battle  :— 

"  They  (the  British)  lost  500  prisoners,  and  had  more  than  800 
killed,  among  whom  are  many  officers  and  Scots." 

The  gallant  Colonel  Cameron,  as  previously  stated,  was  the  eldest 
son  of  Major-General  Alan  Cameron,  the  founder  of  the  corps,  and 
an  officer  of  much  professional  talent  and  promise.  So  highly  was  he 
esteemed  by  Lord  Wellington,  that  his  lordship,  with  his  whole  staff, 
and  also  all  the  generals  within  reach,  attended  his  funeral,  which  was 
conducted  with  military  honours. 

Sir  Walter  Scott,  in  his  "  Vision  of  Don  Roderick"  alludes  to  the 
circumstances  of  Colonel  Cameron's  death  in  the  following  lines  : — 

"  And  what  avails  thee  that,  for  Cameron  slain, 

Wild  from  the  plaided  ranks  the  yell  was  given  ? 
Vengeance  and  grief  gave  mountain  rage  the  rein, 
And,  at  the  bloody  spear-point  headlong  driven, 
Thy  despot's  giant  guards  fled  like  the  rack  of  heaven." 

The  following  note  to  the  above  lines,  by  Sir  Walter  Scott,  is  also 
interesting : — 

"  The  gallant  Colonel  Cameron  was  wounded  mortally  during  the 
desperate  contest  in  the  streets  of  the  village  called  Fuentes  d'Onor. 
He  fell  at  the  head  of  his  native  Highlanders,  the  71st  and  79th,  who 
raised  a  dreadful  shriek  of  grief  and  rage.  They  charged  with  irresist- 
ible fury  the  finest  body  of  French  Grenadiers  ever  seen,  being  a  part 
of  Buonaparte's  selected  guard.  The  officer  who  led  the  French,  a 
man  remarkable  for  stature  and  symmetry,  was  killed  on  the  spot. 
The  Frenchman  who  stepped  out  of  his  rank  to  take  aim  at  Colonel 
Cameron  was  also  bayonetted,  pierced  with  a  thousand  wounds,  and 
almost  torn  to  pieces  by  the  furious  Highlanders,  who,  under  the  com- 
mand of  Colonel  Cadogan,  bore  the  enemy  out  of  the  contested 
ground  at  the  point  of  the  bayonet." — Note  by  Sir  Walter  Scott. 

As  Colonel  Cameron  was  much  and  deeply  lamented,  and  as  his 
character  and  conduct  were  intimately  identified  with  that  of  the 


38  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

regiment,  the  following  copies  of  letters  to  his  father,  Major-General 
Alan  Cameron,  are  selected  from  amongst  the  many  sent  to  him  at 
that  time  by  officers  of  distinction  : — 

"  Villa  Formosa, 

"15th  May,  1811. 

"  MY  DEAR  GENERAL, 

"  When  I  wrote  to  you  last  week,  I  felt  that  I  conveyed  to  you 
information  which  would  give  you  great  pain  ;  but  I  hoped  that  I 
made  you  acquainted  with  the  fullest  extent  of  the  misfortune  which 
had  befallen  you.  Unfortunately,  however,  those  upon  whose  judg- 
ment I  relied  were  deceived  ;  your  son's  wound  was  worse  than  it 
was  supposed  to  be — it  was  mortal,  and  he  died  the  day  before 
yesterday  at  two  in  the  morning. 

"  I  am  convinced  that  you  will  credit  the  assurance  which  I  give 
you  that  I  condole  with  you  most  sincerely  upon  this  misfortune,  of 
the  extent  of  which  no  man  is  more  capable  than  myself  of  forming 
an  estimate,  from  the  knowledge  which  I  had,  and  the  just  estimate 
which  I  had  formed  in  my  own  opinion,  of  the  merits  of  your  son. 

"  You  will,  I  am  convinced,  always  regret  and  lament  his  loss  ;  but 
I  hope  you  will  derive  some  consolation  from  the  reflection  that  he 
fell  in  the  performance  of  his  duty,  at  the  head  of  your  brave  regiment, 
loved  and  respected  by  all  who  knew  him,  in  an  action  in  which,  if 
possible,  the  British  troops  surpassed  anything  they  had  ever  done 
before,  and  of  which  the  result  was  most  honourable  to  his  Majesty's 
arms. 

"  At  all  events,  if  Providence  had  decreed  to  deprive  you  of  your 
son,  I  cannot  conceive  a  string  of  circumstances  more  honourable  and 
glorious  than  those  under  which  he  lost  his  life  in  the  cause  of  his 
country. 

"  Believe  me,  however,  that  although  I  am  fully  alive  to  all  the 
honourable  circumstances  attending  his  death,  I  most  sincerely  condole 
with  you  upon  your  loss,  and  that  I  ever  am, 

"  Yours  most  sincerely, 
(Signed)  "  WELLINGTON." 

"  Major-General  Alan  Cameron,  etc." 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  39 

"  Villa  Formosa, 

"  15th  May,  1811. 

"  MY  DEAR  SIR, 

"  If  anything  can  alleviate  the  distress  of  mind  you  must  now 
labour  under,  it  must  be  the  concurrent  sentiments  of  regret  and 
approbation  of  the  gallant  conduct  of  your  ever-to-be-) amented  son 
which  reign  throughout  the  whole  of  this  army.  I  should  forbear  to 
have  intruded  upon  you  at  this  moment,  if  I  did  not  believe  that  the 
expressions  of  these  feelings  would  afford  you  a  ray  of  consolation,  and, 
in  addition  to  my  situation,  which  affords  me  an  opportunity  of 
knowing  and  detailing  to  you  what  we  all  experience  of  grief  mixed 
with  admiration,  my  personal  regard  towards  you  prompts  me  to 
trouble  you  even  at  such  a  crisis. 

"  Your  own  heroism  and  fortitude,  my  dear  Sir,  is  now  more  than 
ever  put  to  the  test,  and  I  fervently  hope  that  they  will  carry  you 
through  your  severe  trial. 

"  I  was  by  the  side  of  your  intrepid  son,  and  by  his  equally  intrepid 
79th,  on  the  evening  of  the  3rd,  in  the  gallant  defence  of  Fuentes. 
I  witnessed  him  there  in  the  hottest  fire  only  adding  to  his  men's 
excellent  conduct  by  his  coolness,  foresight,  and  bravery.  I  estimated 
him  still  higher  than  I  did  before ;  and  when  I  heard  on  the  5th  of 
his  fall  at  his  fatal  post,  being  myself  then  in  another  part  of  the  field, 
I  hardly  know  an  event  that  could  have  occurred  to  have  given 
more  pain. 

"  We  endeavoured,  and  Lord  Wellington  was  the  foremost,  to  pay 
him  those  last  honours  which  his  heroic  life  and  conduct  deserved,  in 
the  manner  that  could  best  mark  the  opinions  we  entertained  of  him 
as  a  brother  soldier,  and  the  loss  his  country  had  sustained  by  his 
fall. 

(Signed)        "  CHARLES  STEWART, 

Major-General  and  Adjutant-General." 

Mr.  Mackenzie  in  his  "  History  of  the  Camerons  "  states  that  the 
following  letter  from  his  father  was  found  in  Colonel  Cameron's 
pocket  after  his  death. 


40  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

"  London, 

"  20th  February,  1811. 

"  I  arrived  home  some  few  days  ago  after  rather  a  rough  passage  to 
Falmouth.  Captain  Stanhope  favoured  me  with  his  best  cabin,  for 
which  I  was  thankful.  I  am  glad  to  say  that  I  found  your  sister  quite 
well ;  and,  now  my  own  health  has  so  much  improved,  I  begin  to 
regret  having  resigned  my  command  in  the  army. 

"  Let  me,  however,  charge  you  to  appreciate  your  own  position  at 
the  head  of  a  fine  regiment :  be  careful  of  the  lives  of  the  gallant 
fellows,  at  the  same  time  that  you  will  also  hold  sacred  their  honour, 
for  I  am  sure  they  would  not  hesitate  to  sacrifice  the  one  in  helping 
you  to  maintain  the  other.  I  will  not  trouble  you  with  more  at 
present ;  but  write  when  you  can." 

Massena  being  thus  baffled  in  every  attempt  to  relieve  Almeida,  and 
failing  to  turn  the  position  of  Lord  Wellington,  withdrew  his  army 
across  the  Agueda,  leaving  that  fortress  to  inevitable  capture  or 
surrender. 

The  army  was  now  put  into  cantonments,  and  the  regiment  occu- 
pied the  village  of  Aldea  de  Ponte  from  the  14th  of  May  to  the  6th  of 
June,  when  it  marched  for  the  camp  at  St.  O'Laya,  where  it  remained 
till  the  21st  of  July  ;  from  thence  it  marched  and  again  went  into 
cantonments  at  Bemquerenca  from  the  llth  to  the  22nd  of  August. 
Here  it  was  so  severely  attacked  by  intermittent  fever  and  dysentery 
that  upwards  of  300  men  were  sent  into  general  hospital. 

On  the  2nd  of  September  the  regiment  moved  to  Mealhada  de  Sorda, 
and  on  the  llth  to  Muizella,  whence  it  proceeded  to  Vellades,  where 
it  remained  till  the  3rd  of  October.  It  was  here  joined  by  a  draft  of 
5  sergeants  and  231  rank  and  file  from  the  2nd  battalion,  under 
command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Robert  Fulton,  who  now  assumed 
command  of  the  regiment. 

During  this  month  Lieutenant-Colonel  Nathaniel  Cameron  suc- 
ceeded to  the  command  of  the  2nd  battalion  at  home.  He  was  the 
only  surviving  son  of  Major-General  Alan  Cameron. 

On  the  4th  of  October  the  regiment  removed  to  Trecas,  where  it 
continued  till  the  24th  of  November,  when  the  troops  were  advanced 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  41 

to  quarters  more  contiguous  to  the  Spanish  frontier,  to  assist  in  the 
preparations  for  the  siege  of  Ciudad  Rodrigo. 

On  the  3rd  of  December  the  regiment  went  into  quarters  at  Alma 
Fala,  within  four  leagues  of  Ciudad  Rodrigo ;  but  sickness  still 
prevailing  to  a  great  extent,  on  account  of  its  weak  state,  it  was  re- 
moved on  the  1st  of  January,  1812,  to  Vizen,  a  healthier  locality, 
where  it  was  stationed  till  the  19th  of  February,  1812. 

1812. 

On  the  19th  of  February,  1812,  as  the  men  were  to  a  great  degree 
recovered,  the  regiment  was  ordered  into  the  Alemtejo  to  assist  in 
covering  the  siege  of  Badajoz,  and  on  the  14th  of  March  it  arrived  in 
camp  before  Elvas.  On  the  16th  of  March  the  79th,  with  the  first 
division  of  the  army,  commanded  by  Sir  Thomas  Graham,  crossed 
the  Guadiana  in  order  to  check  Marshal  Soult,  then  advancing  from 
Seville  to  the  relief  of  Badajoz.  On  the  morning  of  the  20th,  after 
a  forced  march  of  twelve  leagues  undertaken  to  surprise  a  division  of 
the  enemy,  Llerena  was  entered  just  as  the  French  were  quitting  it  in 
all  haste.  The  troops  being  jaded  by  so  long  a  march  were  incapable 
of  successfully  following  them  up ;  notwithstanding,  the  42nd  and 
79th,  with  some  cavalry  and  light  guns,  continued  a  spirited  pursuit 
until  the  enemy  had  gained  a  ridge  of  hills  running  in  the  direction 
of  his  main  body. 

Badajoz  having  been  taken  by  storm  on  the  6th  of  April,  the 
regiment  returned  into  the  Alemtejo,  where  it  continued  till  the  20th, 
when  it  joined  the  army  directed  against  Marshal  Marmont,  who  had 
made  an  incursion  into  Portugal  during  the  siege ;  but  upon  the 
approach  of  the  British  to  Castello  Branco  he  retired  precipitately, 
plundering  the  district  through  which  he  passed. 

On  the  2nd  of  May  the  79th  went  into  quarters  at  Alpalhao,  where, 
on  the  llth,  it  was  joined  by  a  draft  of  5  sergeants  and  113  rank  and 
file  from  the  2nd  battalion,  under  the  command  of  Captain  Peter 
Innes.  On  the  19th  it  moved  to  Castello  de  Vide,  thence  to  Sardoal, 
which  it  left  on  the  1st  of  June  to  advance  with  the  army  towards  the 
Portuguese  frontier. 

On  the  13th  the  army  crossed  the  Agueda,  and  on  the  16th  of  July 


42  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

arrived  before  Salamanca.  In  the  memorable  victory  achieved  by  the 
British  army  at  the  battle  of  Salamanca,  on  the  22nd  of  July,  the 
Cameron  Highlanders  can  scarcely  be  said  to  have  participated.  They 
were  stationed  in  reserve  with  Major-General  Campbell's  division  on 
the  extreme  left  of  the  line,  and  were  not  brought  into  action  till  the 
close  of  the  day.  The  loss  of  the  regiment  was  only  2  rank  and  file 
wounded,  nevertheless  the  services  of  the  regiment  were  considered 
of  sufficient  importance  to  obtain  the  royal  authority  for  the  word 
"  Salamanca  "  to  be  inscribed  on  their  colours  and  appointments,  and 
a  gold  medal  was  conferred  on  the  commanding  officer,  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Robert  Fulton. 

On  the  12th  of  August  the  allied  army  entered  Madrid;  the  79th 
following  on  the  14th  with  Major-General  Campbell's  division,  when 
it  was  quartered  in  the  Escurial.  Lord  Wellington  having  now 
determined  to  lay  siege  to  Burgos,  the  army  left  Madrid  on  the  1st  of 
September,  and  on  the  18th  arrived  before  that  city,  when  preparations 
were  at  once  commenced  for  the  investment  of  the  castle,  held  by  a 
strong  French  garrison  commanded  by  General  Dubreton. 

On  the  morning  of  the  19th,  the  light  battalion,  formed  by  the 
several  light  companies  of  the  24th,  42nd,  58th,  60th,  and  79th, 
commanded  by  Major  the  Honourable  E.  C.  Cocks  of  the  79th,  was 
selected  for  the  purpose  of  driving  the  enemy  from  his  defences  on 
the  heights  of  St.  Michael's,  consisting  of  a  horn-work  and  fleches 
commanding  the  approach  to  the  castle  on  the  right  side. 

The  attack  was  made  by  a  simultaneous  movement  on  the  two 
advanced  fleches,  which  were  carried  in  a  most  gallant  manner  by  the 
light  companies  of  the  42nd  and  79th ;  but  a  small  post  close  to  and 
on  the  left  of  the  horn-work  was  still  occupied  by  the  enemy,  from 
which  he  opened  a  fire  upon  the  attacking  party.  Lieutenant  Hugh 
Grant,  with  a  detachment  of  the  light  company,  was  sent  to  dislodge 
him,  but  finding  himself  opposed  by  ever-increasing  numbers,  he 
found  it  impossible  to  advance,  but  equally  resolved  not  to  retire,  he 
drew  up  his  small  party  under  cover  of  an  embankment,  and,  possess- 
ing himself  of  a  wounded  soldier's  musket,  fired  together  with  his  men, 
and  gallantly  maintained  the  position.  The  remainder  of  the 
company  now  came  up  and  the  enemy  was  driven  within  the  works  ; 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  43 

but  this  brave  young  officer  was  unfortunately  mortally  wounded,  and 
died  a  few  days  afterwards,  sincerely  and  deeply  regretted. 

The  two  light  companies  maintained  their  position  until  night-fall, 
when  the  light  battalion  was  assembled  at  this  point  with  orders  to 
storm  the  "  Horn-work  "at  11  p.m.  A  detachment  of  the  42nd  and 
a  Portuguese  regiment  were  directed  to  enter  the  ditch  on  the  left  of 
the  work,  and  to  attempt  the  escalade  of  both  demi  bastions,  the  fire 
from  which  was  to  be  kept  in  check  by  a  direct  attack  in  front  by  the 
remainder  of  the  42nd.  The  light  battalion  was  to  advance  along  the 
slope  of  the  hill,  parallel  to  the  left  flank  of  the  work,  which  it  was  to 
endeavour  to  enter  by  the  gorge.  The  attack  by  the  42nd  was  to  be 
the  signal  for  the  advance  of  the  light  battalion  ;  the  command  of  the 
whole  was  entrusted  to  Major-General  Sir  Denis  Pack. 

At  the  appointed  hour  the  troops  moved  to  the  assault.  The  light 
companies,  on  arriving  at  the  gorge  of  the  work,  were  received  by  a 
heavy  musketry  fire  through  the  loop  holes  in  the  palisading,  which 
caused  severe  loss  ;  they  pressed  on  however,  and  without  waiting  to 
use  their  felling  axes  and  ladders,  lifted  the  foremost  men  over  the 
palisades.  The  first  man  to  enter  the  "  Horn-work  "  was  Sergeant 
John  McKenzie  of  the  79th.  He  was  lifted  over  the  palisades  by 
Sergeant  Masterton  Mclntosh  of  the  regiment,  receiving  a  bayonet 
thrust  through  his  left  arm  as  he  reached  the  ground  inside.  He  was 
closely  followed  by  Major  Cocks  and  Sergeant  Masterton  Mclntosh 
and  others  of  the  storming  party.  In  this  manner,  and  by  means  of 
the  scaling  ladders,  the  light  battalion  was,  in  a  few  minutes,  inside 
the  work,  and  a  guard  of  12  men  under  Sergeant  Donald  McKenzie 
of  the  79th  having  been  placed  at  the  gate  leading  to  the  castle,  a 
charge  was  made  upon  the  garrison,  and  a  fierce  struggle  ensued. 
The  French  overpowered  by  the  light  battalion,  rushed  to  the  gate 
occupied  by  the  small  guard  of  the  79th.  Sergeant  McKenzie  and 
his  party  behaved  with  the  greatest  bravery  in  their  endeavours  to 
prevent  the  escape  of  the  French  garrison.  Sergeant  McKenzie  was 
very  severely  wounded,  and  Bugler  Charles  Bogle  of  the  79th  was 
afterwards  found  dead  at  the  gate  near  to  a  French  soldier,  the  sword 
of  the  former  and  the  bayonet  of  the  latter  through  each  other's 
bodies  ! 


44  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

The  front  attack  had  in  the  meantime  completely  failed,  and  a 
severe  loss  was  sustained. 

The  enemy  now  opened  fire  from  the  castle  on  to  the  "  Horn-work  " 
with  showers  of  grape,  and,  as  this  proved  most  destructive,  the  light 
battalion  was  withdrawn  to  the  ditch  of  the  curtain.  The  storming 
party  was  then  relieved  by  other  troops,  who  were  employed  during 
the  night  in  forming  a  parapet  in  the  gorge. 

Sergeant  Donald  McKenzie,  who  was  so  severely  wounded,  had 
also,  it  should  be  stated,  volunteered  to  command  the  party  carrying 
the  scaling  ladders,  and  had  himself  placed  some  of  them  against  the 
palisades.  He  and  Sergeant  Masterton  Mclntosh  were  brought  to  the 
notice  of  Lord  Wellington,  and  recommended  for  commissions. 
Sergeant  McKenzie  had  previously  applied  to  Major  Cocks  for  the 
use  of  his  dress  sabre,  which  the  major  readily  granted,  and  he  related 
with  satisfaction  that  the  sergeant  had  returned  it  to  him  in  a  state 
which  indicated  that  he  had  used  it  with  effect. 

"  Camp  Burgos, 

"  20th  September,  1812. 

"LIGHT   BATTALION   ORDERS. 

"  Major  Cocks  cannot  pass  over  the  events  of  yesterday  and  last 
night  without  returning  his  most  hearty  thanks  to  the  officers,  non- 
commissioned officers,  and  privates  of  Colonel  Stirling's  brigade.  To 
praise  valour  which  was  so  conspicuous  is  as  unnecessary  as  to 
distinguish  merit  which  was  so  universally  displayed  is  impossible ; 
but  Major  Cocks  must  say,  it  never  was  his  lot  to  see,  much  less  his 
good  fortune  to  command,  troops  who  displayed  more  zeal,  more 
discipline,  or  more  steady  intrepidity." 

After  the  capture  of  the  "  Horn- work,"  the  measures  taken  to 
reduce  the  castle  of  Burgos  consisted  of  a  succession  of  assaults, 
ending,  with  one  exception,  in  repulses,  owing  to  the  absence  of  a 
battering  train. 

In  one  of  these  assaults  Major  Andrew  Lawrie  of  the  79th,  a  most 
gallant  and  able  officer,  was  killed  whilst  entering  the  ditch  and  in  the 
act  of  encouraging  his  storming  party  of  Guards  and  Germans  to  the 


79TH   CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  45 

assault  by  escalade;  and  Major  the  Honourable  E.  C.  Cocks  met 
with  a  like  fate  whilst  in  the  act  of  rallying  his  picquet  during  a  night 
sortie  by  the  French  garrison. 

Lord  Wellington,  by  whom  this  officer  was  much  esteemed  for  his 
bravery  and  early  military  talent,  attended  the  funeral  with  his  staff ; 
and  the  deep  sorrow  which  his  lordship  expressed  was  participated  in 
by  all  who  had  known  the  deceased  officer. 

Major  Cocks  had  been  recommended  for  the  brevet  rank  of 
lieutenant-colonel  for  his  conduct  in  command  of  the  light  battalion 
on  the  19th  of  September,  but  his  death  deprived  him  of  the  gratifi- 
cation of  seeing  his  promotion  in  the  Gazette. 

Besides  Majors  Lawrie  and  Cocks,  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  in 
the  various  operations  during  the  siege,  had  1  sergeant  and  27  rank 
and  file  killed ;  Captain  William  Marshall,  Lieutenants  Hugh  Grant, 
Kewan  Leslie,  and  Angus  McDonald,  5  sergeants,  1  drummer,  and 
79  rank  and  file  wounded.  Lieutenant  Hugh  Grant  died  of  his 
wounds. 

The  enemy,  having  received  strong  reinforcements  from  France, 
advanced  from  different  points  to  raise  the  siege,  which  was  now 
relinquished ;  and  the  British  army,  having  broken  up  camp  at  Burgos, 
commenced  a  hasty  retreat  into  Portugal,  which  it  entered  on  the  19th 
of  November  and  immediately  went  into  winter  quarters. 

On  the  1st  of  December  the  regiment  was  quartered  at  Vodra, 
where  on  the  25th  it  was  joined  by  a  draft  from  the  2nd  battalion  of 
2  sergeants  and  42  rank  and  file,  under  Captain  William  Bruce. 

1813. 

The  regiment  occupied  quarters  at  Vodra  till  the  9th  of  February, 
1813,  when  it  moved  to  Sameice.  On  the  20th  of  February 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Neil  Douglas  joined  from  the  2nd  battalion,  and 
assumed  command  of  the  regiment  in  succession  to  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Fulton  retired,  and  he  personally  commanded  it  until  the 
termination  of  the  war. 

On  the  30th  of  April  the  regiment  was  removed  to  Medoens,  where 
it  was  joined  by  a  draft  of  2  sergeants  and  39  rank  and  file  from  the 
2nd  battalion,  under  the  command  of  Captain  Malcolm  Fraser. 


46  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

About  the  middle  of  May  the  army  broke  up  from  winter  quarters 
to  resume  active  offensive  operations.  At  this  time  the  enemy, 
occupying  various  strongly-fortified  positions  on  the  left  bank  of  the 
Douro,  the  79th  with  the  left  wing  of  the  army  commanded  by  Sir 
Thomas  Graham,  crossed  the  river  at  Torre  del  Moncorvo,  then 
marched  along  the  northern  bank,  while  the  remainder  of  the  army 
advanced  upon  Salamanca,  upon  which  the  enemy  precipitately 
evacuated  his  strong  posts  on  both  banks  of  the  river.  The  army 
continued  to  advance,  and  on  the  4th  of  June  was  concentrated 
between  Valladolid  and  Palencia. 

The  works  of  Burgos,  which  had  been  so  gallantly  defended  the 
preceding  year,  had  been  destroyed  by  the  enemy,  and  the  army  moved 
to  the  left  and  crossed  the  Ebro  unopposed  near  its  source,  when  it 
advanced  directly  to  Vittoria,  where,  in  the  general  action  which 
followed  on  the  21st  of  June,  the  enemy  was  completely  routed,  with 
the  loss  of  all  his  guns,  ammunition  waggons,  baggage,  and  camp 
equipage  of  every  description.  His  flight  was  followed  up  to 
Pampeluna,  where  he  left  a  strong  garrison,  and  then  continued  his 
retreat  to  the  frontiers  of  France. 

In  the  honours  of  the  battle  of  Vittoria  the  79th  had  no  share,  as 
it  formed  part  of  Major-General  Sir  E.  Pakenham's  division,  which 
was  detained  at  Medina  del  Pomar  to  cover  the  train  of  ammunition 
and  stores.  This  division  immediately  after  the  battle  was  directed  to 
march  upon  Salvatierra,  in  order  to  intercept  a  strong  French  corps, 
under  Marshal  Clauzel,  which  was  endeavouring  to  form  a  junction 
with  the  main  body  of  the  French  army  in  its  retreat. 

Marshal  Clauzel  effected  his  escape  and  his  desired  junction  with 
the  main  body  of  the  French  army,  and  the  enemy  having  now  con- 
centrated his  forces,  and  formed  what  he  denominated  FArmee 
d'Espagne,  again  advanced  in  great  force  to  the  relief  of  Pampeluna, 
then  closely  blockaded  by  Lord  Wellington. 

Major-General  Pakenham's  division  was  therefore  recalled,  and, 
having  re-joined  the  army  on  the  28th  of  July,  took  up  a  position 
across  the  valley  of  the  Lanz,  immediately  in  rear  of  the  left  of  the 
4th  division,  with  its  right  resting  on  the  village  of  Oricain  and  its  left 
on  the  heights  on  the  opposite  side  of  the  valley.  It  was  scarcely 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  47 

formed  in  order  of  battle  when  it  was  attacked  by  a  very  superior 
French  force,  which  it  repulsed  with  severe  loss.  The  action  spread- 
ing soon  became  general  along  the  heights  occupied  by  other  divisions, 
nearly  every  regiment  charging  with  the  bayonet ;  and  the  result  of 
the  battle  of  the  Pyrenees,  as  this  action  was  called,  was  a  repulse  of 
the  enemy  at  all  points. 

The  loss  of  the  regiment  was  1  sergeant  and  16  rank  and  file  killed ; 
Lieutenant  J.  Kynoch,  2  sergeants,  1  drummer,  and  37  rank  and  file 
wounded.  Lieutenant-Colonel  Neil  Douglas  had  his  horse  killed 
under  him. 

For  this  battle  the  regiment  received  the  royal  authority  to  bear  the 
word  "  Pyrenees "  on  its  colours  and  appointments.  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Neil  Douglas  had  a  gold  medal  conferred  upon  him,  and 
Major  Andrew  Brown  was  promoted  to  the  brevet  rank  of  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  for  gallantry  displayed  when  in  command  of  the  brigade 
picquets  at  the  commencement  of  the  action. 

The  79th  with  its  division  followed  up  the  enemy  by  Alta  Biscar 
and  Alduides,  until  the  army  finally  encamped  near  the  Pass  of  Mayo. 
Here,  on  the  12th  of  September,  the  regiment  was  joined  in  camp  by 
a  draft  from  the  2nd  battalion  of  2  sergeants  and  40  rank  and  file 
under  the  command  of  Lieutenant  Ewen  Cameron.  Whilst  the 
regiment  remained  here  the  strong  fortresses  of  St.  Sebastien  and 
Pampeluna  fell.  On  the  9th  of  November  the  army  was  put  in 
motion,  and,  passing  the  French  frontier  on  the  10th,  the  regiment 
shared  in  the  battle  of  "  Nivelle,"  when  the  enemy  was  completely 
driven  from  the  strong  line  of  entrenchments  thrown  up  to  resist  the 
passage  of  the  allied  army.  The  fine  line  formed  by  the  Cameron 
Highlanders,  when  ascending  the  hills  to  meet  the  enemy,  excited  the 
admiration  of  Sir  Roland  Hill,  who  was  pleased  to  remark  the  steady 
advance  of  the  regiment  under  fire.  The  conduct  of  the  regiment 
gained  a  clasp  for  Lieutenant-Colonel  Sir  Neil  Douglas,  who 
commanded  it  in  action,  and  it  subsequently  received  the  royal 
authority  to  have  the  word  "  Nivelle  "  inscribed  on  its  colours  and 
appointments.  Its  loss  was  1  rank  and  file  killed,  Ensign  John 
Thomson  and  5  rank  and  file  wounded. 

On  the  16th  the  regiment  encamped  at  Ustaritz,  where  it  was  joined 


48  HISTORICAL   RECORDS  OF   THE 

by  a  draft  of  4  sergeants  and  46  rank  and  file  from  the  2nd  battalion, 
under  the  command  of  Captain  J.  H.  Christie. 

On  the  9th  of  December  it  advanced  from  Ustaritz,  and  on  the 
10th  it  shared  in  the  successful  attack  upon  the  enemy's  fortified  line 
of  entrenchments  on  both  banks  of  the  river  Nive,  when  it  had  5 
rank  and  file  killed ;  Lieutenant  Alexander  Robertson,  2  sergeants, 
and  24  rank  and  file  wounded.  Lieutenant-Colonel  Neil  Douglas 
had  an  additional  clasp  conferred  upon  him  for  this  service,  and  the 
regiment  by  royal  authority  received  permission  to  have  the  word 
"  Nive  "  added  to  the  other  inscriptions  on  its  colours  and  appoint- 
ments. 

The  enemy  being  no  longer  able  to  cover  Bayonne  retired  to  a 
position  on  Gave  d'Oleron,  when  the  inclemency  of  the  weather 
suspended  all  further  operations.  The  regiment  then  went  into 
quarters  at  St.  Pierre  d'Yurbe  till  the  20th  of  February,  1814,  when  it 
marched  to  St.  Jean  de  Luz  to  receive  its  clothing,  of  which  it  stood 

greatly  in  need. 

1814. 

At  this  time  the  enemy,  being  compelled  to  abandon  his  position  on 
the  Gave  d'Oleron,  retreated  upon  Orthes,  from  which  he  was  driven 
on  the  25th  of  February  with  great  loss,  after  an  obstinate  resistance, 
retreating,  closely  followed  by  the  allies,  on  Toulouse.  In  the  honours 
of  the  battle  of  Orthes  the  79th  did  not  participate,  as  it  had  not 
rejoined  the  division  from  St.  Jean  de  Luz  at  the  time. 

At  daybreak  on  the  morning  of  the  10th  of  April  the  6th  division, 
under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir  H.  Clinton,  crossed  the 
Garonne,  and,  following  the  route  of  the  4th  division,  after  a  march  of 
some  hours  arrived  within  two  leagues  of  the  enemy's  encampment, 
when  the  troops  were  halted  to  cook  provisions.  Having  by  this  flank 
movement  turned  the  enemy's  position,  which  was  a  height  between 
and  running  parallel  to  the  canal  of  Languedoc  and  the  river  Ers, 
fortified  by  entrenchments  and  redoubts,  the  army  again  resumed  its 
march  and  crossed  the  Ers  at  Croix  d'Orrade.  Shortly  afterwards  the 
division  halted  near  the  northern  extremity  of  the  height,  and  arrange- 
ments were  made  for  an  attack.  The  6th  division,  still  following  Sir 
Lowry  Cole's — the  4th — advanced  by  the  left  bank  of  the  Ers,  and 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  49 

soon  after  the  attack  on  the  redoubts — de  1'Est  and  de  1'Ouest — was 
made  by  General  Don  Manuel  Freyre's  corps  of  Spaniards,  which  was 
drawn  up  in  close  column,  headed  by  a  complete  rank  of  officers. 
These  troops  advanced  to  the  attack  with  great  steadiness,  but  on  a 
near  approach  to  the  glacis  of  the  works  which  were  occupied  by  the 
enemy,  they  met  with  so  warm  a  reception  that  they  retired  in  the 
greatest  disorder. 

The  6th  division  still  continued  its  movement,  filing  by  threes  at  the 
double  close  under  the  enemy's  guns,  from  which  a  heavy  cannonade 
of  round  and  grape  shot  was  now  opened,  occasioning  considerable 
loss.  The  Highland  brigade,  under  Sir  Denis  Pack,  consisting  of  the 
42nd,  79th,  and  91st  regiments,  to  which  were  added  the  12th  Portu- 
guese, halted  about  mid-way  to  the  position,  formed  line  to  the  right, 
and  proceeded  to  ascend  the  hill.  The  Light  companies  were  now 
ordered  out  to  cover  the  brigade,  General  Pack  bravely  leading  them 
on  in  person.  The  Grenadier  company  of  the  79th  was  brought  up 
as  a  reinforcement  to  the  light  troops  ;  and  after  a  vigorous  resistance 
the  enemy  was  driven  to  a  considerable  distance  down  the  opposite 
slope  of  the  ridge.  The  pursuit  was  then  discontinued,  and  a  slack- 
ened and  desultory  fire  of  advanced  posts  succeeded. 

The  brigade  had,  in  the  meantime,  formed  on  the  Balma  road 
across  the  height,  the  light  companies  were  recalled,  and  final  arrange- 
ments made  for  an  attack  on  the  two  centre  redoubts  of  the  enemy's 
position,  designated  respectively  "  La  Colombette  "  and  "  Le  tour  des 
Augustins." 

The  attack  of  the  former,  or  most  advanced  redoubt,  was  assigned 
to  the  42nd,  and  the  latter  to  the  79th,  the  91st  and  12th  Portuguese 
being  in  reserve.  Both  these  redoubts  were  carried  at  the  charge  in  a 
most  gallant  style  in  the  face  of  a  terrific  fire  of  round  shot,  grape, 
and  musketry,  by  which  very  severe  loss  was  sustained.  About  100 
men  of  the  79th,  headed  by  several  officers,  now  left  the  captured 
work  to  encounter  the  enemy  on  the  ridge  of  the  plateau  ;  but, 
suddenly  hearing  a  discharge  of  musketry  in  the  redoubt  captured  by 
the  42nd  in  their  rear,  and  also  seeing  it  again  in  the  possession  of 
the  enemy,  they  immediately  fell  back  on  the  redoubt  des  Augustins. 
The  Colombette  had  been  suddenly  attacked  and  entered  by  a  fresh 


50  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

and  numerous  column  of  the  enemy,  and  the  42nd  was  compelled  to 
give  way  and  retire,  closely  followed  by  the  enemy,  along  a  deep 
narrow  road  leading  through  the  redoubt  des  Augustins  occupied  by 
the  79th.  The  79th  joined  in  the  retreat,  and  both  regiments  for  a 
moment  quitted  the  works. 

Lieutenant  Ford  and  seven  men  of  the  79th  were  cut  off  in 
their  retreat,  and  must  have  been  taken  prisoners  but  for  the 
presence  of  mind  of  one  of  the  privates  who  called  out  "sit  down," 
which  hint  was  immediately  acted  on,  and  they  were  mistaken  for 
wounded — a  French  officer  expressing  his  regret  that  he  could  not 
assist  them. 

At  this  critical  juncture,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Douglas  having  re- 
formed the  79th,  the  regiment  again  charged  the  enemy,  and  succeeded 
not  only  in  re-taking  the  Augustins  redoubt  but  also  the  Colombette. 
For  this  service  Lieutenant-Colonel  Douglas  received,  on  the  field, 
the  thanks  of  Generals  Clinton  and  Pack  commanding  the  division 
and  brigade  ;  and  the  regiments  in  reserve  having  now  come  up, 
the  brigade  was  moved  to  the  right,  for  the  purpose  of  carrying, 
in  conjunction  with  the  Spaniards,  the  two  remaining  redoubts  on 
the  left  of  the  position.  While,  however,  the  necessary  preparations 
were  being  made  for  this  attack,  the  enemy  was  observed  to  be  in 
the  act  of  abandoning  them,  thus  leaving  the  British  army  un- 
disputed masters  of  the  field.  The  79th  spent  the  night  in  the 
Colombette  work. 

The  conduct  of  the  regiment  was  so  highly  distinguished  on  this 
occasion  as  to  call  forth  the  particular  commendation  of  the  Marquis 
of  Wellington  in  his  despatch,  in  which  it  will  be  observed  that  only 
four  regiments  are  specially  mentioned,  all  of  them  belonging  to  the 
sixth  division ;  and  when  it  is  considered  that  the  rear  face  of  the 
Colombette,  captured  by  the  42nd,  commanded  the  city  of  Toulouse 
within  half  cannon-shot,  and  that  the  front  face  of  the  Tour  des 
Augustins,  captured  by  the  79th,  commanded  the  valley  of  the  Ers, 
the  importance  of  the  services  performed  by  these  two  regiments  will 
be  at  once  admitted.  The  following  extract  from  the  despatch  above 
alluded  to  will  confirm  these  observations. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  51 

Extract  from  the  Marquis  of  Wellington's  despatch  to  Earl  Bathurst, 
dated — 

"Toulouse,  12th  April,  1814. 

"  Marshal  Beresford  continued  his  movement  along  the  ridge,  and 
carried,  with  General  Pack's  brigade  of  the  sixth  division,  the  two 
principal  redoubts  and  fortified  houses  in  the  enemy's  centre.  The 
enemy  made  a  desperate  effort  from  the  canal  to  regain  these  redoubts, 
but  they  were  repulsed  with  considerable  loss  ;  and  the  sixth  division 
continuing  its  movement  along  the  ridge  of  the  height  and  the 
Spanish  troops  continuing  a  corresponding  movement  upon  the  front, 
the  enemy  was  driven  from  the  two  redoubts  and  entrenchments  on 
the  left,  and  the  whole  range  of  heights  was  in  our  possession.  We 
did  not  gain  this  advantage,  however,  without  severe  loss,  particularly 
in  the  brave  sixth  division.  The  30th,  42nd,  79th,  and  61st  regiments 
lost  considerable  numbers,  and  were  highly  distinguished  throughout 
the  day. 

"The  loss  of  the  79th  was  Captains  Patrick  Purvis  and  John 
Cameron,  Lieutenant  Duncan  Cameron,  and  16  rank  and  file  killed  ; 
Lieutenant  Colonel  Neil  Douglas  had  a  horse  shot  under  him ; 
Captains  Thomas  Milne,  Peter  Innes,  James  Campbell,  and  William 
Marshall ;  Lieutenants  William  McBarnet,  Donald  Cameron,  James 
Fraser,  Ewen  Cameron  (i),  Ewen  Cameron  (2),  John  Kynoch,  Duncan 
McPherson,  Charles  McArthur,  Allan  McDonald;  Ensign  Allan 
McLean,  and  Lieutenant  and  Adjutant  Kenneth  Cameron,  12  ser- 
geants, 2  drummers,  and  182  rank  and  file  wounded;  1  rank  and  file 
missing.  Lieutenants  William  McBarnet,  Ewen  Cameron  (2),  and  23 
rank  and  file  died  of  their  wounds  within  a  few  days  of  the  battle. 

"  '  We  found  the  heroes  on  the  plain, 
Their  eyes  were  fixed,  their  hands  were  ohill ; 

Still  bore  their  breasts  the  life-blood  stain, 
The  blood  was  on  their  bonnets  still, 

They  died  as  hearts  like  theirs  should  die, 
In  the  hot  grasp  of  victory.' 

"The  regiment  went  into  action  36  officers,  31  sergeants,  13  drum- 
mers, and  414  rank  and  file,  and  came  out  18  officers,  19  sergeants, 
11  drummers,  and  215  rank  and  file." 


52  HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 

Mr.  Mackenzie,  in  his  "  History  of  the  Camerons"  publishes  the 
following  interesting  letter  from  Lieutenant-Colonel  Duncan  Cameron 
of  the  79th  to  Major-General  Alan  Cameron,  written  a  day  or  two 

after  the  battle  :— 

"  Toulouse,  France, 

"  13th  April,  1814. 
"  MY  DEAR  GENERAL, 

"I  take  the  very  first  opportunity  I  could  command  since 
our  coming  to  this  place  on  the  10th,  to  write  you.  We  fought  a 
heavy  battle  that  day  (Sunday)  with  Soult,  which  we  fervently  trust  will 
finish  this  interminable  contest.  I  am  sorely  grieved  at  the  loss  of  so 
many  dear  relatives  and  comrades  in  this  action — in  which  I  know 
you  will  join.  Your  two  nephews  John  and  Ewen,  my  cousin  Duncan, 
and  Captain  Purvis  were  killed,  and  Lieutenant  McBarnet  is  not  likely 
to  outlive  his  wounds.  Adjutant  Kenneth  Cameron  is  also  severely 
wounded ;  indeed  I  think  Colonel  Douglas  and  myself  are  the  only  two 
among  the  officers  that  escaped.  We  buried  Captain  Purvis,  John, 
Ewen,  and  Duncan  in  one  grave,  in  the  citadel  of  Toulouse,  and  I  have 
ordered  a  memorial  slab  to  mark  their  resting  place.  News  is  about 
that  Napoleon  has  abdicated,  but  not  confirmed.  I  will,  however, 
write  again  and  acquaint  you  of  anything.  I  hope  your  own  health 
has  improved.  My  best  regards. 

"  I  am,  yours  ever  sincerely, 

"  DUNCAN  CAMERON, 

11  Brevet  Lieut-Colonel." 
"  To  Major-General  Cameron, 

Gloucester  Place,  London." 

In  a  French  work,  entitled  "Precis  Histotique  de  la  bataille  de 
Toulouse"  the  loss  of  the  Highland  regiments  of  the  6th  division  is 
thus  noticed ;  and,  although  much  exaggerated,  is  worthy  of  observa- 
tion, as  showing  the  degree  of  importance  attached  by  the  enemy 
to  the  services  performed  by  these  troops  : — 

"  Les  Ecossais  sur  tout  y  firent  des  pertes  enormes.  Des  debris  de 
trois  regiments  n'on  forma  plus  qu'un  seul.  700  furent  enterres  daus 
un  de  ces  retranchements." 

yeutenant-Colonel  Neil  Douglas  received  the  decoration  of  a  gold 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  53 

cross  for  this  action,  in  substitution  of  all  his  former  decorations ; 
Major  Duncan  Cameron,  the  brevet  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel  in  the 
army  ;  and  the  regiment  by  royal  authority  was  permitted  to  bear  on 
its  colours  and  appointments  the  word  "  Toulouse,"  in  addition  to  its 
other  inscriptions.  As  a  proof,  likewise,  of  the  distinction  earned  by 
it  during  the  successive  campaigns  in  the  Peninsula,  and  for  its  gen- 
eral services  throughout  the  war,  it  was  subsequently  authorised  to 
have  the  word  "  Peninsula  "  inscribed  on  its  colours  and  appointments. 
The  news  of  the  abdication  of  Napoleon  Buonaparte  and  the 
restoration  of  the  Bourbons  having  been  received  the  day  after  the 
battle,  hostilities  were  suspended,  and  the  regiment  was  quartered  in 
several  villages  in  the  South  of  France.  While  in  cantonments,  it 
received  a  draft  of  2  sergeants  and  64  rank  and  file  from  the  2nd 
battalion,  under  the  command  of  Captain  Robert  Mackay. 

On  the  3rd  of  July  it  embarked  at  Pauiliac,  a  small  port  on  the 
Gironde,  to  return  to  England ;  and  on  the  26th  of  the  same  month 
it  landed  and  marched  into  barracks  at  Cork.* 

On  the  25th  of  December  following  it  was  joined  by  a  draft  of 
4  sergeants  and  257  rank  and  file  from  the  2nd  battalion,  under  the 
command  of  Captain  John  Sinclair ;  and  on  the  27th  of  January, 
1815,  it  embarked  at  the  Cove  of  Cork,  together  with  several  other 
regiments,  destined  to  reinforce  the  army  then  acting  in  North 
America  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Edward 
Pakenham. 

1815. 

On  the  8th  of  February  the  expedition  sailed,  but  was  driven  back 
the  same  day  by  contrary  winds.  On  the  1st  of  March  it  again  sailed, 
but  adverse  winds  once  more  compelled  it  to  put  back. 

On  the  3rd  of  March  the  expedition  to  America  was  counter- 
ordered,  and  on  the  17th  the  regiment  sailed  for  the  North  of  Ireland. 

It  disembarked  on  the  27th  at  Warren's  point,  near  Newry,  and 
from  thence  marched  to  Belfast. 

The  escape  of  Napoleon  Buonaparte  from  Elba,  and  his  triumphal 
entry  into  Paris,  again  necessitated  Great  Britain  taking  up  arms  against 

*  During  the  Peninsular  war  the  79th  lost  650  officers,  non-commissioned  officers, 
and  men,  in  action,  from  wounds,  disease,  &c. 


54  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

France,  and  in  the  month  of  May  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were 
ordered  to  Flanders.  The  regiment  marched  from  Belfast  to  Dublin, 
embarked  on  board  some  small  craft,  and  sailed  for  the  Downs, 
where  transports  were  in  readiness  to  receive  it.  From  the  Downs  it 
sailed  to  Ostend,  where  it  landed,  and  was  conveyed  along  the  line 
of  canal  from  Bruges  to  Ghent.  From  Ghent  the  regiment  marched 
to  Brussels  and  there  joined  the  army  of  the  Duke  of  Wellington. 

The  79th  was  brigaded  with  the  28th  and  32nd  regiments,  under 
the  command  of  Major-General  Sir  James  Kempt,  forming  the  first 
brigade  of  the  5th,  or  Sir  Thomas  Picton's,  division. 

At  10  o'clock  on  the  night  of  the  15th  of  June  the  troops  in 
Brussels  received  orders  to  hold  themselves  in  readiness  to  march  at 
a  moment's  notice.  About  12  o'clock  the  bugles  were  sounding 
throughout  the  city  for  the  troops  to  assemble,  rations  were  issued  for 
three  days,  and  the  division  began  its  march  about  4  o'clock  on  the 
following  morning  along  the  road  leading  to  Charleroi.  The  muster- 
ing of  the  troops  on  this  eventful  night  has  been  celebrated  in  one  of 
the  ablest  epics  our  age  has  produced,  Byron's  "  Childe  Harold;" 
and  an  individual  prominence  has  been  given  to  the  79th  in  the 
touching  and  magnificent  stanzas  descriptive  of  the  marshalling  of  the 
hardy  warriors  destined  to  do  battle  on  the  morrow  : — 

"  And  wild  and  high  the  '  Cainerons  gathering  '  rose 

The  war  note  of  Lochiel,  which  Albyu's  hills 
Have  heard,  and  heard  too  have  her  saxon  foes  ; 

How  in  the  noon  of  night  that  pibroch  thrills 
Savage  and  shrill  !  but  with  the  breath  which  fills 

Their  mountain-pipe,  so  fill  the  mountaineers 
With  the  fierce  native  daring  which  instils 

The  stirring  memory  of  a  thousand  years, 
And  Evan's,  Donald's  fame  rings  in  each  clansman's  ears." 

At  8  o'clock  a.m.  the  division  halted  in  the  Forest  of  Soignes, 
near  the  village  of  Waterloo,  three  leagues  from  Brussels,  and  soon 
after  the  Duke  of  Wellington,  accompanied  by  his  staff,  was  observed 
passing  to  the  front.  The  troops  began  to  cook  their  provisions,  but 
before  this  was  done  orders  were  given  for  the  division  to  resume  its 
march  at  once.  Cannonading  was  now  heard  distinctly  in  front,  and 
the  troops  pressed  forward  under  a  burning  sun  and  amidst  clouds .  of 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  55 

dust  through  Gemappes  to  Quatre  Bras,  where  the  column  halted  on 
the  road  and  piled  arms  for  a  quarter  of  an  hour.  From  a  rising 
knoll  at  the  head  of  the  column  a  full  view  could  be  obtained  of  the 
enemy,  who  appeared  to  be  advancing  obliquely  to  the  left,  about  half- 
a-mile  off.  A  brisk  cannonade  was  going  on  in  the  direction  of  the 
Prussian  army  on  the  left.  In  front  a  battalion  of  Belgians  was 
retiring  before  the  enemy  and  exchanging  shots  with  him.  In  support 
of  this  battalion  two  companies  of  the  Rifle  brigade,  attached  to  the 
division,  were  sent  out. 

The  two  brigades  then  moved  to  the  left,  lining  the  Namur  road, 
the  banks  of  which  were  here  ten  or  fifteen  feet  high  on  either  side. 
The  Cameron  Highlanders  formed  the  extreme  left  of  the  British 
army,  and  the  92nd  Highlanders  the  right  of  the  division,  being 
posted  immediately  in  front  of  Quatre  Bras.  Scarcely  had  the 
division  got  into  position  when  the  enemy  advanced  to  the  attack. 
The  light  companies  of  the  first  brigade,  with  the  8th  company  and 
marksmen  of  the  79th,  were  ordered  out  to  skirmish  and  keep  down 
the  fire  of  the  enemy's  sharp-shooters,  which  was  causing  a  heavy  loss 
particularly  amongst  the  officers.  It  was  now  a  quarter  to  three 
o'clock.  The  light  companies  in  front  maintained  their  ground  for 
an  hour  against  the  ever-increasing  number  of  the  enemy  ;  but  as  his 
sharp-shooters  had  by  this  time  picked  off  nearly  all  the  artillerymen 
who  were  serving  the  only  two  British  guns  which  had  as  yet  come 
into  action,  and  as  he  was  becoming  very  threatening  in  front,  the 
Duke  of  Wellington,  who  was  present  with  his  staff,  directed  Sir 
Thomas  Picton  to  detach  a  regiment  to  the  front,  in  order  to  cover 
the  guns,  and  drive  the  enemy  from  his  advanced  position.  Sir 
James  Kempt  thereupon  rode  up  to  Colonel  Douglas  and  said  that 
the  honour  of  executing  his  grace's  orders  would  devolve  on  the 
Cameron  Highlanders. 

The  regiment  accordingly  cleared  the  bank  in  front,  fired  a  volley 
as  it  advanced,  and,  charging  with  the  bayonet,  drove  'the  French 
advanced  troops  with  great  precipitation  and  in  disorder  to  a  hedge 
about  one  hundred  yards  in  rear,  where  they  attempted  to  re-form,  but 
were  followed  with  such  alacrity  that  they  again  gave  way,  pursued  to 
another  hedge  about  the  same  distance,  from  which  they  were  again 


56  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

driven  in  great  confusion  upon  their  main  column,  which  was  formed 
on  the  rising  ground  opposite.  The  regiment,  now  joined  by  number 
8  company,  halted  and  formed  up  behind  the  last  hedge  and  fired 
volleys  at  the  enemy  until  all  the  ammunition  was  expended.  Whilst 
in  this  critical  position  it  was  ordered  to  retire,  which  it  accomplished 
without  confusion,  although  it  had  to  re-pass  the  first  hedge  and  cross 
a  deep  ditch,  and  formed  line  about  fifty  yards  in  front  of  its  original 
position.  Here  it  was  ordered  to  lie  down  as  it  was  much  exposed  to 
the  enemy's  fire,  and  it  remained  lying  down  for  about  an  hour,  when 
it  was  again  ordered  to  its  original  position  in  the  Narnur  road. 
Being  afterwards  repeatedly  threatened  by  cavalry  it  had  to  move 
forward  a  little  and  form  square. 

In  the  meantime  the  other  regiments  of  the  division  were  warmly 
engaged.  The  Royals,  42nd,  28th,  44th,  and  92nd,  were  repeatedly 
charged  by  the  enemy's  cuirassiers,  who  were  everywhere  repulsed  ; 
but,  amongst  the  killed  were  Colonels  Sir  Robert  Macara  and  Cameron 
of  Fassiefern,  the  commanding  officers  of  the  42nd  and  92nd.  Every 
regiment,  from  the  sudden  and  peculiar  nature  of  these  attacks,  was 
compelled  to  act  quite  independently  for  its  own  immediate  defence. 

The  enemy's  columns  at  length  began  to  suffer  much  from  the  well- 
directed  fire  of  the  British  artillery,  which  was  now  coming  into 
action  ;  and,  as  he  had  failed  in  every  attack,  at  dusk  he  desisted 
from  further  fighting,  and  by  9  p.m.  all  firing  had  ceased. 

The  troops  of  the  division  proceeded  to  form  their  bivouac  for  the 
night  on  an  open  space  in  advance  of  the  Namur  road  and  the 
position  they  had  occupied  during  the  battle. 

The  loss  of  the  79th  was  Captain  John  Sinclair,  Lieutenant  and 
Adjutant  John  Kynoch,  and  28  rank  and  file  killed ;  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Neil  Douglas,  Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonels  Andrew  Brown 
and  Duncan  Cameron ;  Captains  Thomas  Milne,  Neil  Campbell, 
William  Marshall,  Malcolm  Fraser,  William  Bruce  and  Robert 
Mackay ;  Lieutenants  Thomas  Brown,  William  Maddock,  William 
Leaper,  James  Fraser,  Donald  McPhee,  and  William  A.  Riach ; 
Ensign  James  Robertson,  Volunteer  Alexander  Cameron,  10  ser- 
geants, and  248  rank  and  file  wounded.  All  the  field  officers,  in 
addition  to  severe  wounds,  had  their  horses  killed  under  them. 


79lH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  57 

At  daylight  on  the  17th  the  troops  were  in  full  expectation  of  a 
renewal  of  the  attack,  but  a  few  shots  only  were  exchanged  by  the 
picquets.  At  1  o'clock  p.m.  a  retreat  was  ordered  by  the  Brussels 
road,  and,  in  order  to  mask  this  movement,  the  light  companies  of 
the  division  were  thrown  out  some  distance  in  front.  The  army 
continued  to  retire,  covered  by  the  artillery  and  cavalry,  till  it  had 
passed  Genappe,  when  it  began  to  rain  heavily.  The  division  then 
halted  for  about  half-an-hour,  and  at  dusk  filed  off  the  road  to  the  right, 
at  the  farm  of  La  Haye  Sainte,  and  took  up  its  position  in  corn 
fields  under  cover  of  some  rising  ground.  From  the  summit  of  this 
ground  a  few  shots  were  fired  by  the  divisional  artillery  at  the  enemy's 
columns,  as  they  occupied  the  heights  opposite  to  the  British  position. 
The  division  bivouacked  in  the  corn  fields,  the  remainder  of  the  army 
occupying  the  continuation  of  the  ridge  to  the  right  and  left  of  the 
division.  The  divisional  artillery  (in  advance  of  which  were  strong 
picquets)  remained  posted  in  front  for  the  night.  The  left  of  the 
division  extended  towards  Ohaim,  its  right  resting  on  the  Brussels 
road. 

It  rained  heavily  all  night,  and  rain  was  still  falling  when  daylight 
broke  on  the  morning  of  Waterloo. 

About  8  o'clock  a.m.  on  the  18th  it  began  to  clear  up,  and 
about  10.30  the  enemy  was  observed  to  be  falling  in  and  preparing 
for  the  attack.  The  division  awaited  the  approach  of  the  enemy 
lying  down  in  close  column  at  deploying  interval.  The  French 
advanced  in  columns  under  cover  of  a  tremendous  cannonade,  which 
was  answered  with  great  spirit  by  the  British  artillery,  who  were 
posted  in  advance  of  a  road  which  ran  along  the  crest  of  the  rising 
ground  in  front  of  the  division,  and  on  either  side  of  which  there  was 
a  hedge.  Kempt's  brigade  then  deployed  into  line,  threw  out  its  light 
troops,  and  advanced  up  to  where  the  artillery  were  posted.  The  light 
companies  and  Rifles  descended  into  the  valley,  and  maintained  a 
severe  contest  with  very  unequal  numbers,  until  a  heavy  column  of 
the  enemy's  infantry,  driving  them  in,  advanced  direct  against  that 
portion  of  the  line  occupied  by  the  left  wing  of  the  79th  and  right 
wing  of  the  28th.  Picton  allowed  this  column  to  approach  quite  close, 
and  then,  after  one  volley,  he  charged  at  the  head  of  the  two  regi- 


58  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

ments  and  drove  back  the  French  down  the  hill  at  the  point  of  the 
bayonet.  It  was  in  this  charge  that  the  gallant  Picton  fell,  shot 
through  the  temple,  his  last  words  (to  his  aide-de-camp)  were — 
"  Thornton,  rally  the  Highlanders  ! "  At  this  moment  Sir  William 
Ponsonby's  brigade  of  cavalry  (the  1st,  2nd,  and  6th  Dragoons), 
the  Union  brigade,  came  up,  and  passing  through  the  intervals  in 
the  division,  charged  the  broken  and  flying  column  of  the  enemy, 
capturing  one  eagle  and  many  prisoners. 

The  Greys  passed  through  the  92nd  with  loud  shouts  of  "  Scotland 
for  ever !"  the  enthusiasm  being  so  great  that  many  of  the  92nd  men 
joined  in  the  charge  with  them. 

Bodies  of  the  enemy's  cavalry  now  advanced  to  the  support  of  his 
infantry,  and  the  several  regiments  of  Kempt's  brigade  formed  square. 
During  this  formation  piper  Kenneth  Mackay  of  the  79th,  a  brave 
Highlander,  stepped  outside  the  bayonets  and  continued  to  play  round 
the  outside  of  the  square  the  popular  air,  "  Cogadh  na  Sith"  Soon 
afterwards  the  brigade  was  ordered  to  retire  to  its  former  position  on 
the  road,  when  it  again  lined  the  hedge  nearest  the  enemy.  Here  it 
was  exposed  for  some  time  to  a  galling  and  destructive  fire,  both 
from  his  artillery,  directed  on  the  British  guns,  and  from  a  numerous 
body  of  sharp-shooters  placed  behind  a  bank  running  oblique  to  the 
right  of  the  brigade  near  the  Brussels  road. 

The  enemy  having  failed  in  his  former  attempt,  about  6  p.m.  sent 
forward  by  the  Brussels  road  large  bodies  of  cuirassiers  and  other 
cavalry,  followed  by  large  masses  of  infantry.  This  formidable  effort 
was  principally  directed  against  the  British  centre.  Orders  were  now 
received  by  the  brigade,  in  the  event  of  being  attacked  by  cavalry, 
to  retire  on  the  2nd  line;  and  the  several  regiments  being  now  without 
a  round  of  ammunition,  exhausted  by  excessive  fatigue  and  reduced 
to  skeletons,  although  not  actually  attacked  by  cavalry,  did  fall  back 
to  the  second  hedge  on  the  opposite  side  of  the  road.  General  Pack's 
brigade,  however,  advanced  to  their  support,  and  a  supply  of  ammu- 
nition being  obtained,  the  regiments  of  Kempt's  brigade  again 
advanced  and  lined  the  front  hedge.  The  enemy's  right  was  now 
hotly  pressed  by  the  advancing  Prussians,  and  as  that  just  made  by 
his  cavalry  and  infantry  on  the  British  centre  had  also  been  brilliantly 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  59 

repulsed,  Napoleon  launched  his  magnificent  old  guard  against  the 
British  position  at  La  Haye  Sainte  in  hopes  of  still  saving  the  battle. 
The  overthrow  of  the  old  guard  was  the  signal  for  a  general  retreat  of 
the  whole  French  army,  and  at  about  8.20  p.m.  the  British  line  moved 
forward  amidst  loud  and  universal  cheering. 

The  shattered  remnant  of  the  79th  still  occupied  the  position  it  had 
held  throughout  the  day ;  but,  notwithstanding  the  exhausted  state 
of  the  regiment,  no  sooner  were  the  orders  for  a  general  advance 
heard  than  the  same  unconquered  spirit  of  enthusiasm  appeared  to 
animate  both  officers  and  men.  Lieutenant  Alexander  Cameron,  who 
had  commanded  the  regiment  for  the  last  two  or  three  hours,  waving 
his  sword,  called  on  the  men  to  advance ;  and  with  loud  cheers  the 
debris  of  the  regiment  pressed  forward,  determined  to  maintain  to  the 
end  the  position  it  had  held  throughout  the  day. 

The  pursuit  was  continued  by  the  Prussian  cavalry ;  but  the  British 
halted  on  the  ground  which  the  enemy  had  occupied  during  the 
action.  The  Cameron  Highlanders  bivouacked  for  the  night  at  the 
farm  of  La  Belle  Alliance. 

The  loss  of  the  79th  was  Captain  John  Cameron,  Lieutenants 
Duncan  McPherson,  Donald  Cameron,  and  Ewen  Kennedy,  2  ser- 
geants, and  27  rank  and  file  killed.  Captains  James  Campbell  and 
Neil  Campbell;  Lieutenants  Alexander  Cameron,  Ewen  Cameron, 
Alexander  Forbes,  Charles  McArthur,  and  John  Fowling ;  Ensigns 
A.  J.  Crawford  and  J.  Nash;  7  sergeants,  4  drummers,  and  121  rank 
and  file  wounded,  —being  a  total  numerical  loss  on  both  days  of  479, 
exceeding  by  one  that  of  any  other  regiment  in  the  army,  the  3rd 
battalion  of  the  1st  Foot  Guards  alone  excepted,  which  was  almost 
annihilated.  Captain  Neil  Campbell,  Lieutenants  Donald  Cameron 
and  John  Fowling,  and  43  men,  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras  or  Waterloo, 
died  of  their  wounds  soon  afterwards. 

Officers.         Sergeants.      Drummers.    Rank  &  file. 

Numbers  engaged  41  40  11  684 

Killed  at  Quatre  Bras  2  0  0  28 

Wounded  at  Quartre  Bras  17  10  0  248 

Killed  at  Waterloo  420 

Wounded  at  Waterloo  9  7  4  121 

Remaining  unwounded  at  the  |     Q  91  7  ofiO 

close  of  the  battle  )     ' 


60  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

"  La  Haye,  bear  witness,  sacred  is  its  height, 
And  sacred  is  it  truly  from  that  day  ; 
For  never  braver  blood  was  spent  in  fight 
Than  Briton  here  has  mingled  with  the  clay. 
Set  where  thou  wilt  thy  foot,  thou  scarce  can'st  tread 
Here  on  a  spot  unhallowed  by  the  dead. 
Here  was  it  that  the  Highlanders  withstood 
The  tide  of  hostile  power,  received  its  weight 
With  resolute  strength,  and  stemmed  and  turned  the  flood  ; 
And  fitly  here,  as  in  that  Grecian  strait, 
The  funeral  stone  might  say — Go  traveller,  tell 
Scotland,  that  in  our  duty  here  we  fell." 

Southey's  "Pilgrimage  to  Waterloo.'' 

The  high  character  which  the  regiment  acquired  at  Fuentes  d'Onor, 
Toulouse,  and  Quatre  Bras  was  nobly  maintained  throughout  this 
eventful  day;  and  its  conduct  was  mentioned  in  highly  flattering 
terms  in  the  Duke  of  Wellington's  despatch  to  Earl  Bathurst,  dated 
"Waterloo,  19th  June,  1815;"  and  it  is  worthy  of  observation,  that 
in  this  despatch,  as  in  that  of  the  battle  of  Toulouse,  the  division  of 
the  British  army  to  which  the  Scottish  regiments  were  attached,  is  the 
only  one  especially  mentioned.  The  following  is  an  extract  from  the 
despatch  above  alluded  to  : — 

"The  troops  of  the  fifth  division,  and  those  of  the  Brunswick 
corps,  were  long  and  severely  engaged,  and  conducted  themselves 
with  the  utmost  gallantry.  I  must  particularly  mention  the  28th, 
42nd,  79th,  and  92nd  regiments,  and  the  battalion  of  Hanoverians." 

In  the  Prussian  official  despatch  by  Marshal  Prince  Blucher,  dated 
18th  June,  1815,  the  distinguished  conduct  of  the  Scotch  regiments 
is  thus  adverted  to : — 

"The  English  army  fought  with  a  valour  which  it  is  impossible  to 
surpass  ;  and  the  repeated  charges  of  the  old  guard  were  baffled  by 
the  intrepidity  of  the  Scotch  regiments." 

From  the  great  loss  it  sustained  amongst  the  superior  officers,  the 
command  of  the  regiment  eventually  devolved  upon  Lieutenant 
Alexander  Cameron,  who  was  promoted  to  a  company  in  the  gazette 
subsequent  to  the  battle,  and  afterwards  to  the  brevet  rank  of  major, 
for  his  very  conspicuous  gallantry  on  that  occasion. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


61 


The  distinction  of  a  companionship  of  the  Order  of  the  Bath  was 
conferred  upon  the  commanding  officer,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Neil 
Douglas,  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel  Andrew  Brown,  and  Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Duncan  Cameron ;  Captain  Thomas  Milne,  the 
senior  captain,  was  promoted  by  brevet  to  be  a  major  in  the  army ; 
each  surviving  officer  and  soldier  engaged  either  at  Quatre  Bras  or 
Waterloo  received  the  decoration  of  the  silver  "Waterloo"  medal, 
and  was  allowed  to  reckon  two  additional  years'  service,  whilst  it  is 
almost  superfluous  to  add  that  the  regiment  received  the  royal 
authority  to  bear  the  word  "  Waterloo "  on  its  colours  and  appoint- 
ments, in  commemoration  of  its  services  on  this  glorious  day. 

The  following  is  a  complete  list  of  the  officers,  non-commissioned 
officers,  and  men  who  served  in  the  ranks  of  the  Cameron  High- 
landers at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo  : — 

STAFF. 


Lieutenant-Colonel 

Neil  Douglas 

Severely  wounded. 

Major  and  Brevet  Lieutenant-  Colonel  Andrew  Brown... 

Ditto 

»                  >j                        »> 

Duncan  Cameron    ... 

Ditto 

Lieutenant  and  Adjutant 

John  Kynoch    ... 

Killed. 

Quarter-Master 

Angus  Cameron 

Surgeon 

John  Ridesdale... 

Assistant-  Su  rgeon 

W.  G.  Burrell 

M 

David  Perston  ... 

Paymaster 

John  McArthur 

Acting  -Adjutant-Lieutenant 

George  Harrison 

Sergeant-Major 

Masterton  Mclntosh 

Quarter-Master-Sergeant 

James  Hay 

Paymaster-Sergeant 

William  Lane 

Armourer-Sergeant 

John  Morris 

Schoolmaster-  Sergean  t 

William  Gray 

GRI 

Captain           Neil  Campbell     ... 
Lieutenant      Alexander  Cameron 
,,               William  Leaper 
„              Duncan  McPherson 

SerV^t   f     James  McQueen 

:NADIERS. 

Died  of  wounds. 
Wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 

Killed. 

62  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

GRENADIERS— (continued). 

Sergeant  Thomas  Campbell     ...         ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  Gordon  Cowie 

„          Alexander  Gunn        ... 

„  Colin  McDonald  ...         ...         ...          ...     Slightly  wounded. 

Corporal  William  Astbury       Killed. 

,.          John  Mowat         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

,,          Rose  Campbell  

„          George  MeNie 

„          John  Walton  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Private     Donald  Andrew 

„          George  Beekie  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

William  Black 

„          Ebenezer  Brown        ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  David  Buckley     ...  ..          ..          Severely  wounded. 

„  Henry  Burns 

„          Donald  Cameron  (1st)      ..         ..          ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Donald  Cameron  (2nd)          Killed. 

„          Duncan  Cameron  ...         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

„          Donald  Campbell  (1st)          ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Donald  Campbell  (2nd)  Killed. 

Neil  Campbell  

„  Mark  Clarke         ...         ...         ...          ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

,,  William  Cormick       ...         ...          ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

,,  Daniel  Dillon 

,,  Peter  D unbar  ...         ...         ..  ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

„          Samuel  Fervel      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„          John  Fraser 

„  John  Gall  ...         ..  ...          ..  ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Daniel  Gibbons          ...         ...         ...         ..,  Killed. 

.,          Alexander  Gow    ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Gray 

„          John  Hayter 
,,          David  Henderson 

Walter  Henderson  Killed. 

John  How      Killed. 

„  Peter  Hutton       

„          William  Harvey         ...  .         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Kerr  ...  ..         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Robert  Jeffrey  Killed. 

„  Thomas  Kirkwood  ...         ...         ...          ...     Severely  wounded. 

,,  John  Kennedy  ...          .,         ..          .,.  Severely  wounded, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


63 


GRENADIERS — (continued). 

Private  Peter  McArthur          

„  Charles  Luss 

, ,  Alexander  McLennan 

., '      Hugh  McCaskill          

„  Alexander  McDonald 

„  John  McDonald 

„  Donald  Mclntosh 

„  Charles  Mclntosh         

„  Peter  Mclnroy 

„  Robert  Mclnnes 

„  Donald  McGillivray  

„  Kenneth  McKay 

„  Robert  McKay  (1st)          

„  Robert  McKay  (2nd)  

„  James  McGill         

„  John  McKechnie 

„  John  McLean 

„  John  McMillan 

„  John  McPherson 

„  Peter  McLaren 

„  Allan  McLachlan 

„  Neil  McPherson 

„  John  McPhee         

„  William  Manson 

„  Donald  Munro 

„  Alexander  Moss 

.,  John  Moorhead 

„  John  Mowat     ... 

„  Thomas  Murray     ... 

„  Andrew  Noble 

„  Thomas  Noble        

„  Robert  Phillips  

„  James  Raggs 

„  John  Reid 

„  Alexander  Ritchie 

„  David  Ross 

„  Alexander  Stewart 

,,  Donald  Sutherland 

,,  Hugh  Sutherland 

James  Sutherland 

Daniel  South  wale 


Slightly  wounded. 

Killed. 

Died  of  wounda 

Severely  wounded. 

Killed. 

Dangerously  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Died  of  wounds. 


Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 


Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 

Killed. 


64 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

GRENADIERS — (continued. ) 


Private        William  Swanson 
„  Archibald  Taylor 

William  Williamson 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


No.  I. 

Captain  William  Bruce Severely  wounded. 

Lieutenant  A.  Forbes Slightly  wounded. 

„  Donald  McPhee  ...          ...          ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

Ensign  A.S.Crawford        Slightly  wounded. 

Sergeant  Hugh  Bannerman 

„  Ewen  Mackenzie     ... 

„  George  Sinclair 

„  William  Swanson    ... 

„  David  Taylor 

Corporal  John  McLellan  (1st)  Severely  wounded. 

„  John  McLellan  (2nd)   ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  John  0 'Neil  ..          ..          Severely  wounded. 

Private  William  Adams  ... Slightly  wounded. 

„  William  Allan          ...  .,         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  James  Anderson 

„  Thomas  Armstrong  ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  George  Bain       ...         ...         ...         ..  ...     Killed. 

„  Charles  Boag 

„  George  Brian 

„  John  Bruce Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Cameron      ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Cameron 

.,  Angus  Campbell 

„  George  Coghill        

„  William  Coleman          Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Coventry 

„  James  Diver      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Angus  Dickson 

„  James  Givan      ...         ...         ...         ...         ..      Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Grant Severely  wounded. 

„  Archibald  Hamilton      

„  Archibald  Henderson         

.,  James  Hume      ..          Slightly  wounded. 

„  Stephen  Hunt         Slightly  wounded. 

William  Johnston         Severely  wounded. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


65 


No.  I. — (continued). 

Private  James  Jack.., 

„  George  Jeffray  ... 

,,  David  Kinnaird 

„  Hugh  McBinnie  

,,  John  McCetrick 

„  William  McReady         

„  Colin  Mclntosh 

„  George  McKay  (1st)     

George  McKay  (2nd) 

Neil  McKay 

„  George  Mackenzie   ... 

,,  James  McLellan 

„  Angus  McLeod        

,,  Hugh  McLeod   .. 

,,  James  McLeod 

,,  Roderick  McLeod 

„  John  McLongish     ... 

.,  James  Marshall 

„  William  Martin 

„  Samuel  Mitchell  

,,  Henry  Munro 

,.  Thomas  Moon    ... 

„  Thomas  Mully         ..  

.,  James  Nesbit    ... 

„  Thomas  Owens 

„  John  O'Neil       

„  James  Rae  ... 

„  James  Robertson 

.,  James  Scott 

,,  Andrew  Sheddon 

,;  John  Wemyss 

Thomas  Whiteside 


No.  II. 


Lieutenant  John  Fowling 

„            James  Cameron 
Ensign          McPhee        

Colour-  )   -r,  , 
Sergeant  }  Peter  Grant       ... 

Lachlan  MacLachlan 
John  McCrumman 
James  McGowan 


Killed. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 


Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Died  of  wounds. 


66 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


No.  II. — (continued). 

Sergeant  Hugh  Cameron  .  .         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

Corporal  Colin  Henderson     ...         ...  ..         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Hugh  Love        ...         ...          ...  ..         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 

„  John  McLeod          Slightly  wounded. 

„  Angus  Bruce  ...         ...         ..  ...     Slightly  wounded. 

Drummer  James  McKay 

Private  James  Atkins 

„  Gilbert  Ayre 

„  Thomas  Brakenridge     ... 

„  Angus  Bince  ...         ...         ..          ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  George  Burgess 

„  Robert  Calder         

„  Alexander  Campbell     ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Campbell  (1st)          Slightly  wounded. 

.,  John  Campbell  (2nd)  Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Clowes  

„  William  Cummings      ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Daniel  Ewart          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Fairweather 

„  David  Fish  ...         

„  Alexander  Fraser         Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Hastie  Killed. 

„  David  Harden  Severely  wounded. 

,,  John  Hayes 

„  Charles  Heathy  

,,  Jonathan  Hazel 

„  James  Killoch 

„  David  Laird  Severely  wounded. 

William  Lithgow ...     Severely  wounded. 

William  Lane         Killed. 

„  Magnus  Larnoch  ...         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

Donald  McBain      ..          Severely  wounded. 

„  John  McCulloch  Severely  wounded. 

„  Donald  McKay        

„  Peter  McKinnon  Killed. 

.,  Donald  Mackenzie 

James  Mackenzie          Severely  wounded. 

„  John  McLeod          Severely  wounded. 

Norman  McLeod         Severely  wounded. 

„  Angus  McMillan     ,         

John  McMillan  Killed. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


67 


No.  II.— (continued). 


Private  Alexander  Morton 

„  David  McWhinnie 

,;  Henry  Neil 

„  Edward  Roberts 

„  James  Robertson  (1st) 

„  James  Robertson  (2nd) 

„  Thomas  Robertson 

„  Joseph  Southall 

„  John  Stark 

„  Charles  Stewart 

„  Donald  Sutherland 

,,  Thomas  Train 

,,  Robert  Varmen 

,,  John  Westwood 

„  Alexander  Weir 

„  Robert  Young 

William  McKay      ... 

Robert  Ashton 


No.  III. 


Captain 
Lieutenant 

j» 

Ensign 
Sergeant 


Corporal 


Drummer 


Private 


Thomas  Mylne 
W.  Maddock 
Ewen  Cameron 
C.  J.  McLean 
John  Cummings 
John  Gray 
Alexander  Lamont 
William  Gurney 
Andrew  Horn 
James  Mowatt 


Slightly  wounded. 


Severely  wounded. 


Slightly  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Killed. 


Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 
Severely  weundcd. 
Severely  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Died  of  wounds. 

Severely  wounded. 


William  Newbigging  ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 


Peter  Ross 
James  Marshall 
John  Broughall 
Peter  Campbell 
William  Allan 
Alexander  Anderson 
William  Anderton 
William  Baird 
James  Barr 
John  Blunt 
Thomas  Bryson 


Slightly  wounded. 
Killed. 


Slightly  wounded. 


Dangerously  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 


68 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


Private 


No.  III. — (continued). 

Matthew  Boyd  

David  Binst 
Duncan  Cameron 

William  Campbell  

Michael  Connell 
George  Drysdale 
John  Easton 
James  Fisher 
John  Guyler 
McBain  Hamilton 
Thomas  Henderson 

William  Horton     

John  Johnston 

Edward  Kelly        

Norman  Leslie 
John  Lumsden 

Donald  McColl  

Murdoch  McCraw  ... 

Charles  McDonald         

Dugald  McDonald  

John  McDonald 
Malcolm  McDonald 
Norman  McDonald 
Murdoch  McFarlane 

Hugh  McGillivray  

John  McGregor  (1st) 
John  McGregor  (2nd) 

Peter  Mclntosh       

Donald  McKain 
John  McKay 
George  McKenzie 

William  McKenzie  

John  McKinnon 
Alexander  McMillan 
John  McNaughten 
Archibald  Martin  ... 

William  May 

John  Miller 
James  Mills 

William  Miller        

Thomas  Mitchell 


Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 


Slightly  wouoded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

Dangerously  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 


Dangerously  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


69 


No.  III.  —  (continued.) 


Private 


Hugh  O'Donnelly 
John  Patterson 
James  Penman 
Robert  Petrie 
James  Rogers 
James  Shaw 
John  Shaw 
Norman  Shaw 
John  Smith 
John  Taylor 
Andrew  Thompson 
Neil  Turner      . . . 
James  Walsh 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 

Dangerously  wounded. 
Dangerously  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Taken  prisoner. 


Captain 

» 

Lieutenant 
Ensign 


Colour-   \ 
Sergeant  J 

Sergeant 


Corporal 


Private 


No.  IV. 

John  Sinclair Died  of  wounds. 

Robert  Mackay       ...         .  ..  ...  Severely  wounded. 

Ewen  Kennedy  Killed. 

James  Robertson    ...          ...         ..  ...  Severely  wounded. 

Alexander  Cameron      ..         ...          ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Willam  McKay       

John  Malcolm 

John  Murray          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Samuel  Owens 

John  Donald 

Gavin  Hamilton 

Alexander  McKay  ...         . .  ...  Severely  wounded. 

George  McPherson 

William  Abercrombie        ...         ... 

Michael  Alexander       

Peter  Angus 

Donald  Banks  ...          Died  of  wounds. 

James  Barton        ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Samuel  Bergam 

John  Birnie  ...         ...         . .  ...  Severely  wounded. 

Joseph  Bogle 

Donald  Cameron    ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

James  Campbell          

William  Campbell  (1st) 

William  Campbell  (2nd ) 


70  HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 

No.  IV. — (continued). 

Private  William  Cooper     ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  woitoded. 

„  Thomas  Crawford        Killed. 

„  John  Fitton  

,,  Andrew  Flockart         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Roderick  Fraser     ... 

,,  John  Graham  ..          ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Adam  Gray 

,,  David  Glasgow 

„  Donald  Grant 

„  John  Hamilton 

„  William  Harley      ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Heatley          ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Heath          ...         ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  George  Henderson 

,,  William  Henderson 

„  John  Innes       ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  James  Jamieson     ...  ..         ..  ..  Slightly  wounded. 

„  Peter  Johnson 

„  John  Kennedy 

„  John  King 

„  Michael  Loftus 

„  Samuel  McCunne 

„  John  McDonald     ... 

„  Thomas  McDonald 

„  James  Mclntosh    ...         ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

, ,  William  Mclntosh       

„  Donald  McKay       

William  McKellar        Killed. 

„  James  McKenzie Slightly  wounded. 

„  Kenneth  McKenzie     ...         ..          ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Angus  McLean      Severely  wounded. 

„  James  McPherson 

,,  Archibald  Mills      ...         ...         ,.,         ...  Severely  wounded 

,,  James  Paton  Slightly  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Paterson          ...         ,..         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Pirrie 

„  Peter  Pringle          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Ross  (1st) 

„  John  Ross  (2nd) Slightly  wounded. 

„  Robert  Russell  Severely  wounded, 

Thomas  Shaw 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


71 


No.  IV.— (continued). 

Private  David  Sinclair  Slightly  wounded. 

„  James  Sutherland  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

,,  William  Sutherland    ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Archibald  Taylor 

„  George  Wardrop 

„  Matthew  Young 


No.   V. 


Captain       Peter  Innes 
Lieutenant  James  Fraser 
W.  A,  Riach 


Sergeant 


Corporal 


Severely  wounded. 
...     Severely  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

NeilMcIntosh  

George  Manuel       ..,         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

James  White 

John  Barnett          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Archibald  Clelland  

Donald  Fraser         Severely  wounded. 

Hugh  Love        ...  ...         ...         ...         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 


Drummer  Robert  Baldwin 

„  John  Manners 

Private  Alexander  Alexander 

„  John  Adam 

„  George  Adams 

„  John  Bain 

„  Alexander  Bannerman 

„  William  Binnie 

„  George  Black 

,,  John  Blair 

„  James  Brown 

„  Thomas  Brown 

Matthew  Brand       ... 
William  Calder 

„  Donald  Cameron 

,,  George  Cameron 

,,  Alexander  Campbell 

.,  William  Clarke 

„  George  Coghill 

„  James  Dyke 
James  Fairlie 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


Severely  wounded. 


Slightly  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 

Killed 

Slightly  wounded. 


72  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

No.  V.— (continued). 

Private  Andrew  Falconer 

„  William  Farms 

„  William  Finnic  

„  Angus  Ferguson      ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

,,  Robert  Fletcher  

„  John  Forbes  ...         ...         ...  ..  Killed. 

„  John  Gibson      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

.,  James  Galloway      ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Peter  Grant       

„  Donald  Guun  ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Henry 

„  William  Kelly         

Alexander  Johnson       |  Severely^wounded. 

„  Alexander  Johnstone 

.,  John  Laurie       ...         ...         ...         ..  .      Severely  wounded. 

„  Andrew  Lee 

„  William  Lyall  

,,  Alexander  McDonald 

„  James  McDonald 

„  Kenneth  McDonald  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

,,  Duncan  McGibbon 

„  Timothy  McGunigall 

„  Michael  Me  Kale  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

, ,  Alexander  McKay 

„  Holt  McKenzie  ...         ...         ...         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 

„  John  Mel  jeod 

,',  John  McLaren  ...          ...          ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Malcolm    ... 

„  John  Manuel     ...         ...         ..  ...         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 

,,  John  Miller  ...         ...         ...         ..  Died  of  wounds. 

„  Douglas  Mills    ...         ...         ...         ...         ,..     Slightly  wounded. 

„  James  Paterson       ...          ...         ...         ..  Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Reid 

„  William  Reid  

„  George  Shaw     ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

.,  Nathaniel  Scott      

„  William  Stewart  Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Watson 

„  Adam  Wars 

„  JohnWildie  ...         ...         ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Robert  Winton  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


73 


No.  VI. 

Captain        James  Campbell  .         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

Lieutenant  John  Thompson     ... 

„  Donald  Cameron  ...         ...         ...         ...     Died  of  wounds. 

Ensign          Archibald  Cameron  

Colour-    |JamesBlack 
Sergeant  J 

Sergeant      William  Lambell    ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

.,  Sinclair  Henderson       ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

,,  William  Lever         ...         ...          ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

Corporal      John  Gardiner    .. 
„  John  Kennedy 

„  Duncan  McGregor          Slightly  wounded 

„  Angus  Morton 

„  James  Rowan     ...         ..          Severely  wounded. 

Drummer    Thomas  McDonald  ... 
Private         Thomas  Archibald 

John  Atkins  ...         ...         ...         ..  Severely  wounded. 

,,  Thomas  Bramner 

„  Alexander  Campbell 

„  David  Campbell  Severely  wounded. 

„  Peter  Carrick          Killed. 

„  Neil  Campbell 

Matthew  Cowan Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Fife  

„  Frederick  Finlay Slightly  wounded. 

, ,  William  Finlay  son 

„  John  Forster  ...         ...         ...         .  . 

, ,  Donald  Gollan Severely  wounded. 

Thomas  Gibbing 

„  Donald  Grant Severely  wounded. 

„  George  Gray 

John  Gray Severely  wounded. 

George  Gwilliam Slightly  wounded. 

William  Gunn Severely  wounded. 

,,  John  Harley 

John  Hogg        Slightly  wounded. 

,,  John  Houston 

,,  William  Humphries 

William  Kerr  

„  Duncan  McCuig 

Charles  McDonald  ..  Severely  wounded. 


74  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

No.  VI. — (continued). 

Private  Daniel  McGinnerty       Severely  wounded. 

„  Denis  McGinnerty ,«         ... 

„  Alexander  Mclntosh     ...         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

„  Alexander  McKay  ... 

„  Angus  McKay  (1st)      Severely  wounded. 

„  Angus  McKay  (2nd) 

„  George  McKay  ... 

„  Donald  McKenzie    ... 

„  Donald  McLeod 

„  John  McPherson     ... 

David  McQuattie          Killed. 

„  Andrew  Morgan 

William  Morland          

„  James  Mowat          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Charles  Munro  ... 

„  Angus  Murray         Severely  wounded. 

,,  James  Robertson          ...         ...         ...          ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Robert  Shaw  ...          ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Archibald  Smith  Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Smith 

„  William  Smith  ...         ...         ...         ...         ..      Severely  wounded. 

„  Noble  Sproul 

„  Lachlan  Stewart  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

,,  John  Stewart          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Stratton  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

,,  James  Stone  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Donald  Taylor  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  Henry  Travers        Severely  wounded. 

„  Dixon  Vallance  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Walton      ..  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  David  Watt       Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  White 

„  William  Wilson  ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Reid ..  Severely  wounded. 

No.  VII. 

Captain  John  Cameron  Died  of  wounds. 

Lieutenant  Charles  McArthur  Slightly  wounded. 

John  Mackenzie 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  75 

No.  VII.—  (continued). 

Sergeant  Donald  Mackenzie        ...         ...         ...         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Charles  Rose  Dangerously  wounded. 

,,  John  Sutherland 

Corporal  James  Barclay        ...         Severely  wounded. 

„  Duncan  Grant 

„  David  Kerr 

„  John  McDonald  Dangerously  wounded. 

Drummer  William  Christmas  

,.  James  McColl  Severely  wounded. 

Private  Robert  Anderson     ... 

„  Travers  Baillie 

„  Andrew  Barrie 

„  William  Bee      Dangerously  wounded. 

,,  Joseph  Brothers 

„  William  Brummage 

„  William  Carradice 

Thomas  Chrystal          

„  James  Culross         ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Charles  Craig  

„  John  Dempster       Dangerously  wounded. 

„  John  Donnelly  ..         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Colin  Fletcher         ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Hugh  Fraser      

„  John  Fletcher 

„  Jesse  Fulton Severely  wounded. 

,.  Charles  Gore  ...         ...         ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

.,  Adam  Gordon  ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  Andrew  Greig         Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Edward  Hieson 

Robert  Hill  

,,  John  Hutchison  ...         ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

„  James  Jamieson      Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Robert  Keldy    ...         ...         ...         ..          ..      Dangerously  wounded. 

,,  Andrew  Kennedy 

„  William  Kennedy         Killed. 

„  Angus  Kerr  ...         

„  Thomas  Kirkbride       Slightly  wounded. 

.,  John  Macbain          Slightly  wounded. 

„  Gilbert  Me  Arthur         Killed. 

„  Donald  McColl       Dangerously  wounded. 

Duncan  McFarlane       ...    .     ... 


76 


HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 


No.  VII. — (continued). 

Private  David  McGregor     

„  Robert  McGregor         Died  of  wounds. 

„  David  Mclntosh      

„  Peter  Mclntyre  ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Mclvor  Slightly  wounded. 

„  George  McKay 

Hugh  McKay  

„  Ewen  McKenxie 

„  Donald  McKercher  Severely  wounded. 

„  James  McLaren 

„  Hugh  McLennan     ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Donald  McLeod 

„  Donald  McPhersou  ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded. 

,,  Robert  Munro 

„  Peter  Munool          

William  Mitchell          

„  Alexander  Mulligan 

„  Charles  Paterson  

„  James  Pollock         

„  Alexander  Reid  . Slightly  wounded. 

„  William  Reid          Dangerously  wounded. 

Allan  Scott        

„  William  Sutherland  

„  William  Swanson          

John  Watson          ...         ...         ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

„  Henry  Wheeler  Severely  wounded. 

„  Robert  White          

No.  VIII. 

Captain       Malcolm  Fraser  Severely  wounded. 

Lieutenant  Kewan  Leslie 

Ensign         John  Nash         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

Colour-    \  Wim       Baxter  Severely  wounded. 

Sergeant  J 

Sergeant  Peter  McLaughlin  Severely  wounded. 

,,  Donald  Sutherland  ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  John  Wright      ...  ...  .         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

Corporal  Thomas  Birch         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

,,  James  Campbell  ...         ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Clarke 

„  Jeffrey  Goddard  ..  Severely  wounded. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


77 


No.  VIII.— (continued). 

Corporal      George  McKenzie 
„  Alexander  Stewart 

„  Henry  Fogerberry 

Private        David  Allan 
„  William  Athos 

William  Calder  

„  Donald  Campbell 

„  Thomas  Clifton  

„  James  Cooper 

„  Archibald  Gumming     ... 

,,  Henry  Dargan 

„  David  Duncan 

„  Robert  Elliot  

,,  Donald  Faulkner 

„  Robert  Ferguson    ... 

,,  Thomas  Finner 

„  Roderick  Grant 

,,  James  Hill 

„  Samuel  Hinney 

,,  James  Inglis 

„  Allan  Irons 

„  Thomas  Jackson 

„  James  Kerr 

„  John  Lamont 

„  William  Lightbody 

,,  Abraham  Keshaw 

„  John  McDonald  (1st)         

.,  John  McDonald  (2nd) 

„  James  McDonald 

„  Robert  McGillivray 

„  Robert  Mcludoe 

,,  William  Mclntosh        

James  McKay 

Robert  McKay  ..  

William  McKay      .' 

John  McKenzie  (1st) 

John  McKenzie  (2nd) 

William  McKechnie 

Isaac  McKenzie 

Lachlan  McLachlan 

Ewen  McLachlan 


Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 


Severely  wounded. 


Killed. 

Slightly  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

Severely  wounded. 

Killed. 

Slightly  wounded, 

Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Killed. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Killed. 


Severely  wounded. 
Killed, 


78 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


No.  VIII.—  (continued). 

Private        John  McLeod 

Neil  McMillan         

Donald  McPhee  

„  John  Mulchrist 

„  John  Neil 

,.  Robert  Neil  

William  Paul 

„  David  Ross 

„  William  Robertson       

„  Robert  Sinclair 

„  Thomas  Stewart 

„  John  Walker  

„  John  Wands 

„  Daniel  Weir  

„  Donald  Williamson 

„  William  White       

„  Colin  Cameron 

LIGHT   COMPANY. 


Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 

Slightly  wounded. 
Killed. 

Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Severely  wounded. 
Slightly  wounded. 


Captain  William  Marshall          ...         ..          ...         ..,     Severely  wounded. 

Lieutenant  Thomas  Brown       ...         ...         ..          ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Fulton  Robertson         ..          

WilliamDe™       

Sergeant  Donald  McPhee  

„  Donald  McLeod      ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Finlay  Robertson          ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Charles  Campbell 

„  Angus  McKay Severely  wounded. 

Corporal  James  Aitchison      ...  . .          ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Burns       ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Angus  Kennedy 

„  Matthew  Lithgow        ...         ...         ...         ...     Dangerously  wounded. 

„  John  McKenzie 

„  George  Sutherland 

Drummer  Thomas  Bently  ... 

Private  James  Atcherson 

,.  David  Bannerman         ..  ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  James  Bramer         Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Blithe       Killed. 

,,  John  Brockie  ,,.         ...         ...         .,.  Severely  wounded, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


LIGHT  COMPANY—  (continued). 


79 


Private  John  Bruce        ...          ..          ...         ...         ...     Killed. 

„  Lachlan  Campbell  ... 

,,  Archibald  Campbell     ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Chambers 

,,  Kobert  Clelland  ...         ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

„  William  Clunes       

„  Henry  Cormich  ...         ...         ...          . .     Severely  wounded. 

„  Alexander  Cruikshauk 

„  George  Co wie Severely  wounded. 

„  Benjamin  Davidson  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Matthew  Dickie  

„  James  Duffy  ...         .  ...          ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Doyle        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Dunn  ... 

,.  Thomas  Gardner  ...         ...         ...         .  .     Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Gibson  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

,,  Donald  Gunn    ... 

„  John  Gunn  ...         ...         ...          ..         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Matthew  Hayes 

George  Hill  

,,  Murdoch  Jack  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Henry  Jolly 

„  John  Lachlan Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Lennox      Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Lloyd 

„  Donald  McDonald  (1st)     Slightly  wounded. 

.,  Donald  McDonald  (2nd)          ...         ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

,,  James  McDonald    ..          ...         ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded. 

.,  Andrew  McEwen 

.,  Duncan  McFarlane  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Alan  McGillivray          

„  Swain  Mclntosh 

„  Murdoch  Mclntyre 

.,  Donald  McKay 

„  Charles  McKay  Severely  wounded. 

„  William  McKay  (1st)         Severely  wounded. 

William  McKay  (2nd) 

,,  Donald  McKenzie  ... 

„  Lachlan  McKinnon       

„  Donald  McLeod      Severely  wounded. 

,:  Duncan  McLeod  Severely  wounded. 


80 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


LIGHT  COMPANY — (continued). 

Private  John  McLeod  (1st) 

„  John  McLeod  (2nd)      ?..         ..  ...  ..     Severely  wounded. 

„  William  McMillan  ...          ...         ...  Severely  wounded, 

„  Charles  McPherson        ..          ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  James  McPheaters  ...         ..  ...  Slightly  wounded. 

,,  Alexander  McTavish     .. 

;)  James  McMiller 

,,  George  Moor 

„  Peter  Mungan 

„  Allan  Nesmyth 

„  Jamea  Pocock          ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  William  Poole  

„  Donald  Ross 

„  John  Ross          ...         ...         ...         ... 

David  Scott  

.,  William  Sherrat  

William  Shaw         Killed. 

Matthew  Shepherd       Killed. 

„  James  Smith  ...         ...         Severely  wounded. 

„  Donald  Sutherland       Severely  wounded. 

„  John  Sutherland  Slightly  wounded. 

„  William  Thorburn        ...         ...         ...         ...     Severely  wounded. 

„  Peter  Wardrop          Severely  wounded. 

„  David  White Slightly  wounded. 

.,  James  Young          ...         ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded. 

„  Connor  McColl  ...         ...         .  . 

.,  Andrew  Fyne          ...         ...         ...         ...  Killed. 

.,  William  Rose    ...         ...          ..          ..         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

,,  John  Smallbrook     ...         ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded. 

,,  George  Sutherland       ...  .  ...         ...     Slightly  wounded. 

On  the  19th  the  regiment  advanced  with  the  army  in  pursuit  of  the 
enemy,  and  on  the  8th  of  July  it  arrived  at  Clichy,  near  to  which  it 
encamped  within  a  league  of  Paris,  the  capitulation  of  which,  together 
with  the  surrender  of  Napoleon  to  Captain  Maitland,  R.N.,  closed  a 
war  which,  for  its  duration,  its  sanguinary  character,  and  the  combi- 
nation of  events  it  involved,  is  unparalleled  in  history. 

On  the  24th  of  July,  1815,  the  army  was  reviewed  by  the  Emperors 
of  Austria  and  Russia,  the  King  of  Prussia,  the  distinguished  allied 
Commanders,  and  a  great  concourse  of  English  and  Foreign  nobility. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  81 

On  the  5th  of  August  a  draft  of  four  sergeants  and  88  rank  and  file 
joined  from  the  2nd  battalion,  under  the  command  of  Captain  James 
Campbell.  In  compliance  with  a  special  request  from  the  Emperor  of 
Russia,  who  was  personally  desirous  of  examining  the  dress  and 
equipments  of  the  Highland  regiments,  on  the  17th  of  August 
Sergeant  Thomas  Campbell  of  the  Grenadiers,  a  man  of  gigantic 
stature,  with  Private  John  Fraser  and  Piper  Kenneth  Mackay,  all  of 
the  79th,  accompanied  by  a  like  number  of  each  rank  from  the  42nd 
and  92nd  Highlanders,  proceeded  to  the  Palace  Elysee  in  Paris,  then 
the  residence  of  the  Emperor  Alexander.  The  following  is  Sergeant 
Campbell's  account  of  what  took  place  at  this  presentation  :— 

"In  the  month  of  August,  18 L5,  I  was  ordered  to  proceed,  with 
Private  John  Fraser  and  Piper  Kenneth  Mackay,  to  the  Palace  Elyse'e 
in  Paris,  then  the  residence  of  the  Emperor  of  Russia,  where  we  were 
joined  by  Sergeant  McGregor,  Private  Munro,  and  Piper  McKenzie, 
of  the  42nd  Highlanders,  and  Sergeant  Grant,  Private  Logan,  and 
Piper  Cameron,  of  the  92nd  Highlanders.  About  half-an-hour  after 
our  arrival  at  the  Palace,  Lord  Cathcart  sent  a  valet  to  conduct  us  to  the 
grand  hall,  where  we  met  his  lordship,  whom  I  immediately  recognised. 
He  was  pleased  to  order  me  to  take  charge  of  the  party  while  he 
went  to  the  Emperor  to  acquaint  him  of  our  arrival,  and  in  about  ten 
minutes  after  the  Emperor  entered  the  hall  accompanied  by  his  two 
brothers,  as  well  as  Prince  Blucher,  Count  Plutoff,  and  several  other 
distinguished  personages.  The  Emperor  made  a  very  minute  inspec- 
tion of  us,  and  his  curiosity  led  him  to  call  upon  me,  as  being  the 
most  robust  of  the  party,  to  step  to  the  front,  when  he  ordered  the 
rest  to  sit  down.  As  soon  as  I  stepped  to  the  front  I  was  surrounded 
by  the  astonished  nobility,  and  the  Emperor  commenced  his  inspection 
and  questions  as  follows  :  First,  he  examined  my  appointments  and 
drew  my  sword ;  inquired  if  I  could  perform  any  exercise  with  that 
weapon,  which  I  told  him  I  could  not,  and  at  the  same  time  Lord 
Cathcart  made  a  remark  that  it  was  a  deficiency  in  the  British  army 
which  he  had  never  taken  into  consideration  before. 

"  Second,  he  examined  my  hose,  gaiters,  legs,  and  pinched  my  skin, 
thinking  I  wore  something  under  my  kilt,  and  had  the  curiosity  to  lift 

G 


S2  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF  THE 

my  kilt  up  to  my  navel,  so  that  he  might  not  be  deceived.  The  questions 
were :  If  I  was  present  at  the  actions  of  the  16th,  17th,  and  18th  of 
June?  How  many  officers  and  men  the  regiment  lost  on  the  16th, 
17th,  and  18th  of  June?  Whether  I  was  in  Egypt?  If  I  wore  the 
kilt  in  winter,  or  if  I  did  not  feel  cold  in  that  season  ?  If  I  was 
married  ?  If  my  parents  were  alive  ? 

"The  Emperor  then  requested  Lord  Cathcart  to  order  me  to  put 
John  Fraser  through  the  "manual  and  platoon"  exercise,  at  which 
performance  he  was  highly  pleased.  He  then  requested  the  pipers  to 
play  up,  and  Lord  Cathcart  desired  them  to  play  the  Highland  tune, 
"  Cogadh  na  Sith"  which  he  explained  to  the  Emperor,  who  seemed 
highly  delighted  with  the  music. 

"  After  the  Emperor  had  done  with  me,  the  veteran  Count  Plutoff 
came  up  to  me,  and,  taking  me  by  the  hand,  told  me  in  broken 
English  that  I  was  a  good  and  brave  soldier,  as  all  my  countrymen 
were.  He  then  pressed  my  hand  to  his  breast,  and  gave  me  his  to 
press  to  mine.  After  all  was  over,  I  was  ordered  to  take  the  party  to 
Lord  Cathcart's  quarters,  where  we  had  refreshment,  and  received  a 
piece  of  money  each  from  his  lordship,  and  also  his  approbation  for 
our  appearance. 

(Signed)    "THOMAS  CAMPBELL, 

"Sergeant,  79th  Highlanders." 

Finally,  the  79th  having  been  one  of  those  regiments  selected  to 
remain  in  France  for  three  years  with  the  army  of  occupation,  it  was 
formed  into  a  brigade  with  the  4th  and  52nd  regiments,  under  the 
command  of  Sir  Denis  Pack,  and  added  to  the  2nd  division  of  the  army, 
commanded  by  Lieutenant-General  Sir  H.  Clinton. 

On  the  10th  of  December,  1815,  it  proceeded  to  occupy  canton- 
ments in  the  Pas  de  Calais,  where  it  remained  for  the  three  following 
years  in  perfect  harmony  with  the  inhabitants. 

On  the  25th  of  December,  1815,  the  second  battalion  was  reduced 
at  Dundee  barracks. 

During  the  residence  of  the  regiment  in  France  as  a  part  of  the 
British  contingent  it  was  successively  reviewed  with  the  other  corps 


70  I  M    CXMF.RON    HICMI, \\I-ERS.  83 

of  the  army  of  occupation  by  the  Emperor  of  Russia,  the  King  of 
Prussia,  their  Royal  Highnesses  the  Dukes  of  Kent  and  Cambridge, 
and  the  Duke  of  Wellington. 

1818. 

At  length  so  profound  a  tranquillity  pervaded  France,  that  the 
allied  Sovereigns  agreed  to  withdraw  their  respective  contingents. 
On  the  29th  of  October,  1818,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  arrived  at 
( \ilais,  where  they  embarked  for  England,  and  the  following  day 
landed  at  Dover,  and  marched  to  Chichester,  arriving  there  on  the 
8th  of  November. 

1819. 

The  regiment  remained  at  Chichester  till  the  month  of  March,  1819, 
when  it  was  removed  to  Portsmouth.  In  the  month  of  June  in  the 
same  year  it  proceeded  to  the  island  of  Jersey,  where  it  was  quartered 
until  the  month  of  March,  1820. 

1820. 

In  March,  1820,  the  regiment  embarked  for  Plymouth,  and 
d<  <  upied  Cumberland  and  Granby  barracks. 

Soon  after  the  arrival  of  the  regiment  in  Plymouth  the  following 
letter  and  enclosure  was  received  by  the  officer  commanding  from 
Colonel  de  Butts,  R.E.,  commanding  the  troops  in  Jersey  : — 

"  Government  House,  Jersey, 

"15th  April,  1820. 
"SIR, 

"  In  transmitting  the  enclosed  address  of  the  States  of  Jersey, 
I  have  great  pleasure  in  congratulating  you  and  the  battalion  under 
your  command  upon  so  flattering  a  testimony  to  their  conduct  in  this 

island. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  etc., 

(Signed)      "  AUG  DE  BUTTS, 

"  Colonel  Commanding." 

"  The  officer  commanding 

"  79th  Highlanders,  Plymouth," 


84  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

"  At  the  States  of  the  Island  of  Jersey, 

"  The  5th  day  of  April,  1820. 

"  The  States  being  informed  that  the  79th  regiment  of  foot 
quartered  in  this  island,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Brown,  is  called  to  another  part  of  His  Majesty's  dominions,  view  its 
departure  with  those  feelings  of  regret  which  the  happy  experience  of 
its  exemplary  conduct  must  necessarily  produce. 

"  The  discipline  and  order  which  have  uninterruptedly  distinguished 
this  excellent  corps  have  excited  the  admiration  and  deserved  the 
approbation  of  the  States  and  the  inhabitants,  who  have  observed 
with  peculiar  satisfaction  that  not  one  single  violation  of  the  laws,  not 
even  the  slightest  irregularity,  has  occurred  during  its  abode  in  this 
island. 

"  To  the  bravery  and  gallantry  so  repeatedly  displayed  in  the  field 
by  the  regiment  in  the  late  war,  it  has  now  added,  in  a  most  eminent 
degree,  the  no  less  useful  qualities  which  characterize  good  soldiers  in 
the  days  of  peace. 

"  Under  these  impressions,  the  States  think  it  incumbent  upon  them 
to  return  their  warmest  thanks  to  Lieutenant-Colonel  Brown,  the 
officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  privates  of  the  79th  regiment, 
forming  part  of  this  garrison,  and  they  take  this  opportunity  of 
wishing  them  all  manner  of  success  and  prosperity  wherever  their 
King  and  country  may  require  their  services. 

(Signed)     "  FRANCIS  GODFRAY, 

"Greffr.,    L.S." 

In  the  month  of  May,  1820,  the  regiment  embarked  at  Plymouth 
for  Ireland,  and,  having  landed  at  Balnacurry,  it  marched  to  Fermoy 

barracks. 

1821. 

In  the  month  of  June  the  regiment  moved  to  Limerick,  furnishing 
detachments  to  Newport  and  Kildimo. 

1822. 

The  regiment  was  quartered  in  Limerick  until  May,  1822,  when 
it  was  moved  to  Templemore,  furnishing  detachments  to  Cashel, 
Nenagh,  and  Thurles. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  85 

When  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  about  to  leave  Limerick,  an 
address,  signed  by  the  Magistrates  and  Council,  was  presented  by  a 
deputation  from  that  body  to  Lieutenant-Colonel  Douglas,  command- 
ing the  regiment,  of  which  the  following  is  a  copy  :— 

"  To  Colonel  Neil  Douglas,  79th  regiment  (or  Cameron  High- 
landers). 

"  With  emotions  of  regret  we  have  heard  that  you  are  to 
march  hence  to-morrow,  and  we  cannot  allow  you  to  depart  from  this 
city  without  offering  you  the  respectful  and  heartfelt  tribute  of  our 
regard  and  admiration. 

"  During  a  residence  amongst  us  of  nearly  two  years,  you  have, 
with  little  intermission,  commanded  this  garrison,  and  your 
important  duties  you  have  performed  with  the  temperate  energy  and 
calm  dignity  of  the  accomplished  soldier. 

"  The  mild  manners  and  military  deportment  of  the  officers,  as  well 
as  the  excellent  discipline  and  moral  order  of  the  brave  men  whom 
you  so  well  command,  are  happily  evinced  in  the  general  esteem 
which  their  uniform  good  conduct  has  excited  in  this  city ;  and  we 
beg  of  you  to  convey  to  them  the  expression  of  our  highest  approba- 
tion. On  leaving  Limerick,  you  will  carry  with  you  our  best  wishes 
for  your  glory  and  safety,  and  we  sincerely  desire  for  you  what  your 
virtue  and  valour  so  justly  entitle  you  to  enjoy — the  blessing  of 
private  happiness,  and  the  well-merited  reward  of  public  honour." 

1823. 

In  the  month  of  April,  1823,  the  regiment  was  removed  from 
Templemore  to  Naas,  from  whence  it  furnished  detachments  to 
Drogheda,  Dundalk,  Baltinglas,  Irim,  and  Kilcock. 

In  October  of  the  same  year  it  moved  to  Dublin,  and  was  quartered 
in  the  Royal  barracks. 

1824. 

In  October,  1824,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  marched  from  Dublin 
to  Kilkenny,  supplying  detachments  to  Carlow  and  Cullen. 


86  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

1825. 

In  April,  1825,  orders  were  received  for  the  augmentation  of  the 
regiment  from  eight  to  ten  companies,  with  a  strength  of  740  rank 
and  file,  preparatory  to  its  proceeding  on  foreign  service  to  Canada, 
leaving  four  companies  on  home  service  as  a  regimental  depot.  In 
the  month  of  May  the  regiment  was  removed  from  Kilkenny  to  Cork 
with  a  view  to  its  embarkation. 

On  the  25th,  26th,  and  27th,  of  August  the  service  companies 
embarked  accordingly  under  command  of  Colonel  Sir  Neil  Douglas, 
in  three  divisions,  on  board  H.M.S.  Romney  and  the  Cato  and  Maria 
transports,  the  depot  companies  remaining  at  Cork  under  the  com- 
mand of  Major  William  Marshall.  The  various  divisions  arrived  in 
safety  at  Quebec  in  the  month  of  October,  and  were  quartered  in  the 
Jesuit  barracks. 

In  September  the  depot  companies  moved  from  Cork  to  Glasgow, 
where  they  remained  until  February,  1826. 

1826. 

In  February,  1826,  the  depot  companies  embarked  at  the  Broomie- 
law  for  Ireland  and  sailed  to  Belfast,  where  they  were  billeted  for  ten 
days.  They  then  proceeded  to  Armagh,  occupying  barracks  there  for 
fourteen  days  only,  when  they  marched  to  Newry  barracks.  Here 
they  remained  until  May,  when  they  moved  to  Cavan. 

1827. 

In  May,  1827,  the  depot  proceeded  from  Cavan  to  Belfast  barracks, 
detaching  one  company  to  Downpatrick  and  one  to  Carrickfergus. 

1828. 

In  February,  1828,  the  depot  was  removed  on  board  two  steam 
vessels  from  Belfast  to  Dublin,  where  it  landed  and  marched  into 
barracks  at  Birr.  On  the  9th  of  March  Sir  Alan  Cameron,  K.C.B., 
the  first  colonel  and  founder  of  the  corps,  died  at  Fulham. 

The  following  paragraph  appeared  in  the  Gentleman's  Magazine, 
from  the  pen  of  Colonel  Sir  William  Napier,  on  the  occasion  of  Sir 
Alan's  death  : — 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  87 

"  Died  at  Fulham,  on  the  9th  ult,  at  an  advanced  age, 
General  Sir  Alan  Cameron,  Colonel,  79th  regiment.  By  birth  a 
Highlander  ;  in  heart  and  soul  a  true  one  ;  in  form  and  frame  the 
bold  and  manly  mountaineer.  His  adventurous  career  in  early  life, 
and  subsequent  distinguished  gallantry  in  the  field,  gained  him 
considerable  celebrity,  together  with  the  unbounded  admiration  of  his 
countrymen.  The  son  of  a  private  gentleman,  but  ardent  and 
determined  in  accomplishing  whatever  he  undertook,  he  brought  to 
the  ranks  of  the  British  army  more  men  and  in  less  time  than  any 
other  who,  like  himself,  was  commissioned  to  raise  regiments  in  1793-4. 
During  the  American  war  he  had  the  misfortune  of  being  taken 
prisoner,  but  from  which  he  escaped  after  two  years  confinement  by 
an  act  of  desperate  daring.  Fate,  however,  brought  him  in  the  course 
of  his  life  the  rare  distinction  of  being  successively  commandant  of 
the  capitals  of  two  countries,  Denmark  and  Portugal,  1807-8. 
Although  of  late  years  he  was  not  able  to  go  among  his  friends,  yet 
they  were  always,  and  to  the  last,  found  at  his  house  and  around  his 
hospitable  table.  The  number  of  this  man's  acts  of  friendship  to  his 
countrymen  cannot  be  estimated,  therefore  the  blank  his  death  has 
created  will  be  better  understood  than  described." 

Mr.  Mackenzie  says  :  "  In  the  army  he  was  held  universally  popular, 
where,  in  consequence  of  his  familiar  habit  of  addressing  the  Irish 
and  Highland  soldiers  with  his  gaelic  salute  of  "  Cia  Mar  tha  thu"  — 
How  are  you  ?  he  was  known  as  "  Old  Cia  Mar 


On  the  24th  of  March,  1828,  Lieutenant  Sir  Ronald  Ferguson, 
G.C.B.,  was  appointed  colonel  of  the  regiment,  in  succession  to 
Lieutenant-General  Sir  Alan  Cameron,  K.C.B. 

In  the  beginning  of  June,  the  same  year,  the  service  companies 
proceeded  from  Quebec  to  Montreal,  from  whence  they  furnished 
small  detachments  to  occupy  St.  Johns,  Coteau-du-lac,  and  Isle  Aux 
Noix. 

On  the  18th  of  June,  1828,  the  regiment  was  presented  with  new 
colours,  the  gift  of  its  gallant  colonel,  Lieutenant-General  Sir  R.  C. 
Ferguson,  G.C.B.  The  presentation  took  place  on  the  Champ-de- 


88  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Mars,  in  presence  of  a  very  numerous  assemblage  of  the  inhabitants 
of  Montreal  and  its  vicinity,  who  were  eager  to  witness  the  ceremony. 
At  a  quarter  to  one  o'clock  the  parade  was  formed,  and  the  troops 
wheeled  into  line  to  receive  his  Excellency  the  governor,  Lieutenant- 
General  the  Earl  of  Dalhousie,  the  Montreal  troop  of  Volunteer 
cavalry  being  on  the  right,  the  Montreal  Volunteer  rifle  company  in  the 
centre,  and  the  79th  Highlanders  on  the  left.  Precisely  at  one  o'clock 
His  Excellency  came  on  the  ground  accompanied  by  his  staff,  and 
was  received  with  a  general  salute.  The  Grenadier  company,  com- 
manded by  Captain  Young,  marched  to  the  quarters  of  Colonel  Sir 
Neil  Douglas,  received  the  new  colours  whilst  the  drums  beat  the 
"  point  of  war,"  and  planted  them  in  front  of  the  saluting  flag,  in 
charge  of  two  sentries.  The  regiment  then  formed  three  sides  of  a 
square.  His  Excellency,  with  his  staff  and  Lady  Douglas,  then  came 
forward,  the  colours  were  unfurled,  and  the  ceremony  of  consecration 
performed  by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Stevens.  After  which,  Lady  Douglas, 
placing  the  colours  in  the  hands  of  Sir  Neil  Douglas,  addressed  him 
as  follows  : — 

"  The  honour  has  this  day  devolved  upon  me  of  presenting  to  the 
79th  Highlanders  a  new  set  of  colours.  I  need  not  say  how  nobly 
and  gloriously  the  regiment  has  supported  those  which  are  now  so 
decayed,  and  which — like  veteran  warriors — have  been  worn  and 
shattered  in  their  country's  cause  ;  the  deeds  of  the  regiment  are 
again  emblazoned  on  those  which  I  now  present  to  you.  Take  them 
to  your  hearts !  and  while  the  breasts  of  soldiers  glow  with  honourable 
zeal  for  their  beloved  country,  I  am  confident  that  the  79th  will  ever 
protect  these  with  a  devotion  worthy  of  their  native  land,  with  steady 
courage  and  fidelity  to  their  beloved  Sovereign." 

Lieutenants  Thomas  and  Lachlan  Cameron  of  the  Grenadiers, 
having  advanced,  received  the  colours.  Sir  Neil  Douglas  then 
addressed  Lady  Douglas,  His  Excellency,  and  the  79th,  in  the  follow- 
ing terms  : — 

"  It  affords  me  great  pleasure  in  this  ceremony  passing  through  your 
hands  ;  and  I  thank  you  very  much  for  the  handsome  manner  in 
which  you  have  performed  it. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  89 

"  My  Lord,  in  my  own  name,  and  that  of  the  79th,  I  beg  to  return 
our  warmest  thanks  for  the  kind  support  you  have  this  day  afforded 
us,  and  to  assure  your  lordship  that  every  individual  in  the  regiment 
feels  most  grateful  for  this  additional  favour  to  the  many  which  we 
have  already  received  at  your  lordship's  hands. 

"  Soldiers  !  on  this  great  anniversary  I  am  proud  to  receive  these 
new  standards,  and  to  your  keeping  I  with  confidence  commit  them, 
feeling  assured,  from  the  experience  of  many  trying  and  difficult 
occasions,  how  safe  the  precious  deposit  will  remain  in  the  keeping  of 
men,  who,  with  pride  I  say  it,  have  ever  conducted  themselves  in  the 
most  gallant  and  intrepid  manner.  Receive  them  then  79th,  continue 
to  signalise  yourselves  for  order  and  regularity  in  quarters,  as  you  have 
ever  done  for  courage  in  the  field  ;  and  be  assured,  that  your  reward 
will  be  the  favour  of  your  Sovereign  and  the  esteem  and  goodwill  of 
your  fellow  citizens." 

His  Excellency  the  Earl  of  Dalhousie,  addressing  Sir  Neil  Douglas, 
replied  as  follows  : — 

"While  the  79th  continues  to  perform  its  duty  as  it  has  hitherto 
done  under  my  own  observation,  I  shall  ever  feel  gratified  in  my 
expression  of  the  approbation  of  its  conduct." 

His  Lordship  then  addressed  the  regiment  as  follows : — 

"  79th,  the  colours  which  you  have  now  received  bear  upon  them 
the  names  of  bright  and  chivalrous  deeds.  I  would  desire  to  impress 
upon  you,  on  this  momentous  occasion,  the  obligation  you  are  under 
to  protect  these  standards  with  your  lives,  to  remain  by  them  in  cir- 
cumstances of  difficulty  and  danger,  as  well  as  in  the  bright  hour  of 
victory  ;  and  as  you  have  every  reason  to  be  proud  of  the  reputation  you 
have  acquired  for  valour  in  the  field,  let  it  be  your  emulation  to  hand 
down  that  reputation  untarnished  to  your  successors.  This  end  you 
will  most  assuredly  attain  by  obedience  to  your  superiors,  gallantry  in 
the  field,  steadiness  in  quarters,  and  devotion  to  the  person  of  His 
Majesty  the  King." 

The  Grenadier  company,  with  the  new  colours,  now  marched  round 
the  square,  while  the  band  played  the  National  Anthem — the  regiment 


90  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

presenting  arms  as  they  passed  along  ;  the  same  company  also 
marched  to  the  barracks,  and  deposited  the  old  colours  in  Sir  Neil 
Douglas's  quarters.  At  the  conclusion  of  these  ceremonies,  the  regi- 
ment marched  past  in  slow  and  quick  time,  and  then  returned  to 
barracks. 

1829. 

In  the  month  of  April,  1829,  the  depot  of  the  regiment  marched 
from  Birr  to  Dublin,  embarked  for  Liverpool,  and,  upon  arrival  there, 
proceeded  to  Burnley,  in  Lancashire. 

In  the  month  of  May  the  regiment  moved  from  Montreal  to  Kings- 
ton, from  whence  it  supplied  detachments  to  Fort  Henry,  Point 
Frederick,  and  Prescott. 

In  the  month  of  October  the  regimental  depot  moved  from  Burn- 
ley to  Liverpool,  where  it  embarked  for  Scotland,  and,  landing  at 
Glasgow,  marched  to  Stirling  Castle. 

1830. 

On  the  3rd  of  August,  1830,  Sir  Neil  Douglas  left  Kingston  to 
return  to  England  for  the  recovery  of  his  health,  which  was  much 
impaired  by  the  effects  of  several  severe  wounds.  On  this  occasion 
a  tribute,  most  gratifying  to  his  feelings,  was  paid  to  this  highly-dis- 
tinguished soldier  by  the  corporation  of  Kingston,  which  presented 
him  with  the  following  address, — whilst  many  of  the  veteran  soldiers 
of  the  regiment  were  moved  to  tears  at  the  departure  of  their  warm- 
hearted and  much-loved  commander,  who  had  so  often  led  them  to 
victory,  and  who  had  been  in  uninterrupted  command  of  the  regi- 
ment for  the  previous  eighteen  years  of  his  life  : — 

"To  Colonel  Sir  Neil  Douglas,  K.C.B.,  A.D.C.  to  His  Majesty. 

11  SIR, 

"  We,  the  undersigned  inhabitants  of  the  town  of  Kingston, 
cannot  witness  your  departure  from  among  us  without  testifying  to 
you  in  this  public  manner  our  unfeigned  respect  and  esteem.  We 
deeply  regret  that  ill-health  deprives  the  town  of  Kingston  of  the 
presence  of  an  officer,  distinguished,  not  more  by  his  merits  in  the 
service  of  his  king  and  country,  than  for  the  kindness  of  his  dis- 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  9l 

position,  the  urbanity  of  his  manners,  and  his  uniform  endeavours 
to  promote  cheerfulness  and  happiness  around  him.  In  returning 
to  your  native  country,  we  trust  you  will  derive  much  benefit  from 
a  change  of  air  and  of  climate,  and  hope  that,  with  health 
restored  and  undiminished  happiness,  we  shall  again  shortly  see  you 
at  the  head  of  the  distinguished  corps  which  you  have  so  long 
commanded. 

"  Wishing  yourself  and  Lady  Douglas  and  children  the  best  pro- 
tection of  a  kind  Providence,  and  a  safe  and  pleasant  voyage, 

"  We  remain,  with  much  regard,  &c.,  &c., 

(Signed) 
"  THE  MEMBERS  OF  THE  CORPORATION  OF  KINGSTON." 

In  the  month  of  September,  1830,  the  depot  of  the  regiment 
marched  from  Stirling  to  Glasgow,  and  in  the  following  month  it  again 
marched  from  Glasgow  to  Edinburgh  Castle. 

1831. 

The  regiment  was  removed  from  Kingston  in  the  month  of  May, 
1831,  and  ordered  to  Toronto,  where  it  was  called  upon  to  furnish 
the  following  detachments  : — No.  3  company,  under  Captain  Riach, 
to  Amherstburgh ;  No.  4  company,  under  Captain  Forbes,  to  Fort 
George ;  and  2  sergeants  and  40  rank  and  file,  under  Lieutenant 
Matheson,  to  Penitanguishine. 

In  the  same  month  the  depot  companies  marched  from  Edinburgh 
Castle  to  Granton,  and  proceeded  by  steamer  to  Aberdeen,  where 
they  landed  and  occupied  barracks. 

The  undermentioned  non-commissioned  officer  and  men  died  whilst 
the  regiment  was  quartered  in  Kingston  and  Toronto  in  1830  and 
1831 :— 


Corporal  Donald  Keith 
Private     William  Sinclair 
„          John  Cockburn 
„          William  Blissett 
„          James  Chisholm 
John  Walker 


Private  John  McGarraty 
„         Samuel  McGarraty 
.,         William  Brown 
„         Donald  McPhee 
„         Hugh  Cameron 
Alan  Cameron 


92  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

1832, 

In  the  month  of  May,  1832,  the  depot  of  the  regiment  marched 
from  Aberdeen,  in  two  divisions,  to  Perth,  where  it  occupied  barracks. 

On  June  5th  Lieutenant-Colonel  McDougall  joined  from  England, 
and  assumed  command  of  the  regiment. 

During  the  months  of  July  and  August  cholera  appeared  in  the 
regiment,  and  there  were  several  deaths ;  but,  by  the  10th  of  Septem- 
ber it  had  entirely  disappeared.  The  following  officers,  non-commis- 
sioned officers,  and  men  were  publicly  thanked  in  regimental  orders 
for  their  courage  and  devotion  in  attending  to  the  sick  :  Captains 
Young  and  Forbes  ;  Doctor  Fraser  ;  Sergeants  Begg,  McGregor,  and 
McGee;  Corporal  Rennie;  Privates  George  Thompson  (who  died 
of  the  disease),  William  Gould,  James  Deans,  James  Mitchell,  John 
Wilson,  and  John  Neilson. 

In  November,  1832,  the  flank  companies  of  the  regiment  were 
detached  to  Montreal,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel  McDougall,  in  aid 
of  the  civil  authorities,  in  consequence  of  a  succession  of  political 
riots  in  that  city. 

1833. 

In  May,  1833,  the  regiment  was  removed  from  Toronto  to  Quebec, 
where  it  was  quartered  in  the  Jesuit  barracks.  On  this  occasion  it 
furnished  detachments  to  Grosse  Isle  and  Sorel. 

In  the  same  month  the  depot  of  the  regiment  was  removed  from 
Perth  to  Dundee  barracks ;  and  in  the  month  of  December,  in  the 
same  year,  it  again  moved  from  Dundee  to  Perth. 

On  the  18th  of  May,  Captain  Riach's  detachment,  No.  3  com- 
pany, was  ordered  to  return  to  head-quarters  from  Amherstburgh ;  and, 
on  the  occasion  of  his  leaving  that  station,  he  was  presented  with  the 
following  flattering  address  from  the  magistrates  and  residents  of  the 
town : — 

"  To  Captain  Riach,  commanding  at  Amherstburgh. 
"  SIR, 

"  Understanding  that  the  detachment  of  the  79th  regiment 
under  your  command  is  about  to  be  removed  from  this  post,  we  can- 
not refrain  from  expressing  our  regret  at  the  loss  which  our  little 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  93 

society  will  sustain  by  being  deprived  of  you  and  your  amiable  lady, 
who,  by  your  courtesy,  have  added  so  much  to  its  happiness,  have 
recommended  yourselves  to  the  affections  of  all,  and  will  leave  a 
pleasing  and  lasting  memorial  in  every  heart.  We  hope  you  will 
receive  this,  inadequate  though  it  is,  as  a  testimony  of  our  esteem, 
and  a  token  of  our  sense  of  your  worth. 

"  To  the  other  officers  under  your  command  we  must  also  pay  our 
deserved  tribute  of  praise,  on  account  of  their  affability  of  deport- 
ment and  agreeable  manners. 

"The  uniform,  peaceable,  and  orderly  conduct  of  all  under  your 
orders — non-commissioned  officers  and  privates — claims  our  highest 
approbation  ;  and  may  we  request  that  you  will  communicate  to  them 
our  sense  of  their  merits,  and  our  hope,  that,  in  addition  to  the  glory 
which  your  regiment  has  acquired  by  its  arms  in  the  tented  field,  it 
will  ever,  by  the  same  propriety  of  conduct  which  those  stationed 
here  have  observed,  merit  the  good  wishes  of  all  in  time  of  peace. 

"Wishing  yourself,  lady,  and  family,  long  life,  prosperity,  and 
happiness, 

"  We  have  the  honour  to  be, 

"  Sir, 

"  Your  obedient  humble  servants, 
(Signed) 
"  THE  MAGISTRATES  AND  GENTLEMEN  OF  AMHERSTBURGH." 

As  the  detachment  was  returning  down  Lake  Erie,  to  Quebec,  a 
sad  accident  occurred ;  the  boiler  of  the  steamer  burst,  causing  the 
death  of  two  of  the  crew  and  serious  injuries  to  several  men  of  the 
79th. 

On  the  6th  of  September,  1833,  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel  Duncan 
McDougall  succeeded  to  the  command  of  the  regiment,  by  the  retire- 
ment of  Sir  Neil  Douglas,  K.C.B.,  A.D.C.,  on  half  pay. 

1834. 

In  June,  1834,  the  depot  of  the  regiment  marched  from  Perth  bar- 
racks to  Stirling  Castle. 

On  January  23rd  the  old  Chateau  (Castle  of  St.  Louis)  at  Quebec, 


94  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

was  burnt  to  the  ground.  The  79th  and  other  troops  in  the  garrison 
did  their  utmost  to  subdue  the  flames  ;  but  the  cold  was  so  intense 
that  all  the  water  in  the  engines  was  frozen,  and  it  was  found 
impossible  to  save  the  building. 

1835. 

On  the  13th  of  March,  1835,  Major  Robert  Ferguson  was  pro- 
moted to  the  lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  regiment,  in  succession  to 
Lieutenant-Colonel  McDougall,  retired. 

In  June,  1835,  the  regimental  depot  embarked  on  board  two  steam 
vessels  at  Stirling,  and  proceeded  to  Aberdeen,  where  it  landed  and 
went  into  barracks.  In  July,  cholera  broke  out  in  Quebec,  and  there 
were  several  fatal  cases  in  the  regiment. 

1836. 

In  May,  1836,  the  depot  was  removed  from  Aberdeen  to  Edinburgh 
Castle ;  and  in  the  month  of  August  of  the  same  year  it  marched 
from  Edinburgh  to  Paisley  barracks. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  were  stationed  in  Quebec  during  the 
remainder  of  their  foreign  service.  In  the  month  of  September,  1836, 
the  regiment  embarked  for  England,  under  the  command  of  Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Robert  Ferguson,  and  on  the  llth  of  October  landed 
at  Leith  and  marched  to  Glasgow,  where  it  was  joined  by  the  regi- 
mental depot  from  Paisley.  Whilst  stationed  at  Glasgow  the  regiment 
furnished  a  detachment  to  Dumbarton  Castle. 

Previous  to  its  embarking  for  England,  the  following  general  order 
was  issued  by  Lieutenant-General  Sir  John  Colborne,  K.C  B.,  com- 
manding the  forces  in  North  America  : — 

"Quebec,  3rd  September,  1836. 

"The  79th  Highlanders  being  about  to  embark  for  home,  after  a 
long  absence  from  their  native  land,  the  Lieutenant-General  com- 
manding thinks  it  his  duty,  on  their  embarkation,  to  express  in  general 
orders  his  satisfaction  at  their  exemplary  conduct  during  the  period 
they  have  served  in  Canada. 

"  The  Lieutenant-General  offers  them  his  best  wishes  for  their  wel- 
fare, and  is  persuaded  that  in  whatever  service  they  may  be  employed 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  95 

they  will  always  continue  to  maintain  the  high  reputation  which  they 
have  ever  so  justly  borne. 

(Signed)  "  JOHN  EDEN,  Lieutenant-Colonel, 

"  D.A.  General." 

1837. 

In  the  month  of  June,  1837,  the  regiment  marched  from  Glasgow 
to  Edinburgh  Castle,  where  it  furnished  a  small  detachment  to  Green- 
law  barracks.  It  remained  at  Edinburgh  till  the  month  of  June  in  the 
following  year,  when  it  was  ordered  to  Dublin.  The  regiment 
accordingly  marched  to  Glasgow  by  divisions,  where — steamers  being 
in  readiness  for  their  conveyance — they  embarked  immediately,  and 
upon  landing  at  Dublin  were  quartered  in  Richmond  barracks. 

1839. 

In  consequence  of  the  disturbed  state  of  several  of  the  manufac- 
turing districts  in  England  in  the  month  of  May,  1839,  the  regiment 
received  orders  to  proceed  with  all  possible  despatch  to  Liverpool, 
there  to  await  further  orders.  It  accordingly  embarked  in  two  divi- 
sions on  the  30th  and  31st,  and  landed  at  Liverpool  on  the  following 
days  respectively,  when  it  was  billeted  throughout  the  town.  On  the 
3rd  of  June  it  was  conveyed  by  rail  to  Manchester,  where  it  was  again 
billeted — detachments  being  ordered  to  Halifax  and  Newcastle-under- 
Lyne.  After  a  month's  residence  in  billets,  the  regiment  occupied 
a  temporary  barrack  prepared  for  its  reception  in  Tib  Street,  when  it 
furnished  an  additional  detachment  to  Rochdale. 

1840. 

In  the  month  of  June,  1840,  the  head-quarters  of  the  regiment 
moved  to  Haydock  Lodge — near  Warrington — with  detachments  at 
Bolton,  Liverpool,  Wigan,  and  Stockport. 

In  the  month  of  August  following  the  regiment  received  orders  to 
hold  itself  in  readiness  to  proceed  on  foreign  service  to  Gibraltar, 
and  consequently  a  regimental  depot  was  formed  at  Stockport  on  the 
10th  of  September,  under  Major  Andrew  Brown.  On  the  9th  of 


96  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

November  the  detachments  at  Wigan  and  Bolton,  consisting  of  two 
companies,  were  withdrawn,  and  having  formed  a  junction  at  Warring- 
ton,  proceeded  under  the  command  of  Captain  T.  L.  Butler  by  railway 
to  Deptford,  where  they  embarked,  together  with  the  service 
companies  of  the  first  battalion  Rifle  Brigade,  under  orders  for  Corfu, 
on  board  the  transport  Abercrombie  Robertson,  and  landed  at  Gibraltar 
on  the  2nd  of  January,  1841. 

On  the  26th  of  November,  1840,  the  head-quarters  marched  from 
Haydock  Lodge,  and,  with  the  several  detachments  forming  the  service 
companies,  assembled  at  Warrington  on  the  morning  of  that  date, 
and  proceeded  by  railway  to  Weedon  barracks,  which  the  regiment 
occupied  until  the  31st  of  December  following,  when  it  was  removed 
in  two  divisions  by  railway  to  Deptford,  and  embarked  on  board  the 
Boyne  and  Prince  Regent  transports,  under  the  command  of  Major 
the  Honourable  Landerdale  Maule.  In  a  few  days  both  vessels 
proceeded  to  sea,  and  arrived  at  Gibraltar  on  the  25th  and  26th  of 
January,  1841,  respectively. 

1841. 

On  the  27th  of  April,  1841,  Major-General  the  Honourable  John 
Ramsay  was  appointed  Colonel  in  succession  to  General  Sir  Ronald 
Ferguson,  G.C.B.,  deceased. 

In  the  month  of  May,  1841,  the  depot  moved  from  Stockport  to 
Paisley  barracks,  where  it  remained  until  June,  1842,  when  it  proceeded 
to  Aberdeen. 

On  the  8th  of  June,  1841,  Major  Andrew  Brown  succeeded  to 
the  lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  regiment,  vice  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Robert  Ferguson,  retired. 

On  the  29th  of  October,  1841,  Colonel  John  Carter,  K.H.,  from  the 
1st  Royals,  obtained  the  command  of  the  79th  by  exchange  with 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Andrew  Brown. 

1842. 

On  the  14th  of  June,  1842,  Major  the  Honourable  Landerdale 
Maule  was  promoted  to  the  lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  regiment,  in 
succession  to  Colonel  Carter,  K.H.,  retired  on  half  pay. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


97 


On  the  14th  of  July,  1842,  Lieutenant  -  General  Sir  James 
Macdonnell,  K.C.B.,  was  appointed  colonel,  vice  Major-General  the 
Honourable  J.  Ramsay,  deceased. 

1844. 

In  February,  1844,  the  depot  companies  were  removed  from 
Aberdeen  to  Stirling  Castle,  and  in  April  following  proceeded  to 
Londonderry  in  Ireland.  In  the  month  of  July  in  the  same  year 
they  again  changed  stations,  having  been  removed  from  Londonderry 

to  barracks  at  Naas. 

1845. 

In  the  Month  of  September,  1845,  the  regimental  depot  was 
moved  from  Naas  to  Belturbet  barracks. 

On  the  1st  of  September  the  undermentioned  non-commissioned 
officers  and  men  were  publicly  thanked  by  the  Governor  of  Gibraltar, 
in  orders,  for  their  great  gallantry  in  saving  the  lives  of  two  soldiers, 
who  had  been  capsized  in  a  boat  in  the  harbour. 

Corporal  John  Ross     -     -     -     - 
Private     John    Aitkeu    -     -     - 

.,          Archibald  Livingston 

,,          Robert  McDiarmid 

Thomas  Scotland  -     - 


Hugh  Hamilton 
William  Martin 
William  Craig  . 
Lewis  Gagely  - 
Thomas  Robinson 
Mclvor  -  -  - 
McMahon  -  - 
Gray  ... 


79th. 


Sappers  and  Miners. 


1st  Royals. 


1846. 

The  depot  companies  were  ordered  from  Belturbet  to  Mullingar  in 
July,  1846,  from  whence  in  August  following  they  proceeded  to 
barracks  at  Castlebar. 

1847. 

In  May  the  depot  was  removed  from  Castlebar  to  Boyle  barracks, 
and  in  November  of  the  same  year  its  station  was  again  changed  from 
Boyle  to  Mullingar. 

H 


98 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 


1848. 

On  the  7th  of  June  the  regiment  embarked  on  board  H.M.S. 
Resistance  at  Gibraltar  for  Canada,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  the  Honourable  Landerdale  Maule ;  and,  after  a  prosperous 
voyage,  arrived  at  Quebec  on  the  27th  of  July  following.  On  the  28th 
the  regiment  disembarked  and  occupied  the  Citadel  barracks. 

Previous  to  the  embarkation  of  the  regiment  for  Canada  a 
handsome  marble  tablet  was  erected  by  voluntary  contribution  of  the 
officers  and  men  in  the  Wesleyan  Chapel  at  Gibraltar  (where  divine 
service  was  held  for  the  Presbyterian  soldiers  of  the  garrison),  to  the 
memory  of  those  non-commissioned  officers  and  soldiers,  who  died 
during  their  period  of  service  on  the  Rock.  The  following  is  the 
inscription  thus  recorded  on  the  tablet : — 

TO    THE    MEMORY 

OF     THE      UNDERMENTIONED 

NON-COMMISSIONED     OFFICERS     AND     PRIVATES 

OF  THE 

CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS, 
A.D.  1841—1847. 

Cuimhne 
Nan  Sonn  Nach  Maireann. 


79th  REGIMENT. 


918     Sergeant 

W.  Brodie        4th  Company 

At.H  f  Colour-  1 
467  1  Sergeant/ 

T.  Mercer         Light     ,, 

1163    Private 

S.  Gardner      2nd        ,, 

1661         „ 

J.  Taylor          Gr. 

1869        „ 

D.  Stewart      2nd         ,, 

406        „ 

W.  Abbot        1st          „ 

1724        „ 

D.  Gumming  Light     ,, 

1865        ,, 

D.  Ross             4th        „ 

1081         „ 

J.  Robertson   3rd         ,, 

251         „ 

R.  Fowls          4th         „ 

889        „ 

J.  Kerr            2nd 

Obit     23rd  February  1841 
24th  May  „ 

,,        24th  August  ,, 

,,        19th  November       ,, 
,,        19th  December       ,, 

„        7th  January  1842 
„        19th  March  „ 

31st  May  „ 

,,        3rd  July  ,, 

,,        20th  August  ,, 

21st  October 


79'fH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


99 


1131   Private 

G.  Cloriac 

Gr.  Company 

Obit    9th  November 

1842 

1400        „ 

W.  Dickson 

3rd 

„        24th  February 

1843 

1578 

T.  Millar 

1st          „ 

„        7th  April 

,, 

1031         „ 

Wm.  Connell 

1st          „ 

„        20th  May 

ii 

325  Corporal 

G.  Hall 

3rd         „ 

„        22nd  August 

ii 

1318        „ 

A.  Gemmell 

1st 

„        10th  April 

1844 

904  Private 

A  McDonald 

Gr. 

„        17th  February 

1845 

1791         „ 

J.  Leadine 

3rd 

,,        27th  February 

ii 

IftQQ 

G.  McGregor 

Gr          „ 

1846 

|| 

595        „ 

Samuel  Young 

1st         „ 

„        24th  August 

833        „ 

J.  McPherson 

Light     „ 

„        22nd  October 

ii 

818 

D.  Spence 

2nd        „ 

,,        3rd  November 

„ 

1475 

Chas.  Dunnet 

2nd         „ 

,,        10th  February 

1847 

1830 

G.  Litster 

Gr. 

,,        17th  March 

ii 

885        „ 

W.  Baxter 

1st         ,, 

,,        5th  April 

ii 

1152        „ 

J.  Stirling 

1st         „        - 

,,        14th  June 

M 

1646 

H.  Muir 

1st 

,,        13th  September 

,, 

In  the  month  of  November,  1848,  the  station  of  the  regimental 
depot  was  changed  from  Mullingar  to  Nenagh. 

1849. 

On  the  8th  of  February,  1849,  Major-General  James  Hay,  C.B., 
was  appointed  colonel  in  succession  to  Lieutenant-General  Sir  James 
Macdonnell,  K.C.B.,  appointed  to  the  colonelcy  of  the  71st  Foot. 

Sergeant  Donald  Mackenzie,  who  was  discharged  from  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  1832,  died  in  France  in  1849,  where  he  was  residing 
with  the  relations  of  his  wife,  a  Frenchwoman.  He  left  an  orphan 
daughter  totally  destitute,  and  Sir  Duncan  McDougall,  with  that  kind 
interest  he  always  manifested  in  everything  connected  with  the  79th, 
not  only  whilst  the  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  corps,  but  also  since  he 
ceased  to  command  it,  received  the  child  into  his  own  family,  and 
originated  in  London  a  subscription  for  the  purpose  of  purchasing  the 
right  of  admission  for  an  orphan,  during  a  period  of  21  years,  into  the 
Royal  Caledonian  Asylum.  The  sum  of  one  hundred  guineas  was 
accordingly  subscribed  for  this  purpose  by  officers  lately  belonging  to 
the  79th  and  those  serving  in  the  regiment. 

In  the  month  of  July  there  was  one  case  of  cholera  in  the  regiment 
at  Quebec. 


100  HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 

1850. 

In  the  month  of  April,  1850,  the  depot  of  the  regiment  was 
removed  from  Nenagh  to  Kinsale ;  in  May  following  it  was  ordered 
to  Cork,  and  in  June,  the  same  year,  it  embarked  at  Cork  for  England, 
landed  at  Liverpool,  and  proceeded  by  railway  to  Preston.  The 
depot  occupied  barracks  at  Preston  until  the  month  of  November, 
when  it  proceeded  by  railway  to  Berwick-upon-Tweed. 

1851. 

In  April,  1851,  the  depot  companies  were  removed  from  Berwick- 
upon-Tweed  by  railway  to  Stirling  Castle. 

In  the  month  of  June,  1851,  the  service  companies  received  orders 
of  readiness  to  embark  for  England,  and  on  the  4th  of  August  they 
embarked  accordingly,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  the 
Honourable  Landerdale  Maule,  in  the  freight-ship  Herefordshire,  and, 
after  a  highly  favourable  voyage,  arrived  in  Leith  Roads  on  the  30th 
of  the  same  month.  On  the  1st  of  September  the  regiment  dis- 
embarked, the  head-quarters  proceeding  to  Stirling  Castle  and  forming 
a  junction  with  the  depot,  whilst  three  companies  were  detached  to 
Perth  and  three  to  Dundee. 

When  the  regiment  was  about  to  embark  for  England  a  highly 
complimentary  letter  was  addressed  to  Lieutenant-Colonel  the  Hon- 
ourable Landerdale  Maule  by  the  Magistrates  and  Council  of  Quebec, 
of  which  the  following  is  a  copy  : — 

"Quebec,  29th  July,  1851. 

"To  Lieutenant-Colonel  the  Honourable  Landerdale  Maule, 
"  Commanding  the  79th  Highlanders. 

"The  Magistrates  of  this  city  have  learned  with  regret  that  the 
expiration  of  your  period  of  service  here  will  shortly  cause  the  removal 
of  yourself  and  your  distinguished  regiment  from  amongst  them. 

"They  avail  themselves  of  this  occasion  to  acknowledge  their 
obligation  to  you  for  your  willing  and  efficient  co-operation  with  them 
upon  all  occasions  when  your  aid  was  required  to  assist  them  in  the 
performance  of  their  duties,  nor  can  they  pass  over  without  acknow- 
ledgment the  cordial  manner  in  which  you  and  your  officers  have  at 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


101 


all  times  contributed  to  the  amusements  of  the  citizens  of  Quebec. 
"It  is  with  great  pleasure  that  the  Magistrates  bear  testimony  to  the 
excellent  conduct  of  the  men  of  your  regiment  during  their  sojourn  in 
Quebec,  where  they  will  be  long  and  favourably  remembered. 

"  With  our  warmest  wishes  for  your  welfare,  and  that  of  the  officers 
and  men  of  your  corps,  we  beg  to  subscribe  ourselves,  &c. 
"  SIGNED  BY  THE  WHOLE  OF  THE 

"  MAGISTRATES  AND  COUNCIL." 

Previous  to  the  embarkation  of  the  regiment  at  Quebec  for  England, 
a  handsome  marble  tablet  was  erected  by  voluntary  contributions  of 
the  officers  and  men  in  the  Scotch  Presbyterian  Church  of  St. 
Andrew's  in  that  city,  to  the  memory  of  those  non-commissioned 
officers  and  soldiers  who  died  during  their  period  of  service  in  Canada, 
bearing  the  following  inscription  : — 

LXXIX. 

CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 

To  THE  MEMORY  OF 
THEIR    COMRADES, 

WHO  DEPARTED   THIS   LIFE   WHILST  SERVING 
IN  CANADA, 

A.D.    1848—1851. 

Cuimhne 
Nan  sonn  nach  Maireann. 


1179     Drummer 

John  Tabram 

Gr.  Company       Obit  5th  August 

1848 

701f  Lance-    I 
\  Corporal  / 

J.  McLeod 

4th       ,, 

„      23rd  September 

ii 

1369     Private 

Peter  McLean 

2nd       ,, 

,,     30th  September 

ii 

827 

Archd.  Fletcher 

4th       „ 

,,     6th  January 

1849 

1189 

Robert  Kerr 

3rd       „         - 

„     8th  July 

ti 

937 

James  Porter 

3rd        ,, 

„     llth  July 

» 

2137         „ 

Wm.  Drummond 

3rd       „         - 

„     13th  July 

i) 

1602    Corporal 

James  Ewart 

3rd       „ 

„     13th  July 

» 

1104     Private 

John  Keith 

2nd       „ 

„     14th  July 

n 

2431 

Wm.  Jarvie 

4th       „ 

„     17th  July 

,, 

1240        „ 

Alex.  McLachlan 

1st       „ 

„     18th  July 

tt 

102 


HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 


2327 

Private 

Wm.  Kitchen 

Gr. 

Company 

2395 

,, 

John  McKinnon 

1st 

,, 

2123 

,, 

James  Fleming 

1st 

» 

792 

,, 

John  Garn 

4th 

>> 

836-| 

f  Lance-    \ 
[  Sergeant  J 

Wm.  Fairley 

2nd 

,, 

1401  j 

f  Qr.-Mr.  ) 
[  Sergeant  / 

Jas.  Wilson 

Gr. 

» 

2655 

Private 

Neil  Campbell 

4th 

» 

894 

Sergeant 

Archd.  Ewing 

Gr. 

» 

1731 

Private 

G.  L.  Dickinson 

4th 

,, 

828 

,, 

Duncan  Matheson 

Gr. 

» 



ii 

Wm.  Fleming 

Gr. 

„ 

976 

ii 

Angus  Gunn 

3rd 

,, 

2508 

,, 

Angus  Gunn 

1st 

,, 

Obit  6th  August  1849 

,,  7th  September       ,, 

,,  8th  December        ,, 

„  22nd  February  1850 

,,  19th  March  „ 

„  30th  May  ,, 

„  25th  December      „ 

„  5th  February  1851 

,,  18th  March  „ 

,,  28th  April  „ 

„  21st  May 

,,  26th  May  ,, 

10th  June 


1852. 


On  the  25th  of  February,  1852,  the  regiment  moved  from  Stirling 
to  Edinburgh,  from  whence  it  supplied  a  small  detachment  to  Green- 
law  barracks,  leaving  detachments  at  Stirling,  Perth,  and  Dundee. 
In  the  month  of  May  the  three  latter  detachments  were  withdrawn, 
and  joined  at  Edinburgh  Castle. 

On  the  24th  of  December,  1852,  Major  Edmund  James  Elliot 
succeeded  to  the  command  of  the  regiment  as  lieutenant-colonel, 
by  the  retirement  of  the  Honourable  Landerdale  Maule  on  half  pay. 

1853. 

In  April,  1853,  the  regiment  proceeded  by  railway  from  Edinburgh 
to  Bury,  in  Lancashire,  where  the  head-quarters  with  two  companies 
were  stationed,  having  detachments  at  Burnley,  Ashton-under-Lyne, 
Stockport,  and  the  Isle  of  Man.  On  the  13th  of  June  following  the 
regiment  changed  quarters  from  Bury  to  Preston,  where  the  several 
detachments  joined,  with  the  exception  of  one  company  at  the  Isle  of 
Man.  On  the  28th  of  June  the  regiment  was  again  removed  from 
Preston  to  Weedon,  and  the  detachment  from  the  Isle  of  Man  having 
re-joined  on  the  14th  of  July,  the  79th  proceeded  by  railway  from 
Weedon  to  Staines  and  marched  to  the  encampment  at  Chobham, 
where  it  was  brigaded  with  the  19th  and  97th  regiments,  under  the 
command  of  Colonel  Lockyer,  K.H. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  103 

The  regiment  remained  for  some  time  under  canvas  at  Chobham, 
performing  various  field  operations  with  the  other  troops — consisting 
of  three  brigades,  with  artillery  and  cavalry,  forming  one  division 
under  the  command  of  General  Lord  Seaton,  G.C.B.  During  the 
period  of  its  service  at  Chobham  camp,  the  division  had,  on  more 
than  one  occasion,  the  honour  of  being  reviewed  by  Her  Majesty  the 
Queen,  their  Royal  Highnesses  Prince  Albert  and  the  Duke  of 
Cambridge,  the  General  commanding-in-chief,  and  many  other  dis- 
tinguished persons.  On  the  20th  of  August  the  encampment  was 
broken  up,  when  the  79th  marched  to  Farnborough  station  and 
proceeded  by  railway  to  Portsmouth,  where  it  occupied  the  Cambridge 

and  Colewort  barracks. 

1854. 

In  consequence  of  the  declaration  of  war  with  Russia,  on  the  1st 
of  March,  1854,  the  79th  received  orders  to  hold  itself  in  readiness 
to  embark  for  Turkey  to  join  the  army  assembling  under  the  command 
of  General  Lord  Raglan,  G.C.B. 

Immediate  preparations  were  accordingly  made  to  complete  the 
regiment  to  the  requisite  strength  by  the  admission  of  volunteers  from 
other  corps. 

On  the  24th  of  March,  1854,  Lieutenant-General  W.  H.  Sewell, 
C.B.,  was  appointed  Colonel,  vice  Lieutenant-General  James  Hay,  C.B., 
deceased. 

Before  embarking  for  active  service  new  colours  were  supplied  to 
the  regiment  at  Portsmouth,  and  were  formally  delivered  over  on 
parade  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  Elliot  on  the  21st  of  April,  but  the 
ceremony  usually  observed  on  such  occasions  was  in  this  instance 
dispensed  with  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  Elliot,  who  unfurled  and 
delivered  the  colours  without  comment  on  the  private  parade  ground 
of  the  regiment  in  the  Cambridge  barracks. 

The  79th  having  been  completed  to  its  numerical  strength,  and  all 
necessary  arrangements  made  to  proceed  on  active  service,  it  em- 
barked at  Portsmouth,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel 
E.  J.  Elliot,  in  Her  Majesty's  ship  Simoom,  on  the  4th  of  May,  and  after 
a  most  prosperous  voyage  arrived  at  Scutari  on  the  20th.  On  the 
following  day  the  regiment  disembarked  and  encamped  on  the  plain 


104  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

of  Scutari,  near  the  Turkish  barracks,  where  it  was  brigaded  with  the 
93rd  Highlanders,  under  the  command  of  Brigadier-General  Sir  Colin 
Campbell. 

On  the  embarkation  of  the  regiment  for  Turkey  two  companies 
were  left  at  Portsmouth  as  a  depot,  which  very  soon  afterwards  joined 
the  depot  battalion  stationed  at  Winchester. 

On  the  1st  of  June  the  whole  army  then  at  Scutari  had  the  honour 
of  being  reviewed  by  the  Sultan  Abdul  Medjid,  with  the  Grand  Vizier 
and  several  other  Turkish  Ministers  of  State,  the  English  and  Foreign 
Ambassadors  to  the  Porte,  Marshal  St.  Arnaud,  the  French  Com- 
mander-in-Chief,  and  a  very  numerous  staff,  when  His  Majesty  the 
Sultan  was  pleased  to  express  himself  to  Lord  Raglan  in  terms  of  the 
highest  approbation  regarding  the  appearance  and  equipment  of  the 
troops. 

On  the  7th  of  June  the  arrival  of  the  42nd  Royal  Highlanders  in 
the  Hydaspes  completed  the  Highland  brigade,  which — with  the  brigade 
of  Guards  under  General  Bentinck — formed  the  1st  division  of  the 
eastern  army,  which  was  commanded  by  H.R.H.  the  Duke  of 
Cambridge. 

On  the  13th  of  June  the  1st  division  embarked  at  Scutari  for 
Varna,  the  79th  embarking  on  the  steamer  Cambria,  the  42nd  on  the 
Hydaspes,  and  the  93rd  on  the  Melbourne. 

On  the  14th  the  division  arrived  in  Varna  Bay,  and  on  the  15th  the 
Highland  brigade  disembarked  in  the  boats  of  H.M.S.  London, 
Bellerophon,  Arethusa,  and  Sidon,  and  encamped  on  a  magnificent 
plain  overlooking  Lake  Devno,  situated  a  mile  south  of  Varna,  on 
ground  just  vacated  by  the  light  division,  which  had  moved  to  Aladyn. 

The  regiment  here  received  a  great  acquisition  in  the  person  of 
Dr.  Richard  James  Mackenzie,  a  gentleman  of  the  highest  professional 
acquirements,  who — resigning  a  lucrative  practice  in  Edinburgh — with 
true  professional  zeal,  embarked  for  Turkey,  provided  with  an  intro- 
ductory letter  from  the  Earl  of  Aberdeen  to  Lord  Raglan.  Returning 
from  visiting  the  Turkish  hospitals  on  the  banks  of  the  Danube,  Dr. 
Mackenzie  was  offered  by  his  lordship  the  temporary  rank  and  pay  of  an 
army  surgeon,  which  he  accepted,  and  at  his  own  request  he  was  at- 
tached to  the  79th,  Dr.  Scot,  the  surgeon,  being  an  early  college  friend. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  105 

On  the  1st  of  July  the  division  marched  from  the  camp  at  Varna 
and  moved  to  Aladyn,  where  it  again  encamped  on  ground  recently 
vacated  by  the  light  division,  which  had  proceeded  seven  miles  further 
to  the  village  of  Devno. 

On  the  6th  of  July  the  division  was  reviewed  by  His  Excellency 
Omar  Pasha,  the  Turkish  commander-in-chief,  who  expressed  himself 
highly  pleased  with  the  appearance  and  discipline  of  the  troops. 

The  division  remained  encamped  at  Aladyn  till  the  28th,  when, 
owing  to  the  prevalence  of  fever  and  the  appearance  of  Asiatic 
cholera,  it  was  removed  to  a  new  encampment  at  a  distance  of  six 
miles,  on  an  elevated  table  land  near  the  village  of  Givrakla,  in  close 
proximity  to  a  large  forest. 

Whilst  stationed  at  Givrakla  the  regiment  had  the  misfortune  to 
lose  its  two  senior  field  officers,  Lieutenant-Colonel  E.  J.  Elliot,  who 
commanded  the  regiment,  and  Brevet  Lieutenant-Colonel  James 
Ferguson,  both  of  whom  died  of  fever. 

Colonel  the  Honourable  Landerdale  Maule,  assistant-adjutant- 
general  to  the  2nd  division,  who  for  many  years  commanded  the 
regiment,  also  died  about  the  same  time.  These  three  deaths,  which 
occurred  within  a  few  days  of  each  other,  caused  deep  feelings  of 
regret  in  the  regiment. 

On  the  13th  of  August  Major  John  Douglas  was  promoted  to  the 
lieutenant-colonelcy  of  the  regiment,  in  succession  to  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  E.  J.  Elliot,  deceased. 

The  division  remained  in  this  encampment  until  the  20th  of  August 
following,  during  which  time  the  men  were  employed  in  making 
gabions  and  fascines  and  throwing  up  entrenchments. 

On  the  16th  of  August  the  Guards  and  42nd  Highlanders  moved 
from  Givrakla  to  Varna,  and  on  the  22nd  the  79th  and  93rd  followed 
them.  On  the  23rd  the  regiment  encamped  at  Galata  Bornou,  on  the 
western  side  of  the  Bay  of  Varna,  four  miles  from  the  town. 

On  the  29th  of  August  the  division  embarked  for  the  invasion  of 
the  Crimea,  the  79th,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel  Douglas,  on  board 
the  sailing  transport  Dunbar,  the  42nd  in  the  Emu,  and  the  93rd  in 
H.M.S.  Terrible. 

Other  portions  of  the  army  continued  to  embark  until  the  4th  of 


10G  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

September,  when  the  whole  fleet  of  transports  and  men-of-war 
rendezvoused  at  Baltschik  Bay,  where  it  formed  a  junction  with  the 
French  army  under  Marshal  St."Arnaud  and  the  Turkish  contingent 
under  Suleiman  Pasha.  On  the  7th  the  combined  expeditionary 
army  of  the  allies  sailed  from  Baltschik  Bay,  each  steam-vessel  taking 
two  sailing  transports  in  tow,  and  arrived  at  Kalamita  Bay,  on  the 
coast  of  the  Crimea,  on  the  13th. 

On  the  14th  of  September  at  daybreak,  orders  were  issued  to 
prepare  for  landing,  which  was  effected  during  the  day  without 
opposition.  At  2  p.m.  the  1st  division  had  completed  its  disembark- 
ation, and  at  4  o'clock  it  marched  four  miles  inland  from  the  place  of 
landing,  and  bivouacked  for  the  night  near  to  Lake  Touzla.  On  the 
following  day  a  portion  of  the  tents  were  landed,  and  the  time  from 
this  date  until  the  18th  was  occupied  in  disembarking  cavalry,  artillery, 
and  stores  from  the  fleet,  and  in  making  preparations  for  an  advance. 
On  that  day  the  tents  were  struck  and  shipped  on  board  the  Orinoco, 
as  it  was  found  impracticable  lo  convey  them  with  the  army  for  want 
of  transport.  Consequently  the  troops  bivouacked  on  the  night  of 
the  18th,  and  at  midnight  orders  were  issued  to  march  at  6  o'clock  on 
the  following  morning.  Accordingly  the  troops  were  under  arms  at 
the  appointed  hour,  but,  from  some  delay  in  embarking  the  sick,  the 
army  did  not  start  until  8  a.m.,  when  it  proceeded  on  its  march  across 
immense  plains  in  the  direction  of  Sebastopol.  The  order  of  march 
was  in  double  columns  of  companies  from  the  centre  of  divisions  at 
half  or  sub-division  distance,  the  front  and  left  flank  being  covered  by 
skirmishers  of  the  2nd  battalion  Rifle  brigade,  the  8th  and  llth 
Hussars,  13th  Light  Dragoons,  and  the  17th  Lancers.  This  order  of 
march  was  adopted  in  order  that,  by  wheeling  suddenly  to  the  right  or 
left,  a  line  of  four-deep  could  at  once  be  formed  to  either  flank.  The 
artillery  formed  by  divisions  and  marched  on  the  right  of  the  infantry. 
The  Turks  were  nearest  to  the  sea,  with  their  right  flank  protected  by 
the  men-of-war,  which  steamed  along  parallel  to  the  army ;  the  French 
were  in  the  centre,  and  the  British  furthest  away  from  the  sea  on  the 
left. 

After  several  halts  to  allow  the  stragglers  to  re-join,  at  half-past  three 
o'clock   the   army  arrived   at   the   Bulganak   River,  a   small  stream 


79lH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  107 

intersecting  the  road  to  Sebastopol,  traversed  by  a  bridge  which  was 
found  to  be  in  good  repair.  As  the  column  approached  the  bridge  a 
distant  cannonade  was  heard,  and  the  galloping  of  horse  artillery  to 
the  front  indicated  that  the  enemy  was  in  view. 

Upon  arriving  at  the  crest  of  some  rising  ground  about  a  mile 
beyond  the  river,  the  brigades  of  the  1st  Division  formed  line,  and 
were  ordered  to  lie  down.  The  horse  artillery  were  in  advance  of  the 
infantry,  and  the  cavalry  were  posted  in  some  hollow  ground  still 
further  to  the  front.  The  glistening  of  sabres  and  bayonets  reflected 
in  the  sunshine  now  brought  to  view  a  dark  mass  of  the  enemy, 
which  was  drawn  up  upon  some  high  ground  about  a  mile  in  advance, 
with  a  battery  of  artillery  in  position  on  its  left. 

Fire  was  now  opened  between  the  English  artillery  and  that  of  the 
enemy,  and  was  maintained  for  upwards  of  half-an-hour,  when  a  strong 
column  of  French  infantry  advanced  in  order  to  turn  his  left  flank, 
upon  which  he  withdrew  in  perfect  order. 

The  brigades  then  withdrew  over  the  summit  of  the  ridge  nearer  to 
the  Bulganak,  and,  piling  arms,  prepared  to  bivouac  for  the  night. 
Strong  picquets  were  thrown  out  in  front,  and,  as  it  was  now  six 
o'clock,  watering  parties  were  ordered,  and  the  troops  prepared  to 
refresh  themselves  with  tea  and  biscuit,  it  being  found  impossible  to 
cook  the  ration  meat,  the  only  fuel  procurable  being  weeds,  as  not  a 
bush  was  visible  along  the  whole  line  of  march.  Thirteen  miles  of 
ground  had  been  traversed,  and  the  army  was  now  within  five  miles  of 
the  strong  position  which  the  Russians  had  taken  up  upon  the  river 
Alma. 

At  dawn  on  the  20th  the  army  got  under  arms,  and  at  6  a.m.  it  was 
announced  to  the  troops  that  the  position  occupied  by  the  enemy  was 
to  be  attacked.  The  sick  being  embarked  on  board  the  fleet  at  8  a.m., 
the  army  advanced  in  two  columns,  having  the  2nd  division  on  the 
right  (communicating  with  the  French  left),  supported  by  the  3rd ; 
the  light  division  on  the  left,  supported  by  the  1st ;  with  the  4th 
division  in  reserve.  The  advance  was  covered  by  the  2nd  battalion 
Rifle  Brigade  in  extended  order,  and  the  left  flank  by  the  cavalry  and 
reserve  artillery. 

After  several  halts  to  enable  the  staff  to  reconnoitre  the  enemy's 


108  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

position,  the  army  came  within  full  view  of  the  enemy,  occupying  a 
ridge  of  heights  on  the  left  bank  of  the  Alma,  completely  commanding 
the  road  to  Sebastopol  and  disputing  the  passage  of  the  river. 

The  right  bank  of  the  Alma  was  now  approached  by  the  village  of 
Burliuk,  which  is  intersected  by  a  road  passing  to  a  ford  at  the  river, 
flanked  by  vineyards  to  the  right  and  left,  and  edged  by  trees  and 
brushwood.  Opposite  to  the  ford,  a  rugged  and  winding  mountain 
road  ascends  to  the  crest  of  the  hill,  with  ravines  diverging  to  the  right 
and  left ;  and  below  the  village  a  good  bridge  was  left  standing, 
connecting  the  Sebastopol  road.  On  the  plateau  near  the  summit 
of  the  ridge,  and  nearly  opposite  to  the  bridge,  a  very  powerful  redoubt 
was  occupied  by  the  enemy  in  force,  and  to  the  right  and  left  of  this 
there  were  two  others  on  commanding  points,  the  spaces  connecting 
all  three  being  filled  by  columns  of  infantry.  At  half-past  one  p.m. 
the  action  commenced  by  the  redoubt  on  the  enemy's  left  opening  fire 
on  the  French  columns,  which  were  destined  to  attack  and  turn  his 
left  flank ;  the  other  two  redoubts — the  attack  upon  which  was  assigned 
to  the  British  army — opening  fire  as  the  troops  came  within  range. 
The  fire  was  returned  with  spirit  by  the  field  batteries,  which  were  in 
position  close  to  the  stone  wall  of  the  vineyard,  but  with  little  effect 
on  the  heavily  armed  redoubt ;  however,  from  the  accuracy  of  the 
artillery  practice,  the  round  shot  and  shell  directed  against  the  enemy's 
infantry,  dropped  right  into  his  columns,  causing  much  disorder  and 
inflicting  severe  loss.  The  village  of  Burliuk  was  all  this  time  in 
flames,  having  been  fired  by  the  enemy  on  the  approach  of  the 
British  ;  and  the  skirmishers  of  the  Rifle  Brigade,  rushing  through  the 
burning  village,  and  entering  the  vineyard  beyond,  spread  themselves 
along  the  margin  of  the  river,  and  engaged  the  Russian  riflemen  on 
the  opposite  side  of  the  bank. 

The  several  divisions  now  formed  line,  and  the  light  and  2nd 
proceeded  to  the  attack,  whilst  the  1st  division  advanced  close  to  the 
vineyard  wall  and  was  ordered  to  lie  down  under  a  heavy  cannonade 
for  a  quarter-of-an-hour,  when  it  received  orders  to  advance  in  support 
of  the  light  division.  The  1st  division,  clearing  the  stone  wall  at  a 
bound,  entered  and  traversed  the  vineyards  ;  and,  fording  the  river, 
crossed  to  the  opposite  bank. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  109 

Sir  Colin  Campbell,  with  much  judgment,  availed  himself  of  the 
overhanging  brow  of  an  abrupt  rising  ground  to  the  right  of  the 
mountain  pass,  by  which  the  Highland  brigade  was  directed  to  ascend, 
and  forming  the  troops  in  quarter  distance  column,  advanced  in  this 
formation,  thereby  gaining  ground  for  a  considerable  distance  under 
cover,  and  avoiding  one  of  the  most  conspicuous  points  on  which  the 
guns  of  the  enemy  were  trained.  On  reaching  the  slope  of  the  hill, 
the  three  regiments  rapidly  formed  in  echelon  lines,  and  in  admirable 
and  imposing  array  advanced  to  the  attack.  On  the  right  the  42nd 
Royal  Highlanders  preserved  the  communication  with  the  brigade  of 
Guards,  in  the  centre  were  the  93rd  Sutherland  Highlanders,  and  the 
79th  formed  the  extreme  left  of  the  whole  allied  line.  The  magnificent 
mile  of  line  displayed  by  the  Guards  and  Highlanders,  the  prominent 
bearskins,  the  undulating  waves  of  the  clan  tartans,  the  stalwart  frames 
and  the  steady  and  confident  bearing  of  those  young  and  eager  soldiers 
can  never  be  forgotten  by  those  who  witnessed  the  scene,  whilst  it 
contributed  materially  to  the  discouragement  of  the  enemy,  whose 
columns  perceptibly  wavered  as  the  line  approached.  To  waver  is  to 
be  defeated,  and  the  enemy's  masses  of  four-and-twenty  deep  absolutely 
reeled  and  staggered  to  and  fro  under  the  murderous  fire  of  the 
Scottish  line,  which  was  delivered  with  great  effect  at  a  distance  of 
200  yards. 

Kinglake,  in  his  Invasion  of  the  Crimea^  thus  describes  the  advance 
of  the  79th  :— 

"  Above  the  crest  or  swell  of  ground  on  the  left  rear  of  the  93rd, 
yet  another  array  of  the  tall,  bending  plumes  began  to  rise  up  in  a 
long,  ceaseless  line,  stretching  far  into  the  east,  and  presently,  with  all 
the  grace  and  beauty  that  marks  a  Highland  regiment  when  it  springs 
up  the  side  of  a  hill,  the  79th  came  bounding  forward.  Without  a 
halt,  or  with  only  the  halt  that  was  needed  for  dressing  the  ranks,  it 
sprang  at  the  flank  of  the  right  Sousdal  column,  and  caught  it  in  its 
sin — caught  it  daring  to  march  across  the  front  of  a  battalion 
advancing  in  line !  Wrapped  in  the  fire  thus  poured  upon  its  flank, 
the  hapless  column  could  not  march,  could  not  live.  It  broke,  and 
began  to  fall  back  in  great  confusion ;  and  the  left  Sousdal  column 


110  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

being  almost  at  the  same  time  overthrown  by  the  93rd,  and  the  two 
columns  which  had  engaged  the  '  Black  Watch '  being  now  in  full 
retreat,  the  spurs  of  the  hill  and  the  winding  dale  beyond  became 
thronged  with  the  enemy's  disordered  masses.  A  cheer  now  burst 
from  the  Highlanders,  and  the  hill-sides  were  made  to  resound  with 
that  joyous  assuring  cry,  which  is  the  natural  utterance  of  a  northern 
people  as  long  as  it  is  warlike  and  free." 

In  fifteen  minutes  the  centre  or  great  redoubt  was  stormed  and 
captured  by  the  troops  of  the  light  division,  and  the  enemy  simul- 
taneously abandoned  the  one  on  his  right,  which  was  occupied  by 
two  companies  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  commanded  by  Major 
Clephane,  the  guns  being  withdrawn  by  the  enemy.  The  French 
troops  had  now  succeeded  in  turning  the  enemy's  left,  and  he 
retired  in  confusion  from  all  parts  of  his  position.  The  allied 
line  then  advanced,  and  the  horse  artillery  galloping  up  the  ravine 
opened  fire  upon  his  columns,  which  were  in  full  retreat  down  the 
opposite  side  of  the  ridge,  which  was  crowned  on  all  parts  by  the 
British  infantry.  At  5  p.m.  all  firing  ceased,  when  the  army  moved 
forward  and  occupied  a  second  chain  of  hills  in  advance  of  the  first, 
leaving  the  ground  recently  covered  by  the  enemy  considerably  in  rear, 
and  the  troops  proceeded  to  form  their  bivouac. 

The  loss  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders  in  the  battle  of  the  Alma  was 
2  rank  and  file  killed  and  7  rank  and  file  wounded.  The  distinction 
of  a  Companionship  of  the  Bath  was  conferred  upon  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  John  Douglas,  who  commanded  the  regiment  ;  Captain 
Andrew  Hunt  was  promoted  by  brevet  to  be  Major  in  the  army,  and 
the  79th  subsequently  received,  with  other  regiments,  the  royal 
authority  to  have  the  word  "Alma"  inscribed  on  its  colours  and 
appointments.  The  whole  of  the  21st  and  22nd  was  occupied  in  the 
interment  of  the  allied  and  Russian  dead,  and  in  conveying  the 
wounded  on  board  the  fleet.  At  7  a.m.  on  the  23rd  the  combined 
armies  again  advanced,  and  at  3  p.m.  arrived  at  the  Katscha  river  and 
villages,  both  of  which  were  found  deserted  by  the  inhabitants.  As 
both  the  bridges  had  been  left  entire,  the  British  army  crossed  by  them 
at  the  village  of  Eskel,  and  bivouacked  on  a  chain  of  hills  beyond 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  Ill 

the  river.  The  French  and  Turkish  armies  passed  by  the  lower 
bridge,  near  the  embouchure  of  the  river  with  the  sea,  and  bivouacked 
on  the  high  ground  to  the  British  right. 

At  7  a.m.  on  the  24th  the  army  marched  with  the  French  and 
Turkish  troops  on  the  right  flank,  but  were  halted  in  a  wide  plain 
until  nearly  noon,  when,  the  sick  being  embarked,  it  again  advanced, 
and  arrived  at  3  p.m.  at  the  Belbec  river  and  village ;  and,  crossing  by 
the  bridge  which  was  left  entire,  ascended  by  a  precipitous  and  wind- 
ing mountain  road  to  a  high  table  land,  where  it  bivouacked  a  mile 
beyond  the  river.  In  its  onward  march  to  Kalamita  Bay  the  army 
continued  to  suffer  from  Asiatic  cholera ;  and  it  is  with  deep  regret 
that  the  writer  has  to  record  the  loss  from  this  cause  of  Doctor  R.  J. 
Mackenzie,  who  died  on  the  heights  of  the  Belbec  at  8  a.m.  on  the 
25th,  sincerely  and  deeply  regretted  by  all  ranks  of  the  79th,  and  by  a 
wide  circle  of  private  friends,  who  were  much  attached  to  him  for  his 
personal  qualities  and  disinterested  motives  in  serving  with  the  army. 
The  victim  of  his  ardent  love  of  his  profession,  Doctor  Mackenzie 
followed  the  army  on  foot,  undergoing  much  fatigue  and  sharing  its 
every  privation.  So  highly  were  his  services  appreciated  by  the  79th, 
that  after  the  battle  of  Alma,  on  his  coming  up  to  the  regiment  from 
attendance  on  the  wounded,  several  of  the  men  called  out  "  Three 
cheers  for  Dr.  Mackenzie  ! "  which  was  promptly  and  warmly  responded 
to.  As  an  instance  of  the  important  services  rendered  to  the  army 
generally  by  Dr.  Mackenzie,  it  may  be  here  stated  that,  after  the  battle 
of  Alma,  he  performed  no  fewer  than  twenty-seven  capital  operations 
with  his  own  hands,  two  of  them  being  amputations  at  the  hip  joint. 
The  relatives  of  the  unfortunate  gentleman  will  be  pleased  to  learn,  that 
after  the  notification  of  peace  a  neat  tombstone,  with  an  appropriate 
inscription  and  fenced  in  by  a  stone  wall,  was  erected  to  his  memory  by 
the  regiment  on  the  heights  of  the  Belbec,  near  to  his  resting-place. 

The  army  prepared  to  move  at  7  a  m.  on  the  25th,  but  counter- 
orders  were  issued,  and  it  remained  inactive  until  1 1  in  the  forenoon, 
when  it  proceeded  on  its  march,  in  columns  of  divisions,  through  a 
dense  forest  of  underwood,  which  harassed  the  men  and  greatly  im- 
peded the  march  of  the  troops.  The  order  of  the  previous  day's 
march  was  reversed,  the  French  and  Turkish  troops  being  on  the 


112  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

British  left — whilst  the  artillery,  cavalry,  and  commissariat  covered  the 
only  road  which  led  through  the  wood.  Precisely  at  noon  Sebastopol 
came  in  view,  distant  about  three  miles  directly  in  front,  when  the 
line  of  march  was  suddenly  changed  to  almost  due  south-east,  leaving 
Sebastopol  to  the  right  and  rear.  The  army  continued  to  struggle 
onwards  under  a  fierce  sunshine,  and  at  4  p.m.  the  1st  division,  fol- 
lowing the  route  of  the  light  division,  debouched  from  the  wood  upon 
the  highway  from  Simpheropol  to  Sebastopol,  at  a  spot  marked  in  the 
map  as  "  Mackenzie's  Farm."  At  an  angle  in  the  road  were  numerous 
carriages,  a  few  prisoners,  and  two  ammunition  waggons,  captured  by 
the  cavalry  advance  guard  from  the  rear  of  a  Russian  division  half- 
an-hour  previously.  Proceeding  on  the  march  down  a  very  precipi- 
tous mountain  road,  a  most  magnificent  and  extensive  plain  came  in 
view,  surrounded  by  very  high  mountains,  intersected  by  numerous 
ravines,  and  covered  with  dwarf  trees  and  brushwood.  Numerous 
traces  of  the  late  brush  with  the  enemy,  in  the  shape  of  clothing, 
bridles,  and  saddlery,  with  broken  carriages  and  their  contents,  were 
strewed  along  the  road,  encumbering  the  march ;  and  at  nightfall  the 
division  crossing  the  Tchernaya  by  the  Traktir  bridge,  about  8  o'clock 
arrived  at  its  bivouac  on  a  high  hill  overlooking  the  valley  it  had  just 
left. 

At  7  a.m.  on  the  26th  the  march  was  resumed,  the  various  divisions 
descending  to  the  high  road,  and  advancing  in  columns  of  sections  of 
companies  till  they  crossed  the  Woronzoff  road  and  entered  the  plain  of 
Balaclava,  where  they  formed  in  columns  of  divisions  and  advanced, 
preceded  by  the  Rifle  Brigade  in  extended  order.  About  noon  the 
column  halted  in  the  plain,  while  the  skirmishers  of  the  Rifle  Brigade 
ascended  the  steep  acclivities  on  both  sides  of  the  harbour,  and  a 
troop  of  Horse  Artillery  entered  Balaclava  by  the  lower  road.  At 
1  p.m.  the  sharp  crack  of  the  Minie  rifle,  with  the  fire  from  the 
Horse  Artillery  and  booming  of  guns  from  the  fleet  outside  the  har- 
bour, intimated  that  the  old  Genoese  fort,  held  by  the  enemy,  had 
been  attacked.  In  fifteen  minutes  it  surrendered,  when  the  fleet 
entered  the  harbour,  and  the  army  at  once  proceeded  to  form  its 
bivouac. 

A  base  of  operations  being  thus  secured,  the  army  proceeded  by 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  113 

divisions  and  encamped  together  with  the  French  troops  on  the  south 
side  of  Sebastopol,  as  it  had  been  resolved  to  proceed  with  the  siege 
of  that  important  fortress. 

On  the  1st  of  October  the  1st  division  marched  from  Balaclava 
and  encamped  on  the  right  of  the  light  division  before  Sebastopol,  to 
assist  in  the  duties  of  the  siege.  The  93rd  Highlanders  were  detached 
from  the  brigade,  and  encamped  on  a  rising  ground  to  the  right  of  the 
road  leading  from  the  valley  to  the  town  and  harbour  of  Balaclava, 
1,200  men  of  the  Royal  Marines  were  landed  from  the  fleet  and 
encamped  on  the  opposite  height,  numerous  batteries  were  erected, 
and  a  chain  of  redoubts  constructed  across  the  entrance  to  the  plain 
commanding  the  Woronzoff  road.  The  defence  of  these  redoubts 
was  entrusted  to  Turkish  artillery  and  infantry.  On  the  3rd  and  4th, 
tents  were  landed  and  distributed  to  the  army  in  sufficient  proportion 
to  afford  cover  to  the  troops,  and  all  necessary  preparations  for  the 
siege  proceeded  with  vigour. 

With  a  view  to  facilitating  the  recruiting  of  Scotchmen  for  the 
Highland  regiments  serving  in  the  Crimea,  the  Highland  depots 
attached  to  the  battalion  at  Winchester,  were,  in  the  month  of  Sep- 
tember, removed  to  several  stations  in  Scotland.  The  79th  depot, 
under  the  command  of  Captain  T.  B.  Butt,  proceeded  by  railway  from 
Winchester  to  London,  and  again  by  rail  from  London  to  Aberdeen, 
where  it  occupied  barracks. 

On  the  8th  of  October  Sir  Colin  Campbell  was  appointed  to  the 
important  command  of  the  troops  and  position  of  Balaclava,  and  was 
succeeded  in  command  of  the  Highland  brigade  by  Colonel  D.  A. 
Cameron  of  the  42nd,  as  colonel  on  the  staff,  and  subsequently  as 
major-general  with  local  rank. 

Early  in  this  month  Lieutenant  F.  A.  Grant  died  of  cholera  before 
Sebastopol. 

On  the  9th  the  army  again  broke  ground  before  Sebastopol,  when 
the  79th  and  other  regiments  of  the  division  furnished  strong  covering 
and  working  parties  to  guard  the  trenches  and  batteries. 

On  the  17th  the  English  and  French  batteries  opened  fire  upon  the 
Russian  defences,  and  the  regiment  furnished,  along  with  others,  ten 
volunteers,  and  the  brigade  one  subaltern  officer,  to  act  as  sharp- 

l 


114  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

shooters  in  picking  off  the  enemy's  gunners  and  engaging  his  riflemen. 
Lieutenant  Edward  William  Cuming  of  the  79th  was  the  volunteer 
officer  from  the  brigade,  and  he  rendered  good  service  in  the 
performance  of  this  very  important  duty. 

At  7  a.m.  on  the  25th  the  report  of  guns  from  the  plain  of 
Balaclava,  followed  by  the  galloping  of  numerous  staff  officers,  and 
the  order  for  the  1st  division  to  "  fall  in,"  apprised  the  army  that  an 
attack  was  meditated  in  the  direction  of  Balaclava.  The  1st,  and 
afterwards  the  4th  divisions,  with  their  field  batteries  under  the 
command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir  George  Cathcart,  moved  rapidly 
to  the  scene  of  the  attack,  witnessing  the  events  of  the  battle  as  they 
proceeded  to  the  valley  by  the  heights  along  the  rear  of  the  French 
position. 

From  a  hill  on  the  left  bank  of  the  Tchernaya,  a  heavy  battery  of 
the  enemy's  guns  was  playing  upon  the  Turkish  redoubts  at  the  head 
of  the  valley,  from  which  the  fire  was  returned  with  spirit  at  a  distance 
of  three-quarters  of  a  mile.  Heavy  columns  of  Russian  infantry, 
with  a  numerous  artillery,  emerging  from  the  defile  of  Tchorgoum, 
crossed  the  low  ground  and  advanced  in  beautiful  order,  preceded  by 
a  cloud  of  skirmishers,  towards  the  Woronzoff  road,  covered  by  the 
fire  of  their  artillery,  which  slackened  as  they  approached  the  road. 
Before,  however,  the  sharp-shooters  had  neared  the  redoubts,  the 
Turks  abandoned  them  and  fled  across  the  plain  towards  Balaclava, 
the  recreant  Moslems  in  their  rapid  flight  rushing  through  the  93rd 
Highlanders,  who  were  formed  in  line  on  a  rising  ground  in  front  of 
the  village  of  Kadikoi,  with  the  Jnvalid  battalion  commanded  by 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Daveney  on  their  left.  Suddenly  from  six  to 
eight  squadrons  of  Russian  cavalry  dashed  up  the  slope,  crossed 
the  road,  and  galloping  through  the  plain,  sabred  many  of  the  fugitive 
Turks.  Onward  they  swept  in  the  direction  of  the  93rd,  which 
opened  fire  in  line  at  a  distance  of  400  yards,  when  they  wheeled 
about,  and,  galloping  off,  disappeared  in  the  gorge  of  a  chain  of  hills 
in  the  direction  of  the  village  of  Kamara. 

The  repulse  of  this  attack  upon  the  93rd  was  followed  by  the 
splendid  charge  of  the  British  heavy  cavalry  brigade,  commanded  by 
General  Scarlett,  upon  another  formidable  body  of  the  Russian 


79TH   CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  115 

cavalry.  It  was  a  fearful  shock,  but  the  combat  was  short  and 
decisive,  and  in  seven  minutes  the  enemy  broke  and  retired  across 
the  plain  in  great  disorder,  leaving  numbers  of  killed  and  wounded 
on  the  ground,  60  prisoners,  and  40  horses. 

The  1st  division  now  arrived  on  the  battle-field,  and  soon 
afterwards  the  4th  division  and  a  brigade  of  French  infantry.  They 
immediately  formed  in  two  lines  in  order  of  battle,  while  the  light 
cavalry  brigade,  under  the  Earl  of  Cardigan,  took  post  rather  in 
advance  of  the  left  of  the  line  of  infantry.  The  guns  of  the  4th 
division  now  opened  fire  on  the  captured  redoubts,  which  the  enemy 
soon  abandoned  ;  and  Liprandi,  declining  the  proffered  battle,  with- 
drew his  infantry  in  the  direction  of  Kamara.  The  light  cavalry 
brigade  was  then  ordered  to  advance  and  endeavour  to  prevent  the 
Russians  from  carrying  off  the  guns  taken  from  the  Turks,  but,  from 
some  fatal  mistake,  it  was  led  at  a  gallop  along  the  valley,  swept  by 
the  Russian  guns,  to  the  left  of  the  ridge  of  hills  occupied  by  the 
Turkish  redoubts,  and  was  directed  against  a  Russian  battery  at  the 
extreme  end  of  the  valley.  The  brigade  rushed  on  under  a 
murderous  fire  from  all  arms,  and  actually  rode  through  the  spaces 
between  the  guns,  sabring  the  enemy's  artillerymen ;  but,  alas  !  the 
triumph  was  short-lived,  and  the  splendid  light  brigade  now  found 
itself  exposed  to  a  front  and  flank  fire  of  musketry,  to  a  cross  fire 
from  several  masked  batteries,  and  to  an  attack  in  flank  by  a  large 
force  of  the  enemy's  cavalry.  In  fifteen  minutes  after  reaching  the 
enemy's  guns,  it  was  obliged  to  retire,  after  suffering  a  loss  of  more 
than  half  its  numbers  in  men  and  horses. 

The  infantry  divisions  now  piled  arms  in  the  plain  to  await  events ; 
and,  as  Liprandi  evinced  no  disposition  to  renew  the  combat,  the 
4th  division  and  the  brigade  of  Guards  of  the  1st  division  were 
withdrawn  at  nightfall  to  their  encampment  before  Sebastopol.  The 
42nd  and  79th  were  moved  to  a  new  position  on  the  heights  on  the 
north  side  of  the  valley  of  Balaclava,  communicating  with  the  Royal 
Marines,  the  93rd  occupying  their  former  encampment  on  the  left  of 
the  road  leading  into  the  town  and  harbour,  whilst  three  Turkish 
battalions  were  posted  at  intervals  to  complete  the  communication  at 
various  points.  Preparations  to  throw  up  a  strong  line  of  entrench- 


116  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

ments  along  the  heights  above  Balaclava  were  immediately  commenced, 
and  several  batteries  of  heavy  guns  were  erected  by  the  Royal  Marine 
artillery. 

At  6  a.m.  on  the  5th  of  November,  the  enemy  having  ascended 
by  several  ravines  leading  to  the  heights  opposite  Inkerman,  under 
cover  of  a  dense  fog,  attacked  the  right  of  the  English  line  before 
Sebastopol  in  overwhelming  force,  covered  by  a  powerful  artillery, 
which  he  had  placed  unperceived  in  position  during  the  previous 
night,  whilst  a  sortie  was  directed  against  the  left  flank  of  the  allies  to 
divert  the  French  troops  from  reinforcing  the  English  right.  A 
feigned  attack  was  simultaneously  made  upon  .the  rear  of  the  French 
position  by  the  valley  of  Balaclava,  the  troops  occupied  in  its  defence 
being  menaced  by  a  complete  division  of  cavalry  and  infantry,  with 
two  batteries  of  artillery  drawn  up  in  column  on  the  left  bank  of  the 
Tchernaya,  and  a  squadron  of  Cossack  cavalry  was  thrown  out  from 
this  division  in  extended  order  to  nearly  within  musket  shot  of  the 
line  of  entrenchments. 

After  a  bloody  and  obstinately  contested  action  of  six  hours' 
duration,  the  division  of  General  Bosquet  arrived  to  the  support  of 
the  British,  and  the  battle  of  "  Inkerman  "  terminated  in  a  repulse 
of  the  enemy  with  heavy  losses  and  the  withdrawal  of  his  forces 
within  the  walls  of  Sebastopol. 

1855. 

The  Highland  brigade,  in  conjunction  with  the  Royal  Marines  and 
Turkish  infantry,  and  latterly  with  600  Zouaves  in  support,  continued 
encamped  on  the  heights  of  Balaclava  until  the  21st  of  May,  1855. 

Although  the  Highland  brigade  was  thus  at  an  early  period  of  the 
campaign  unavoidably  withdrawn  from  the  siege  operations  before 
Sebastopol,  it  had  all  important  duties  to  perform  besides  those 
inseparable  from  the  unremitting  vigilance  imperatively  called  for  in 
the  defence  of  the  base  of  operations  of  the  army.  In  the  month  of 
December,  1854,  and  January  and  February,  1855,  all  the  available 
duty  men  of  the  Highland  brigade  were  usually  employed  at  daylight 
every  morning  in  the  severe  fatigue  of  conveying  to  the  army  before 
Sebastopol  round  shot,  shell,  and  provisions,  the  load  assigned  to  each 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  117 

man  being  generally  a  32-lb.  shot,  carried  in  a  sack,  or  56  Ibs.  of  biscuit. 
The  preparation  of  gabions  and  fascines  for  the  works  of  the  siege, 
numerous  public  fatigue  duties  in  the  harbour  of  Balaclava  and  else- 
where, as  well  as  the  labour  required  for  strengthening  the  entrench- 
ments, likewise  devolved  upon  the  brigade. 

In  the  month  of  January,  1855,  the  arrival  of  numerous  vessels 
from  England  freighted  with  wooden  huts  for  the  army  enabled  the 
Cameron  Highlanders  to  proceed  with  their  erection,  and  on  the  10th 
of  January  the  first  hut  was  finished  and  occupied  by  the  sick.  Others 
were  completed  in  succession,  and  on  the  28th  of  February  the 
regiment  was  fully  hutted. 

On  the  20th  of  February  the  brigade,  one  wing  of  the  2nd  battalion 
Rifle  Brigade,  the  71st  Highlanders,  and  the  Royal  Marines  were 
employed  in  a  reconnaissance  of  the  position  and  force  of  the  enemy 
near  Tchorgoum.  The  troops  were  ordered  to  fall  in  at  midnight, 
but  the  weather,  which  had  been  fine  for  the  previous  week,  suddenly 
changed,  rain  falling  in  torrents  as  midnight  approached.  The 
movement  was  therefore  deferred  till  2  a.m.  on  the  21st,  at  which 
hour  the  rain  was  succeeded  by  a  drifting  snowstorm,  accompanied 
with  a  piercing  north-east  wind,  which  blew  right  in  the  faces  of  the 
men,  and  the  morning  being  intensely  dark,  objects  were  scarcely  visible 
at  the  distance  of  a  few  yards.  Notwithstanding  these  unfavourable 
circumstances,  and  the  non-appearance  of  General  Vinoy's  French 
brigade,  which  was  to  have  co-operated,  Sir  Colin  Campbell  moved 
the  troops  into  the  plain  and  advanced  cautiously,  preceded  by  the 
71st  in  extended  order,  until  close  upon  the  Tchernaya,  where  day- 
break found  them  benumbed  with  cold  and  blinded  by  snowdrift,  at 
the  same  time  that  the  French  troops  were  perceived  coming  up  in 
support.  The  delay  enabled  the  enemy's  picquets  to  give  the  alarm, 
and  the  intended  surprise  proving  a  failure,  the  troops  returned  to 
their  encampment  at  10  a.m.  utterly  exhausted,  and  in  numerous 
instances  frost-bitten  in  the  ears  and  tips  of  the  fingers. 

In  the  months  of  January,  February,  March,  and  April,  sickness 
prevailed  in  the  regiment  to  a  great  extent,  appearing  principally  in 
the  shape  of  low  fever  and  dysentery,  arising — in  the  first  instance — 
from  privation  and  exposure,  subsequently  aggravated  by  the  moist 


118  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF    THE 

nature  of  the  ground  on  which  the  huts  were  erected,  small  springs 
oozing  to  the  surface  underneath  the  flooring,  generating  fungi  and 
grasses.  At  length  the  sick  list  became  so  numerous  that  it  was 
decided  to  vacate  the  huts,  and  encamp  the  regiment  under  canvas 
about  300  yards  higher  up  the  slope,  at  the  foot  of  the  Marine  heights, 
on  a  beautiful  plateau,  having  a  south-western  aspect,  and  pervaded 
in  all  parts  by  the  sea  breezes.  As  soon  as  this  change  was  effected  a 
remarkable  decrease  occurred  in  the  sick  list,  and  fever  ceased  to 
develop  itself. 

On  the  22nd  of  May  an  expedition,  commanded  by  Lieutenant- 
General  Sir  George  Brown,  G.C.B.,  consisting  of  the  Highland  Bri- 
gade, the  71st  Highlanders,  800  men  of  the  Royal  Marines,  with 
artillery  and  Land  Transport,  together  with  the  French  division  of 
Lieutenant-General  D'Autemarre,  and  a  division  of  Turkish  infantry, 
embarked  at  Balaclava  and  Kamiesch  for  the  purpose  of  capturing 
Kertch  and  Yenikale,  and  of  acting  in  concert  with  a  fleet  of  gunboats, 
intercepting  the  enemy's  communications  by  the  sea  of  Azof.  The 
79th  embarked  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  John 
Douglas,  in  H.M.S.  Furious,  which,  with  other  vessels  of  the  expedition, 
arrived  off  Ambalaki  bay,  six  miles  from  Kertch,  at  2  p.m.  on  the  24th. 
The  troops  landed  without  opposition,  and  inarching  for  three  miles 
ascended  a  ridge  of  hills,  and  bivouacked  for  the  night. 

As  the  troops  were  disembarking,  a  succession  of  explosions, 
occurring  at  intervals,  informed  the  expedition  that  the  enemy  had 
blown  up  his  magazines. 

At  sunrise  on  the  25th  the  troops  advanced  towards  Kertch,  where 
they  halted  until  guards  were  established  and  several  government 
buildings  set  on  fire.  The  Russian  troops  had  previously  evacuated 
and  fired  their  barracks  on  the  approach  of  the  expedition.  The 
column  then  proceeded  on  its  march  to  Yenikale  at  the  entrance  to 
the  sea  of  Azof,  where — no  resistance  being  offered — the  town  was 
taken  possession  of  by  the  allied  forces  at  4  p.m.,  and  the  troops 
proceeded  to  bivouac  on  high  ground  in  its  immediate  vicinity. 

On  the  20th  the  tents  were  landed,  and  strong  working  parties  were 
immediately  employed,  under  the  able  superintendence  of  Colonel 
Gordon,  R.E.,  in  throwing  up  entrenchments  and  constructing  redoubts 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  119 

at  various  points  for  the  defence  of  the  position  of  Yenikale.  On  the 
29th  the  79th  was  detached  to  occupy  the  Quarantine  barracks,  four 
miles  equidistant  from  Kertch  and  Yenikale,  in  order  to  keep  open 
the  communications  between  these  two  stations.  The  barracks  thus 
occupied  were  situated  close  to  the  water's  edge,  on  the  east  side  of 
the  bay  of  Kertch,  having  a  fine  pier  for  small  craft,  and  vast  piles  of 
buildings,  consisting  of  hospitals,  store-houses,  stabling,  &c.,  in 
excellent  condition.  The  outer  wall  was  loopholed  for  musketry  and 
a  breastwork  erected  exterior  to  the  main  gate  by  Lieutenant  Anderson, 
R.E.,  and  a  party  of  sappers. 

The  regiment  continued  in  undisturbed  possession  of  the  Quarantine 
barracks  until  the  12th  of  June,  when  it  received  orders  to  burn  the 
barracks  and  other  buildings  and  embark  for  Balaclava.  It  accordingly 
proceeded  in  boats  from  the  Quarantine  station  to  the  bay  of  Kertch, 
where  it  embarked  on  board  the  Colombo,  the  last  company  previous 
to  pushing  off  having  fired  the  various  buildings,  which  soon  blazed 
fiercely,  sending  forth  vast  columns  of  smoke  across  the  bay  as  long 
as  the  Colombo  remained  in  sight. 

At  4  p.m.  the  fleet  of  transports  sailed,  having  the  whole  of  the 
British  expeditionary  force  on  board,  excepting  the  71st  Highlanders, 
who  were  left,  with  some  French  troops  and  a  large  force  of  Turkish 
artillery  and  infantry,  to  defend  the  entrenched  position  of  Yenikale 
and  Pavlovskaya.  On  the  14th  the  Colombo  anchored  off  Balaclava, 
and  the  regiment,  landing  on  the  15th,  marched  to  its  old  encampment 
for  the  night ;  but  the  position  of  Balaclava  and  the  line  of  the 
Tchernaya  being  now  held  by  the  Sardinian  army,  the  Highland 
Brigade  marched  the  following  day  and  joined  their  old  companions 
in  arms,  the  brigade  of  Guards  before  Sebastopol  again  re-uniting  the 
division,  the  command  of  which  was  assumed  by  Major-General  Sir 
Colin  Campbell. 

The  79th  with  its  division  was  hereafter  employed  in  the  siege 
operations  before  Sebastopol.  During  the  assault  of  the  advanced 
works,  styled  respectively  the  Malakoff  and  the  Redan,  by  the  French 
and  English  troops  simultaneously  on  the  18th  of  June,  the  division 
was  drawn  up  in  reserve  in  advance  of  Picquet  House  Hill,  ready  to 
act  as  circumstances  might  require ;  but  upon  the  failure  of  both 


120  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

attacks  its  services  were  not  called  for,  and  it  returned  to  its  encamp- 
ment at  4  p.m.  having  been  sixteen  hours  under  arms. 

On  the  28th  of  June  Lord  Raglan,  the  commander-in-chief  of  the 
British  army,  expired,  universally  and  deeply  regretted,  and  was 
succeeded  in  command  by  Lieutenant-General  Sir  James  Simpson, 
the  chief  of  staff. 

The  formation  of  an  additional  division  to  the  army  having  been 
determined  on  in  consequence  of  the  accession  of  several  regiments 
as  reinforcements,  on  the  16th  of  August  the  9th,  13th,  31st,  and  56th 
regiments  of  the  line  were  incorporated  with  the  brigade  of  Guards 
into  the  1st  division,  commanded  by  Major-General  Lord  Rokeby; 
the  1st  and  2nd  battalions  of  the  Royals,  and  the  72nd  Highlanders, 
joining  the  2nd  brigade,  who  were,  together  with  the  old  Highland 
brigade,  now  designated  the  Highland  division,  and  continued  under 
command  of  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Colin  Campbell. 

The  79th  continued  to  share  in  the  operations  of  the  siege  of 
Sebastopol.  On  the  16th  of  August  the  enemy  attacked  the  French 
and  Sardinian  positions  on  the  Tchernaya  in  great  force,  but  were 
repulsed  at  all  points  with  severe  loss.  On  the  24th  of  August 
information  was  received  from  spies  by  General  Simpson  to  the  effect 
that  the  enemy  meditated  a  renewal  of  the  attack  on  the  French  and 
Sardinian  positions.  The  1st  brigade  of  the  Highland  division,  and 
the  72nd  Highlanders  from  the  2nd  brigade,  were  therefore  ordered 
as  a  reinforcement  to  proceed  to  the  vicinity  of  Kamara  and  await 
orders.  At  1  a.m.  on  the  25th  it  accordingly  marched  from  its 
encampment  before  Sebastopol,  and  arrived  before  dawn  at  the 
appointed  locality ;  but,  the  anticipated  attack  not  being  realised,  it 
was  withdrawn,  when  it  received  orders  to  proceed  on  the  following 
morning  and  occupy  the  position  it  had  previously  left.  The  brigade 
therefore  marched  at  dawn  on  the  26th  with  tents  and  baggage,  and 
encamped  on  a  beautiful  slope  beyond  the  village  of  Kamara  in  close 
proximity  to  the  Sardinian  head-quarters. 

The  brigade  continued  encamped  at  Kamara  until  arrangements 
were  made  for  a  second  assault  on  the  exterior  defences  of  Sebastopol. 
At  7  a.m.  on  the  8th  of  September  it  marched  to  take  part  in  the 
assault,  crossed  the  valley  of  Balaclava,  ascended  by  the  Karanyi  road, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  121 

and  reached  the  Guards'  encampment  at  10.30  a.m.,  where  the  men 
were  relieved  of  their  knapsacks  and  feather-bonnets,  which  were 
piled   by  companies   and   delivered   in   charge  to   a   guard   of   the 
71st  Highlanders.     The  brigade  resuming  its   march  at   11.30  a.m. 
entered    the    first   parallel   by   the    middle   or   French   ravine,    and 
gradually  moving  onward  by  the  approaches  under  a  tremendous  fire, 
at  4  p.m.  reached  the  fifth  or  most  advanced  parallel  fronting  the 
great  redan,  where  it  was  disposed  of   in  the  following  order :    the 
79th  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  R.  C.  H.  Taylor  on 
the  right,  with  the  72nd  on  its  left,  both  in  line  in  the  fifth  parallel. 
The   42nd  and  93rd  in  the  same  order  in  the  fourth  parallel,  the 
42nd  supporting  the  79th  and  the   93rd  the   72nd.     The  works  of 
the  redan  had  by  this  time  been  stormed  by  details  from  the  light 
and  2nd  divisions,  the  officers  and  men  of  which,  after  exhibiting 
a   devotion  and   courage  not  to  be  surpassed,    were   compelled   to 
retire  with  severe  loss,  whilst  the  simultaneous  attack,  executed  by 
the  French  troops  against  the  works  of  the  Malakoff,  was  crowned 
with  success. 

The  brigade  continued  to  occupy  the  advanced  trenches  under  a 
heavy  fire  throughout  the  remainder  of  the  day,  and  at  9  p.m.  it 
was  intimated  to  officers  commanding  regiments  that  it  was  to  assault 
the  redan  at  dawn  on  the  following  morning.  At  10  p.m.  the 
enemy's  fire  slackened,  and  only  a  dropping  fire  of  musketry 
succeeded  until  midnight,  when  it  ceased  altogether.  From  11 
p.m.  until  1  a.m.  on  the  9th,  a  succession  of  explosions  occurred 
within  the  city,  and  by  2  a.m.  Sebastopol  was  one  vast  sheet  of 
flame  and  smoke,  rendering  objects  distinctly  visible  in  the  town  and 
harbour.  At  about  5  a.m.  it  was  accurately  ascertained  that  the 
enemy  had  abandoned  all  his  works  and  was  in  full  retreat  across 
the  harbour  by  a  bridge  of  boats.  At  6  a.m.  two  companies  of 
the  79th,  under  Captain  Hodgson,  took  possession  of  the  redan 
and  its  works,  and  at  8  a.m.  the  Highland  brigade  was  relieved 
by  several  regiments  of  the  4th  division,  when  it  returned  to  its 
encampment,  which  it  reached  at  3  p.m.,  having  been  thirty-three 
hours  under  arms. 

The  loss  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders  on  the  day  of  the  assault 


122  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

and  in  the  various  operations  during  the  siege,  was  17  rank  and  file 
killed ;  Lieutenant  D.  H.  McBarnet,  Assistant-Surgeon  Edward  Louis 
Lundy,  3  sergeants,  1  drummer,  and  39  rank  and  file  wounded.  For 
its  services  during  the  siege  the  distinction  of  a  Companionship  of 
the  Bath  was  conferred  upon  the  junior  Lieutenant-Colonel,  R.  C.  H. 
Taylor  ;  Majors  R.  D.  Clephane  and  McCall  were  promoted  by  brevet 
to  be  lieutenant-colonels  in  the  army ;  Captains  W.  C.  Hodgson  and 
H.  W.  Campbell  were  promoted  to  the  brevet  rank  of  major ;  and  it 
received,  in  conjunction  with  other  regiments  engaged,  the  royal 
authority  to  have  the  word  "  Sebastopol "  inscribed  on  its  colours  and 
appointments. 

The  division  remained  under  canvas  until  the  17th  of  November, 
when  the  79th,  with  the  other  regiments  of  the  1st  brigade,  struck 
tents  and  occupied  wooden  huts  erected  on  new  ground  contiguous 
to  the  old  encampment  at  Kamara. 

1856. 

The  regiment  continued  to  occupy  its  hutted  encampment  at 
Kamara,  organising  its  camp  equipment  and  preparing  for  the 
anticipated  campaign  when  the  season  for  active  operations  again 
commenced  ;  but  on  the  2nd  of  April  the  signature  of  the  treaty  of 
peace  with  Russia  was  announced  to  the  army  by  a  salute  of  100  guns, 
and  a  friendly  interchange  of  civilities  was  established  between  the 
allied  and  Russian  armies. 

On  the  17th  of  April,  1856,  the  Highland  division  marched  from 
its  encampment  to  the  heights  before  Sebastopol,  where  the  English 
and  French  armies  were  reviewed  by  His  Excellency  General  Luders, 
the  Russian  commander-in-chief,  and  a  very  numerous  staff.  After 
the  review  it  marched  back  to  its  encampment,  which  it  reached  at 
9  p.m. 

On  the  8th  of  May  it  became  known  that  Sir  Colin  Campbell  was 
about  to  return  to  England,  and  at  9  a.m.  on  the  9th  the  old  Highland 
brigade,  consisting  of  the  42nd,  79th,  and  93rd  regiments,  was  formed 
up  in  three  sides  of  a  square  of  close  columns,  on  ground  contiguous 
to  the  encampment  at  Kamara,  when  General  Sir  Colin  Campbell, 
G.C.B.,  and  Major-General  D.  A.  Cameron,  C.B.,  with  their  respective 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  123 

staffs  rode  up,  and  Sir  Colin,  taking  off  his  hat,  delivered  the  following 
farewell  address  to  the  troops  : 

"  Soldiers  of  the  42nd,  79th,  and  93rd  !  old  Highland  brigade ; 
with  whom  I  passed  the  early  and  perilous  part  of  this  war,  I  have 
now  to  take  leave  of  you  ;  in  a  few  hours  I  shall  be  on  board  ship, 
never  to  see  you  again  as  a  body — a  long  farewell !  I  am  now  old,  and 
shall  not  be  called  to  serve  any  more,  and  nothing  will  remain  to  me 
but  the  memory  of  my  campaigns  and  of  the  enduring,  hardy, 
generous  soldiers  with  whom  I  have  been  associated,  whose  name  and 
glory  will  long  be  kept  alive  in  the  hearts  of  our  countrymen.  When 
you  go  home,  as  you  gradually  fulfil  your  term  of  service,  each  to  his 
family  and  his  cottage,  and  you  tell  the  story  of  your  immortal 
advance  in  that  victorious  echelon  up  the  heights  of  Alma,  and  of  the 
old  brigadier  who  led  you  and  loved  you  so  well ;  your  children  and 
your  children's  children  will  repeat  the  tale  to  other  generations,  when 
only  a  few  lines  of  history  will  remain  to  record  the  discipline  and 
enthusiasm  which  have  borne  you  so  stoutly  to  the  end  of  this  war. 
Our  native  land  will  never  forget  the  name  of  the  Highland  brigade, 
and  in  some  future  war  the  nation  will  call  for  another  one  to  equal 
this  which  it  can  never  surpass. 

"  Though  I  shall  be  gone,  the  thought  of  you  will  go  with  me 
wherever  I  shall  be  and  cheer  my  old  age  with  a  glorious  recollection 
of  dangers  confronted  and  hardships  endured — a  pipe  will  never  sound 
near  me  without  carrying  me  back  to  those  bright  days  when  I  was  at 
your  head,  and  wore  the  bonnet  you  gained  for  me,  and  the  honour- 
able decorations  on  my  breast,  many  of  which  I  owe  to  your  conduct. 
Brave  soldiers  ;  kind  comrades  !  Farewell  !  " 

At  the  conclusion  a  spontaneous  cheer  burst  from  officers  and  men, 
which  was  continued  until  Sir  Colin,  much  affected,  withdrew, 
accompanied  by  Major-General  Cameron  and  their  respective  staffs, 
when  the  troops  returned  to  their  several  encampments. 

On  the  evening  of  the  9th  of  May  Sir  Colin  was  entertained  at  a 
farewell  dinner  given  in  his  honour  by  the  officers  of  the  Highland 
division, 


24 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


On  the  6th  of  June  the  division  paraded  and  marched  to  the  head- 
quarters of  the  general  commanding  at  the  camp  before  Sebastopol 
in  order  to  attend  the  ceremony  of  an  investiture  of  the  Order  of  the 
Bath,  held  by  General  Lord  Gough  as  the  representative  of  Her 
Majesty  the  Queen.  After  the  conclusion  of  the  ceremony  the  troops 
were  reviewed  by  Marshal  Pelissier,  the  French  commander-in-chief, 
and  Lord  Gough,  when  the  division  returned  to  its  encampment. 

In  terms  of  the  treaty  of  peace,  the  evacuation  of  the  Crimea  was 
now  rapidly  proceeded  with.  On  the  15th  of  June  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  embarked  at  Balaclava  on  board  the  steam-transport 
Victoria,  which  sailed  immediately.  After  touching  at  Malta  and 
Gibraltar,  the  vessel  arrived  in  safety  at  Spithead  on  the  3rd  of  July. 
On  the  5th,  at  4  a.m.,  the  regiment  disembarked  in  the  dockyard 
at  Portsmouth,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  John 
Douglas,  C.B.,  and  proceeded  immediately  by  rail  to  the  camp  at 
Aldershot. 

For  their  services  in  the  Crimea  every  officer,  non-commissioned 
officer,  and  man  of  the  regiment  engaged  received  the  Crimean  and 
Turkish  War  Medals ;  and,  in  addition  to  the  distinctions  already 
mentioned  the  following  decorations  were  conferred  on  members  of 
the  regiment  :— 

THE  LEGION  OF  HONOUR. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  McCall 
Brevet -Major  Hodgson 
Captain  H.  W.  Campbell 
Lieutenant  and  Adjutant  J.  Young 
Sergeant  W.  Davie 


THE   MEDJIDIE. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  John  Douglas,  C.B.  - 
Lieutenant-Colonel  R.  C.  H.  Taylor,  C.B. 
Captain  A.  C.  McBarnet 
Captain  E.  W.  Cuming 
Captain  H.  H.  Stevenson 
Lieutenant  J.  M.  Leith 
Lieutenant  W.  McGill    .... 
Surgeon  T.  Goldie-Scot 


4th  class 
5th  class 


79TH  CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS.  125 

SARDINIAN  MEDAL. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  J.  Douglas,  C.B. 
Lieutenant-Colonel  R.  C.  H.  Taylor,  C.B. 
Major  R  D.  Clephane 
Captain  H.  H.  Stevenson 
Qnarter-Mattca1  R-  Jameson 

FRENCH   WAR  MEDAL. 
(Elected   by    their    Comrades. ) 

Colour-Sergeant  James  Spencer 

Colour-Sergeant  Alexander  Goodbrand 

Sergeant  William  Gunn 

Sergeant  William  Davie 

Private  James  Wilkie 

Private  Robert  Bruce 

Private  James  Sloane 

MEDAL  FOR  DISTINGUISHED  CONDUCT  IN  THE  FIELD,  WITH 
ANNUITY  OR  GRATUITY. 

Sergeant-Major  Thomas  Bunyan  -  -    £20  annuity 

Qr.  -Master-Sergeant  Duncan  Mclntyre  £15  gratuity 

Lance-Sergeant  James  Smith       -  -    £10  ,, 

Lance-Sergeant  William  Thorn        -  £10  ,, 

Lance-Sergeant  Daniel  Baker      -  -    £10  ,, 

Sergeant  James  Johnston  £10  ,, 

Private  Alexander  Sandison  £5  ,, 

Private  George  Kirk  £5  ,, 

Private  Robert  Andrew  -      £5  ,, 

Private  Donald  Angus      ...  £5  , , 

Private  John  Morton     -        -        -  £5  ,, 

Private  Charles  Webb  £5  „ 

Private  Thomas  Gow     -        -        -  -      £5  ., 

Private  James  Douglas  £5  ,, 

Private  Robert  Buchanan              -  -      £5  ,, 

Private  James  Dow  -  £5  ,, 

A  monument  was  erected  in  the  Dean  Cemetery,  Edinburgh,  by 
the  regiment  to  the  memory  of  their  comrades  who  fell  in  the 
campaign.  The  monument  is  of  granite,  and  has  the  following 
inscription  upon  it ; — 


126  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

IN  MEMORY  OF 

COLONEL  THE  HONOURABLE  LANDERDALE  MAULE, 
LIEUT. -COLONEL  E.  J.  ELLIOT,  LIEUT. -COLONEL  JAMES  FERGUSON, 

CAPTAIN  ADAM  MAITLAND, 
LIEUTENANT  F.  A.  GRANT,  LIEUTENANT  F.  J.  HARRISON, 

DR.  R.  J.  MACKENZIE  ; 
ALSO  369  NON-COMMISSIONED  OFFICERS  AND  MEN 

OF   THE 

79TH  HIGHLANDERS, 

Who  died  in  Bulgaria  and  the  Crimea,  or  fell  in  action  during 
the  Campaign  of  1854-55 

On  the  8th  of  July  the  whole  of  the  troops  then  encamped  at 
Aldershot  had  the  honour  of  being  reviewed  by  Her  Majesty  the 
Queen,  their  Royal  Highnesses  Prince  Albert  and  the  Duke  of 
Cambridge,  besides  numerous  other  persons  of  distinction.  At  the 
termination  of  the  review  Her  Majesty  addressed  a  selected  number 
of  officers,  non-commissioned  officers  and  men  from  each  of  the 
regiments  present  which  had  served  in  the  Crimea,  in  highly  com- 
plimentary terms,  thanking  them  for  the  devotion  and  gallantry  they 
had  displayed  in  her  service  and  their  country's  cause.  At  the 
conclusion  of  the  Royal  speech  Her  Majesty  was  loudly  cheered  by 
the  officers  and  men  she  addressed. 

On  the  10th  of  July  the  regiment  was  removed  by  railway  from  the 
camp  at  Aldershot  to  Dover  Castle,  in  order  to  join  the  division 
assembling  at  Shomcliffe  and  Dover  under  the  command  of  Major- 
General  Sir  H.  W.  Barnard,  K.C.B.  It  was  again  brigaded  with 
the  42nd  and  93rd  Highlanders,  under  the  command  of  its  former 
brigadier,  Major-General  D.  A.  Cameron,  C.B. 

On  the  30th  of  September  the  79th  was  removed  to  barracks  at 
Canterbury,  within  the  divisional  command,  in  consequence  of  the 
breaking  up  of  the  encampment  on  Dover  heights  rendering  a  new 
distribution  of  the  troops  necessary. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  127 

On  the  5th  of  December  the  regimental  depot  was  removed  from 
Aberdeen  to  Stirling  Castle,  where  it  joined  the  depot  battalion  formed 
there  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  E.  A.  G.  Muller. 

1857. 

On  the  28th  of  February  the  79th  was  called  upon  to  furnish  70 
volunteers  to  the  93rd  Sutherland  Highlanders. 

On  the  31st  of  March  the  regiment  marched  from  Canterbury  to 
the  camp  at  Shorncliffe,  where  it  joined  the  brigade  of  Lieutenant- 
General  Lord  West,  consisting  of  the  44th,  72nd,  and  98th  regiments, 
but  its  services  in  camp  were  of  brief  duration  for  on  the  23rd  of 
June  orders  of  readiness  for  its  removal  to  Dublin  were  received. 

On  the  25th  the  regiment  accordingly  proceeded  by  railway  from 
Shorncliffe  to  London,  where  it  was  temporarily  quartered  by  wings 
in  Portman  Street  and  St.  John's  Wood  barracks,  preparatory  to  its 
being  present  at  a  review  to  be  held  in  Hyde  Park  by  Her  Majesty 
the  Queen  for  the  inauguration  of  the  new  order  of  the  Victoria  Cross, 
and  for  the  purpose  of  presenting  the  same  to  several  officers  and  men 
of  the  Crimean  army. 

At  9  o'clock  on  the  morning  of  the  26th,  in  presence  of  an 
immense  assemblage  from  the  metropolis  and  surrounding  neighbour- 
hood, the  troops  were  formed  in  Hyde  Park  in  review  order.  They 
consisted  of  the  Household  Brigades  of  Cavalry  and  Infantry,  6th 
Dragoons,  llth  Hussars,  one  troop  of  Horse  Artillery  and  two  Field 
Batteries,  one  battalion  of  Royal  Marines,  79th  Highlanders,  2nd  bat- 
talion Rifle  Brigade,  one  company  Royal  Sappers  and  Miners,  and 
one  troop  of  Military  Train, — the  whole  representing  a  division  of 
10,000  men,  commanded  by  General  Sir  Colin  Campbell,  G.C.B. 
Precisely  at  10  o'clock  a  royal  salute  from  the  Field  Batteries  an- 
nounced the  approach  of  Her  Majesty,  who  arrived  on  horseback, 
accompanied  by  their  Royal  Highnesses  Prince  Albert  and  the  Duke 
of  Cambridge,  and  followed  by  a  brilliant  staff.  As  Her  Majesty 
advanced  towards  the  line  she  was  received  by  a  royal  salute,  and 
she  then  proceeded  to  distribute  the  much-coveted  decoration  of  the 
new  order,  in  which  she  was  assisted  by  the  Adjutant-General,  who 
called  out  the  rank,  name,  and  corps  of  each  recipient  in  succession, 


128  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

On  the  termination  of  the  ceremony  of  presentation  the  troops 
marched  past  in  slow  and  quick  time,  formed  line,  advanced,  halted, 
and  performed  the  royal  salute  by  presenting  arms,  which  closed  the 
proceedings  on  this  eventful  and  interesting  occasion. 

On  the  morning  of  the  27th  the  regiment  marched  from  Portman 
Street  and  St.  John's  Wood  barracks  to  the  Euston  Square  station, 
from  whence  it  proceeded  by  railway  to  Liverpool,  and  embarked  for 
Dublin  on  the  same  day.  On  the  28th  it  landed  at  Kingstown,  and 
was  quartered  in  the  Royal  barracks,  Dublin. 

The  alarming  intelligence  of  the  revolt  of  several  Sepoy  regiments, 
and  of  the  existence  of  disaffection  amongst  others,  now  reached  Her 
Majesty's  government,  and  reinforcements  of  European  troops  being 
urgently  called  for,  the  officer  commanding  the  79th  received  pressing 
orders  on  the  1st  of  July  to  make  immediate  preparations  for  the 
embarkation  of  the  regiment  for  India.  By  the  accession  of 
volunteers  from  several  line  regiments,  the  79th  was  completed  to 
1,000  rank  and  file,  and  on  the  25th  the  regiment  was  inspected  by 
General  Lord  Seaton,  commanding  the  forces  in  Ireland. 

On  the  31st  of  July,  being  within  a  month  of  the  receipt  of  the 
order,  the  head-quarters,  band,  grenadiers,  1st  and  2nd  companies, 
and  light  company  embarked  at  Kingstown,  under  the  command  of 
Lieutenant-Colonel  John  Douglas,  C.B.,  on  board  the  Walmer  Castle, 
and  sailed  the  following  day ;  the  left  wing,  consisting  of  the  3rd,  4th, 
5th,  6th,  and  7th  companies,  under  Major  Butt,  embarked  on  the  1st 
of  August  in  the  Louisiana  and  Tyburnia  transports,  and  both  vessels 
proceeded  to  sea  on  the  following  day.  The  men  were  in  the  highest 
spirits,  and  their  good  conduct,  and  the  rapid  and  exemplary  manner 
in  which  the  embarkation  was  conducted,  elicited  the  following 
garrison  order  from  the  General  Officer  commanding  the  Dublin 
division. 

"  Town  Major's  Office,  Dublin, 

"31st  July,  1857. 

"  The  Major-General  commanding  the  division  considers  it  only  due 
to  the  79th  Highlanders  to  express  his  satisfaction  at  the  very  soldier- 
like manner  in  which  the  head-quarters  of  the  regiment  marched  from 
the  barracks  and  effected  their  embarkation  at  Kingstown  this 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  129 

morning ;  and  he  trusts  this  notice  of  his  approbation  may  serve  as 
an  inducement  to  the  troops  generally,  under  similar  circumstances, 
to  effect  their  removals  in  a  like  creditable  manner. 

(Signed)  "  G.  MYLIUS, 

"  Town  Major." 

The  following  officers  embarked  with  the  regiment  : — 

Colonel  John  Douglas,  C.B. ;  Majors  T.  B.  Butt  and  Hodgson ; 
Captains  Maitland,  McBarnet,  Miller,  Stevenson,  Percival,  Turner, 
Currie,  Leith,  Scovell,  and  McDonald  ;  Lieutenants  Mackesy, 
Durant,  Allen,  McNair,  Crawford,  de  Carteret,  Cleather,  F.  Campbell, 
McMurdo,  Gawne,  Everett,  Neil  Campbell,  Alleyne,  Walker,  and 
Wimberley  ;  Ensigns  McGuire,  Stewart,  Dougal,  J.  Campbell,  Duff, 
Holford,  McCausland,  and  Kerr  ;  Paymaster  Cant ;  Adjutant  Young ; 
Quarter-Master  McGill ;  Surgeon  J.  Goldie  Scot ;  Assistant-Surgeons 
Drysdale,  Roberts,  and  Kilgour. 

The  detachments  on  board  the  Louisiana  and  Tyburnia,  under 
Majors  Butt  and  Hodgson  respectively,  arrived  after  a  prosperous 
voyage  at  Point  de  Galle,  Ceylon,  within  a  day  of  each  other,  and 
were  transhipped  there  to  H.M.S.  Simoom. 

The  Simoom  arrived  at  Calcutta  on  the  17th  of  November,  and  the 
six  companies  of  the  79th  disembarked  the  following  day,  being 
quartered  in  the  Town  Hall,  which  was  the  largest  building  in  the  city. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  R.  H.  C.  Taylor,  C.B.,  who  had  come  to  India 
by  the  overland  route,  now  assumed  command  of  the  six  companies. 

Seven  young  officers  of  the  H.E.I.C.  service  were  on  the  1st  of 
December  attached  for  duty  to  the  79th,  and  continued  to  serve  with 
the  regiment  until  the  termination  of  the  campaign. 

During  their  stay  in  the  Town  Hall  at  Calcutta  the  six  companies, 
under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  were  reviewed 
by  the  Governor- General  of  India,  the  steadiness  of  the  men  eliciting 
his  warmest  approbation.  They  were  on  this  occasion  brigaded  with 
the  42nd  Highlanders  and  the  Calcutta  Volunteers. 

After  a  voyage  of  90  days  the  Walmer  Castle ',  with  the  head- 
quarters of  the  regiment,  dropped  anchor  in  Madras  Roads  on  the 
1st  of  November,  1857  ;  here  the  first  intimation  of  the  frightful 

K 


130  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

atrocities  committed  by  the  revolted  Sepoys  at  Meerut,  Delhi, 
Cawnpore,  and  other  stations  in  the  Bengal  Presidency,  was  received 
by  the  regiment,  creating  a  thrill  of  horror  and  indignation,  and 
giving  rise  to  a  desire  for  vengeance  among  all  ranks.  Notwith- 
standing that  the  services  of  the  regiment  under  these  circumstances 
were  most  urgently  required  in  Bengal,  the  Walmer  Castle  was 
detained  at  Madras  until  the  3rd,  when — orders  being  received  to 
proceed  to  Calcutta — it  put  to  sea,  and  arrived  and  dropped  anchor 
there  on  the  27th  of  November,  1857. 

The  head-quarters  and  right  wing  disembarked  on  the  28th,  and 
occupied  barracks  in  Fort  William,  where  they  were  joined  by  the  left 
wing  from  the  Town  Hall. 

After  remaining  at  Fort  William  for  four  days  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  received  orders  to  proceed  by  rail  without  delay  to 
Raneegunge,  for  which  place  they  started  on  the  2nd  of  December, 
under  the  command  of  Colonel  John  Douglas,  C.B. ;  at  Raneegunge 
they  occupied  temporary  straw  huts  whilst  waiting  for  transport  to 
convey  them  to  the  front.  On  the  16th  of  the  same  month  the 
regiment  proceeded  by  detachments  to  Allahabad  by  bullock  train, 
and  all  were  assembled  there  again  by  the  25th. 

1858. 

On  the  4th  of  January,  1858,  Brigadier-General  Campbell,  com- 
manding at  Allahabad,  received  information  that  a  large  body  of  the 
mutineers  had  assembled  at  Munseala,  in  the  Secundra  district,  twelve 
miles  from  Allahabad. 

Immediate  orders  were  therefore  issued  for  the  79th,  some  Rifles, 
and  a  battery  of  Artillery  to  parade  at  midnight,  carrying  one  day's 
cooked  rations,  and  to  march  as  rapidly  as  possible  to  dislodge 
the  enemy. 

The  force  arrived  at  Secundragunge  at  daybreak,  where  the  enemy 
was  found  in  position  with  three  guns  on  the  opposite  side  of  a  ravine. 
The  attack  was  commenced  by  the  Grenadier  and  No.  1  companies, 
which  were  thrown  out  in  skirmishing  order.  The  defence  was  very 
feeble,  and  the  enemy  after  a  few  rounds  from  their  guns  abandoned 
them  and  took  to  flight,  being  pursued  by  the  regiment  from  village 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  131 

to  village.     Numbers  of  the  mutineers  were  cut  down  by  a  troop  of 
Horse  Artillery  acting  as  cavalry. 

At  the  village  of  Papahmow  a  halt  was  made,  as  it  was  ascertained 
that  the  rebels  had  dispersed  in  all  directions  and  that  further  pursuit 
was  useless. 

During  the  engagement  large  numbers  of  the  enemy  were  taken 
prisoners,  and  his  loss  in  killed  and  wounded  amounted  to  600. 

In  this  affair  the  79th  had  no  casualties. 

The  regiment  returned  to  Allahabad  the  same  day,  having  accom- 
plished a  remarkable  march  of  forty-eight  miles  in  twenty-three  hours. 
Much  praise  has  been  given  to  British  soldiers,  and  justly  so,  for  their 
power  of  marching  long  distances,  but  it  is  open  to  question  if  the 
same  amount  of  ground  was  ever  before  covered  by  a  regiment  in  such 
a  short  space  of  time. 

The  Governor-General  in  Council  was  pleased  to  express  in  general 
orders  his  approbation  of  the  conduct  of  Colonel  Douglas,  Colonel 
Taylor,  and  the  officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  men  of  the 
79th  on  this  occasion. 

On  the  21st  of  January,  1858,  the  regiment  proceeded  by  rail  to 
Mahazeepore,  50  miles  from  Allahabad,  where  the  railway  ended,  from 
whence  it  marched  by  wings  to  Futtehpore ;  the  right  wing  making  the 
journey  in  two  marches,  and  the  left  wing  in  one.  After  a  halt  of  two 
days  the  79th,  with  the  7th  Hussars  and  "E"  troop  R.H.A.,  marched 
towards  Cawnpore,  arriving  there  on  the  27th  of  January. 

On  the  4th  of  February  the  79th  crossed  the  Ganges  at  Cawnpore, 
and  marched  to  Bunnee,  on  the  5th  it  moved  on  to  Oonaoo,  and  on 
the  6th  to  Busseeretgunge.  From  that  date  until  the  llth  the  regiment 
was  employed  continuously  in  escorting  convoys  to  the  front,  and  on 
the  completion  of  this  duty  it  moved  to  Bunnee,  and  joined  the 
division  under  the  command  of  Brigadier-General  Sir  Hope  Grant. 
As  Colonel  Douglas,  C.B.,  was  now  appointed  to  the  command  of  a 
brigade,  the  command  of  the  79th  devolved  upon  Colonel  Taylor,  C.B. 

On  the  2nd  of  March  the  79th  moved  to  Camp  Bunterah,  near 
Lucknow,  where  it  joined  the  force  assembling  under  Sir  Colin 
Campbell  for  the  siege  of  that  city. 

The  defences  of  the  city  of  Lucknow  consisted  of  three  successive 


132  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

lines,  all  facing  east ;  the  first  running  along  the  canal,  supported  by 
a  strong  battery  at  the  Hazret  Gunge ;  the  second  from  the 
Imambara  on  the  right,  round  the  mess  house,  to  the  Moti  Mahul  on 
the  right  bank  of  the  Goomtee;  the  third  protected  the  Kaiserbagh. 
Still  further  to  the  west  the  Residency  formed  an  inner  line  of  defence 
for  the  mutineers.  The  southern  and  western  sides  of  the  city  were 
covered  by  impenetrable  masses  of  building,  which  rendered  them 
practically  unassailable,  but  the  enemy  had  apparently  neglected  the 
defences  on  the  northern  side,  which  was  skirted  by  the  river  Goomtee. 

Sir  Colin  Campbell  therefore  resolved  to  direct  a  front  attack  upon 
the  eastern  defences  with  a  portion  of  his  force,  whilst  the  remainder, 
crossing  the  Goomtee,  effected  a  turning  movement  on  the  northern 
side  of  the  city. 

On  the  2nd  of  March  a  portion  of  Sir  Colin's  force,  including  the 
42nd,  79th,  and  93rd  Highlanders,  marched  to  the  Dilkoosha,  just  out- 
side Lucknow,  and  commenced  to  erect  batteries  to  shell  the  enemy's 
first  line  of  defence  on  the  canal.  On  the  3rd  the  remainder  of 
the  force  closed  up  to  the  Dilkoosha,  and  Sir  Colin  took  up  a  position 
with  his  right  resting  on  the  Goomtee  at  the  village  of  Bibiapore, 
and  his  left  on  a  point  about  two  miles  beyond  the  Dilkoosha. 
On  the  4th  he  directed  that  two  pontoon  bridges  should  be  thrown 
across  the  Goomtee  at  Bibiapore  to  effect  his  flanking  movement 
on  the  opposite  bank.  These  bridges  were  completed  on  the  5th, 
and  the  same  night  the  3rd  division  (Lieutenant-General  Walpole's) 
and  some  cavalry,  the  whole  under  General  Sir  James  Outram, 
G.C.B.,  crossed  to  the  left  bank  of  the  river. 

The  3rd  division  comprised  the  5th  brigade,  consisting  of  the  23rd 
Fusiliers,  79th  Highlanders,  and  1st  Bengal  Fusiliers,  under  the 
command  of  Brigadier-General  Douglas,  C.B.,  of  the  79th,  and  the 
6th  Brigade,  consisting  of  the  2nd  and  3rd  battalions  of  the  Rifle 
brigade,  and  the  2nd  Punjaub  Infantry,  under  the  command  of 
Brigadier-General  Horsford. 

Sir  James  Outram's  orders  were  to  push  up  the  left  bank  of  the 
Goomtee  and  to  turn  and  render  untenable  the  enemy's  strong 
positions  on  the  right  bank,  thus  preparing  the  way  for  Sir  Colin's 
direct  attack  from  the  Dilkoosha. 


79lH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  133 

On  the  6th  Sir  James  Outram's  force  advanced,  and  the  2nd 
Dragoon  Guards  engaged  some  of  the  enemy's  cavalry.  The  79th, 
under  Lieutenant-Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  advanced  in  line  in  support  of 
the  Bays,  and  were  for  some  time  under  fire  of  the  enemy's  guns, 
having  Ensign  Thain  of  the  regiment  wounded. 

The  force  bivouacked  for  the  night  at  Chinhat,  throwing  out  strong 
picquets.  These  were  attacked  at  daylight  on  the  7th  by  the  enemy, 
who  brought  out  several  guns.  The  regiment  turned  out  immediately 
in  support  of  the  picquets,  and  advanced  in  line  for  about  a  mile,  but 
as  the  enemy  retired  again  into  Lucknow  it  returned  to  camp. 

On  the  8th  of  March  Outram  erected  several  batteries  to  fire  across 
the  river  and  shell  the  enemy  on  the  right  bank. 

On  the  9th,  Lieutenant-General  Walpole  drove  the  enemy  from  his 
position  on  the  left  bank,  and  occupied  a  building  called  the  Yellow 
House,  which  was  carried  at  the  point  of  the  bayonet  by  two  companies 
of  the  79th  and  Bengal  Fusiliers ;  then,  pressing  on  in  pursuit  of  the 
rebels,  he  seized  the  Badshahbagh,  which  enabled  him  to  place 
heavy  guns  in  position  to  enfilade  the  enemy's  works.  The  remaining 
eight  companies  of  the  79th  advanced  through  the  Badshahbagh  and 
occupied  the  chief  buildings  in  the  vicinity ;  the  Grenadiers  and  No.  1 
company  being  located  in  a  large  house  which  commanded  the  road 
leading  to  the  Iron  Bridge  by  which  the  city  of  Lucknow  is  entered. 

Outram,  having  now  occupied  the  left  bank  of  the  Goomtee  as  far 
as  the  Badshahbagh,  signalled  the  success  of  his  operations  to  Sir 
Colin  Campbell  at  the  Dilkoosha. 

On  the  morning  of  the  10th  the  rebels  made  a  most  determined 
attack  on  a  picquet  from  the  most  advanced  companies  of  the  79th, 
but  were  repulsed  with  considerable  loss,  being  unable  to  get  nearer 
than  50  yards.  They  then  withdrew  to  a  respectful  distance,  and  kept 
up  a  galling  fire  upon  the  picquet.  Brigadier-General  Douglas  there- 
fore gave  orders  that  they  should  be  cleared  out  at  the  point  of  the 
bayonet,  which  was  done  in  a  most  gallant  manner  by  the  Grenadiers 
and  No.  1  company  under  Captain  Stevenson  and  Lieutenant  M'Nair. 
In  this  brilliant  encounter  the  party  of  the  79th  had  Sergeant  W.  Davie 
and  Private  J.  Rankine  killed ;  Privates  J.  Miller  and  J.  Ritchie 
dangerously  wounded,  and  two  men  slightly  wounded. 


134  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   Of   THE 

Whilst  Outram  was  thus  engaged,  Sir  Colin  remained  quiet  at  the 
Dilkoosha;  but  on  the  9th  his  force  advanced  and  took  the  Martiniere, 
and  this  success  was  followed  up  later  in  the  day  by  the  capture  of 
the  Secundrabagh,  Shah  Nujeef,  and  Begum  Kothie. 

At  daybreak  on  the  llth  the  79th  advanced  and  cleared  the  enemy 
from  the  remaining  portions  of  the  suburbs  on  the  left  bank  of  the 
Goomtee,  seizing  the  buildings  in  the  vicinity  of  the  Iron  and  Stone 
Bridges.  On  the  same  day  Sir  James  Outram  opened  a  heavy  fire 
with  the  artillery  across  the  river  on  to  the  Kaiserbagh. 

On  the  evening  of  the  12th  it  was  resolved  to  seize  the  Iron  Bridge 
and  throw  a  breastwork  across  it,  from  which  the  fire  of  the  enemy 
could  be  kept  under.  Volunteers  to  construct  this  breastwork  were 
called  for,  and  Captain  Stevenson,  Lieutenant  Wimberley,  Sergeant 
Mackenzie,  and  10  men  were  selected.  At  midnight  the  party 
proceeded  carrying  with  them  gabions  and  sand  bags,  and  placed 
them  about  half  way  across  the  bridge  at  a  point  indicated  by 
Lieutenant  Wynne,  R.E.,  who  was  in  charge  of  the  party.  Sand  bags 
were  passed  rapidly  on  to  the  bridge,  and  the  breastwork  was  completed 
in  a  very  short  time.  A  party  of  the  Bengal  Fusiliers  then  rushed  up 
and  occupied  the  work,  opening  fire  upon  the  enemy  under  cover  of 
which  the  volunteers  withdrew.  This  little  affair  was  admirably  carried 
out  and  called  forth  the  praise  of  General  Outram  in  his  despatch. 

On  the  12th,  13th,  and  14th,  Outranks  force  kept  up  a  continuous 
fire  against  the  Kaiserbagh,  and  on  the  14th  it  was  carried  by  storm 
by  the  10th  regiment  and  Brasyer's  Sikhs.  During  these  days  the 
79th  was  posted  at  the  Yellow  House. 

On  the  16th  of  March  Sir  James  Outram,  with  the  23rd  Fusiliers, 
79th,  and  Bengal  Fusiliers,  re-crossed  the  Goomtee  by  a  bridge  of 
casks  near  the  Secundrabagh,  and  joined  the  Commander-in-Chief  in 
the  city  at  the  Kaiserbagh,  leaving  General  Walpole  with  the  remainder 
of  his  division  to  prosecute  the  attack  from  the  left  bank.  On  the 
same  day  Sir  James,  acting  under  Sir  Colin  Campbell's  orders,  left  the 
Kaiserbagh  and  stormed  the  Residency,  which  was  evacuated  in  great 
haste  by  the  mutineers. 

On  the  17th  of  March  Outram  continued  his  advance,  occupying 
the  Hussein  Mosque  and  Deolat  Khana  without  opposition,  whilst  the 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  135 

79th  captured  the  Great  Imambara.  Nine  carts,  full  of  powder,  were 
left  behind  by  the  enemy  in  a  courtyard  adjoining  the  latter  place,  and 
orders  were  given  for  its  destruction.  By  some  accident,  which  can 
never  now  be  explained,  the  powder  exploded,  killing  and  wounding  2 
officers  and  30  men  of  the  brigade  ;  amongst  the  killed  was  Sergeant 
James  Blythe  of  the  79th. 

On  this  occasion  Private  Kerr  of  the  regiment,  who  was  acting  as 
hospital  orderly,  was  honourably  mentioned  in  regimental  orders  by 
Colonel  Taylor  for  rendering  assistance  to  the  wounded  under  a 
heavy  fire. 

On  the  19th  the  79th,  23rd,  and  2nd  Punjaub  Infantry,  with  three 
companies  of  the  20th  regiment  moved  against  the  Musaghbagh,  which 
was  evacuated  as  they  approached,  whilst  the  light  company  of  the  79th, 
under  Lieutenant  Everett,  stormed  and  captured  the  house  of  Nawab 
Ali  Khan.  The  regiment  had  Lance-Corporal  James  Malcolm  and 
Privates  T.  Munro  and  J.  Harrison  killed  during  the  day's  operations. 
Four  of  the  enemy's  guns  and  the  colours  of  the  7th  Oude  Irregular 
Infantry  (which  are  still  in  the  possession  of  the  regiment)  fell  into 
the  hands  of  the  79th. 

All  resistance  in  the  city  was  over  by  the  22nd  of  March,  on  which 
day  Sir  Colin  Campbell  published  the  following  congratulatory  order 
to  the  troops  : — 

"  The  Commander-in-Chief  congratulates  the  army  on  the  reduction 
and  fall  of  Lucknow.  From  the  2nd  to  the  21st  of  March,  when  the 
last  body  of  the  rebels  was  expelled  from  the  town,  the  exertions  of  all 
ranks  have  been  without  intermission,  and  every  regiment  employed 
has  won  much  distinction.  The  attack  on  both  sides  of  the  river 
Goomtee  has  been  conducted  by  the  General  and  Commanding 
Officers  of  the  brigades  and  regiments  with  vigour  and  perseverance, 
the  consequence  being  the  great  result  which  has  been  achieved  with 
comparatively  moderate  loss.  His  Excellency  returns  his  warmest 
thanks  to  the  troops.  Every  man  who  has  been  employed  either  in 
the  old  garrison  of  Lucknow,  in  the  relieving  force,  or  at  the  siege 
which  has  now  been  terminated  may  rest  assured  that  he  has  deserved 
well  of  his  country." 


136  -    HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

During  the  siege  of  Lucknow  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had 
2  sergeants  and  5  rank  and  file  killed ;  Brevet-Major  Miller,  Ensign 
Thain,  1  sergeant,  and  20  rank  and  file  wounded.  For  its  conduct 
on  this  occasion  the  regiment  received  the  royal  authority  to  have  the 
word  "  Lucknow  "  inscribed  on  its  colours  and  appointments. 

Brigadier-General  Douglas,  C.B.,  Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  Captains 
Maitland  and  Stevenson,  and  Lieutenants  Walker  and  Everett  were 
mentioned  in  general  orders  for  conspicuous  conduct  during  the  siege. 

The  79th  occupied  the  Imambara  until  the  2nd  of  April,  when, 
leaving  behind  the  sick  and  wounded,  it  marched  to  the  Dilkoosha, 
where  it  was  once  again  brigaded  with  the  42nd  and  93rd  Highlanders, 
under  the  command  of  Brigadier-General  the  Honourable  Adrian 
Hope. 

On  the  7th  of  April  the  Cameron  Highlanders  with  the  9th 
Lancers,  2nd  Punjaub  Cavalry,  the  42nd  and  93rd  Highlanders,  the 
4th  Punjaub  Rifles,  and  some  Artillery,  forming  a  division  under  the 
command  of  Lieutenant-General  Walpole,  left  Lucknow  with  orders 
to  advance  up  the  left  bank  of  the  Ganges,  penetrate  into  Rohilcund, 
and  disperse  the  scattered  bodies  of  mutineers  there.  The  march 
was  uneventful  until  the  15th  of  April,  when  the  force  reached 
Roodemow,  close  to  the  fort  of  Rooyah,  which  was  occupied  by  the 
enemy  under  Nurput  Singh. 

On  the  morning  of  the  16th  an  attack  was  made  upon  the  fort,  but 
no  reconnaissance  had  been  made,  and  the  attack  was  delivered  against 
its  strongest  and  most  inaccessible  face. 

The  42nd,  93rd,  and  4th  Punjaub  Rifles  were  in  advance,  the  79th 
being  held  in  reserve.  Throughout  the  day  gallant  efforts  were  made 
to  gain  an  entrance  to  the  fort,  but  to  no  purpose,  and  at  sunset  the 
force,  after  losing  its  Brigadier-General,  Adrian  Hope,  and  many 
officers  and  men,  was  withdrawn,  and  bivouacked  about  a  mile  from 
the  fort. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  had  two  men  wounded,  one  of  whom 
died  of  his  wounds. 

During  the  night  the  enemy  evacuated  the  fort,  which  was  destroyed 
by  the  troops  on  the  17th. 

On  the  18th  the  division  marched  to  Bilgwan,  on  the   19th  to 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  137 

Sandhee,  on  the  20th  to  Mungoor,  on  the  21st  to  Kakladapore,  and 
on  the  22nd  it  arrived  at  Sirsa,  40  miles  from  Rooyah,  near  the 
village  of  Allygunge  which  was  occupied  by  the  rebels.  Their 
position  was  at  once  attacked,  and  they  were  driven  from  it  with  a  loss 
of  four  guns,  the  9th  Lancers  pursuing  them  for  six  miles. 

In  this  engagement  the  79th  had  no  casualties. 

On  the  27th  of  April  Sir  Colin  arrived  at  Allygunge  and  assumed 
command  of  the  force,  which  advanced  at  once  upon  Bareilly. 
Shahjehanpore  was  reached  on  the  30th  of  April,  and  on  the  3rd  of 
May  the  force  bivouacked  at  Fareedpore,  one  march  from  Bareilly. 
Early  on  the  morning  of  the  5th  of  May,  Sir  Colin,  with  the  Highland 
brigade,  General  Stisted's  brigade,  and  a  heavy  battery  of  Artillery, 
advanced  from  Fareedpore,  covered  by  the  2nd  Punjaub  Cavalry. 

The  enemy  was  found  strongly  posted  in  front  of  Bareilly  with  a 
stream  in  his  rear;  the  Highland  brigade  accordingly  advanced  in 
line,  supported  by  two  native  regiments,  the  artillery  and  cavalry  being 
on  the  flanks,  and  the  enemy  was  quickly  driven  from  his  position 
across  the  stream.  This  the  79th  crossed  by  a  bridge,  and  the 
regiment  advanced  for  about  three-quarters  of  a  mile  towards  the  town. 
A  halt  was  then  made  for  the  artillery  to  come  up,  as  the  suburbs  of 
Bareilly  were  full  of  the  enemy.  During  this  halt  Sir  Colin,  observing 
that  some  of  the  enemy  were  trying  to  turn  his  left  flank,  directed  one 
company  of  the  79th,  under  Captain  McBarnet,  to  occupy  a  wood  to 
the  left  front  and  to  hold  it  at  all  costs.  This  company  was  almost 
immediately  attacked  in  the  wood,  but  repulsed  and  drove  back  the 
enemy.  A  very  vigorous  charge  was  also  made  on  the  42nd  High- 
landers, who  bayoneted  the  whole  of  their  assailants. 

The  left  wing  of  the  79th,  the  42nd,  and  4th  Sikh  infantry  now 
advanced  towards  the  cantonments,  where  they  took  up  a  position  for 
the  remainder  of  the  day ;  the  right  wing,  with  the  93rd  Highlanders, 
was  directed  to  seize  the  suburbs  in  front,  the  enemy  evacuating  them 
and  retiring  out  of  range.  The  force  remained  under  arms  for  the 
remainder  of  the  day,  and,  as  evening  approached,  picquets  were 
thrown  out  and  the  troops  bivouacked  for  the  night. 

In  this  action  the  79th  had  Privates  John  Balmain  and  Alexander 
Thomson  killed,  and  two  men  wounded. 


138  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

His  Excellency  Sir  Colin  Campbell,  referring  to  the  conduct  of  the 
troops  during  the  progress  from  Lucknow  to  Bareilly,  thus  expresses 
himself  in  his  despatch  to  the  Governor-General  of  India  : — 

"  I  have  the  greatest  reason  to  be  satisfied  with  all  the  troops  under 
my  own  immediate  command.  Their  alacrity  to  meet  the  enemy  on  all 
occasions  is  of  course  what  your  Lordship  would  expect  from  them, 
but  I  must  not  lose  this  opportunity  of  bearing  testimony  to  the  con- 
stancy displayed  by  all  ranks  of  the  force  in  the  performance  of  their 
duties  during  the  great  and  incessant  heat  of  this  season  of  the  year. 
It  is  difficult  to  speak  too  highly  of  that  cheerful  endurance  of  intense 
fatigue  to  which  we  are  indebted  for  the  victories  gained  at  com- 
paratively trifling  loss  on  the  day  of  battle." 

Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  was  very  favourably  mentioned  in  general 
orders  for  his  conduct  in  the  action  of  Bareilly. 

News  now  reached  Sir  Colin  that  the  garrison  which  had  been  left 
behind  at  Shahjehanpore  was  being  assailed  by  a  large  body  of  Sepoys. 
He  accordingly  despatched  the  60th  Rifles,  79th  Highlanders,  and 
22nd  Punjaub  Native  Infantry,  under  the  command  of  Brigadier- 
General  Jones,  to  its  relief.  This  force  left  Bareilly  on  the  8th  of  May 
and  proceeded  by  forced  marches  to  Shahjehanpore,  where  it  arrived 
on  the  llth  at  daybreak,  when  it  was  found  that  the  fort  and  town 
were  both  in  the  enemy's  possession,  and  that  the  British  garrison  was 
holding  out  in  the  Gaol.  Swarms  of  the  enemy's  cavalry  at  once  came 
out  of  the  town,  and,  crossing  by  a  bridge  of  boats,  attempted  to  work 
round  the  right  flank  of  the  relieving  force,  but  a  few  well-directed 
shells  fired  by  the  artillery  stopped  the  movement  and  sent  them  back 
again.  After  a  halt  of  about  two  hours,  to  obtain  shelter  from  the 
scorching  mid-day  sun,  the  troops  again  advanced,  and  entering 
Shahjehanpore,  which  was  hastily  deserted  by  the  enemy,  opened 
communications  with  the  garrison.  The  79th  continued  its  march 
through  Shahjehanpore,  and  at  9  p.m.  halted  on  the  side  of  the  town 
facing  Mahomdie.  Picquets  were  thrown  out  in  front  for  the  night, 
and  the  regiment  breakfasted,  for  no  one  had  had  any  food  during 
the  day.  The  regiment  had  no  casualties  in  this  engagement,  but 
twenty-three  men  were  struck  down  by  sunstroke,  many  of  whom  died. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  139 

Tents  were  pitched  on  the  12th,  and  the  force  remained  inactive 
until  the  15th,  when  spies  brought  in  word  that  the  enemy  meditated 
an  attack.  The  troops  at  once  got  under  arms,  but  nothing  occurred 
till  noon,  when  two  bodies  of  the  enemy's  cavalry,  debouching  from  a 
wood,  charged  the  79th  and  two  guns  which  were  in  a  position  close 
to  the  regiment.  The  79th  at  once  formed  square  and  received  the 
enemy  with  volleys,  which  drove  him  back  with  considerable  loss. 
The  enemy  displayed  great  courage,  charging  right  up  to  the  muzzles 
of  the  two  guns,  and  the  artillerymen  were  fortunate  in  reaching  the 
79th  square  before  the  cavalry  were  upon  them. 

The  force  remained  in  position  all  day  and  bivouacked  for  the 
night,  returning  to  camp  the  next  morning,  when  it  was  ascertained 
that  the  enemy  had  retreated  to  Mahomdie. 

On  the  24th  of  May  the  79th  marched  to  Remi,  a  large  fort 
situated  half-way  to  Mahomdie,  which  was  in  the  hands  of  the  rebels. 
It  was  evacuated  as  the  regiment  approached.  On  the  following  day 
the  regiment  advanced  to  Mahomdie,  and  drove  the  enemy  from  the 
position  which  he  had  taken  up,  losing  two  rank  and  file  wounded. 
During  this  day's  march  the  regiment  suffered  terribly  from  the  heat, 
and  110  men  were  struck  down  by  the  sun,  several  of  whom  died  by 
the  road.  Ten  deaths  occurred  on  the  25th  of  May,  eight  on  the 
26th,  and  four  on  the  27th  ;  many  others  were  afterwards  invalided. 
The  indefatigable  exertions  of  Surgeon-Major  Goldie  Scot  in  at- 
tending to  the  sick  on  this  trying  occasion  were  beyond  all  praise. 
By  his  kindness  and  attention,  and  that  of  the  medical  officers  under 
him,  many  lives  were  saved. 

As  Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  had  been  appointed  to  the  command  of 
a  brigade,  the  command  of  the  regiment  at  Mahomdie  devolved  upon 
Major  Butt. 

As  the  relief  of  Shahjehanpore  and  the  capture  of  Mahomdie  had 
now  been  effected,  it  was  resolved  to  suspend  all  active  operations 
until  the  close  of  the  hot  season.  The  79th  therefore  returned  to 
Shahjehanpore,  arriving  there  on  the  29th  of  May.  On  the  30th 
Lieutenant  Robertson  and  22  men  joined  head-quarters  from  the 
depot  at  Stirling. 


140  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

On  the  3rd  of  June  the  regiment  marched  to  Futtehghur,  where  it 
went  into  summer  quarters,  occupying  the  fort  and  barracks. 

On  the  25th  of  June  one  company,  under  command  of  Major 
Maitland,  moved  from  Futtehghur  to  Maguls-Ki-Serai. 

On  the  16th  July  four  companies  marched  to  Cawnpore,  being 
followed  by  the  remainder  of  the  regiment  on  the  28th  of  the  same 
month. 

On  the  occasion  of  the  departure  of  the  regiment  from  Futtehghur, 
Brigadier-General  McCausland,  commanding  the  troops  at  that  station, 
issued  the  following  garrison  order  : — 

"  Brigadier-General  McCausland  cannot  permit  Her  Majesty's  79th 
Highlanders  to  leave  the  station  without  recording  the  high  opinion 
he  has  formed  of  the  regiment  for  its  steady  and  soldier-like  behaviour 
in  quarters,  and  he  requests  Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  commanding,  to 
accept  and  convey  to  the  officers  and  men  under  his  command  his 
thanks  for  their  uniform  good  conduct.  They  leave  the  station 
without  having  a  single  complaint  made  against  them  from  the  day 
they  entered  it." 

On  the  23rd  of  August  the  left  wing,  under  Major  Butt,  marched 
to  Allahabad. 

Whilst  at  Cawnpore  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  Brigadier- 
General  the  Honourable  Percy  Herbert,  C.B.,  who  expressed  his 
approval  of  the  discipline,  interior  economy,  and  soldier-like  appear- 
ance of  the  corps. 

On  the  18th  of  October  the  head-quarters,  with  the  remainder  of 
the  regiment,  moved  by  rail  from  Cawnpore  to  Allahabad,  where 
preparations  were  now  made  for  a  renewal  of  the  campaign. 

On  the  21st  of  October  the  79th  marched  to  Soraon,  and 
joined  the  field  force  assembling  in  Oude  under  Brigadier-General 
Weatherall,  C.B. 

On  the  1st  of  November  the  force  advanced  against  Rampore 
Kussia,  which  was  held  by  a  body  of  the  enemy  strongly  entrenched, 
arriving  there  on  the  3rd  of  the  month.  Four  companies  of  the  79th 
were  at  once  directed  to  storm  the  enemy's  position,  the  remainder  of 
the  regiment  following  in  support.  So  rapidly  did  the  storming  party 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  141 

move  to  the  attack  that  the  enemy  was  completely  surprised,  and  very 
small  loss  was  incurred  by  the  regiment,  viz  : — 2  rank  and  file  killed, 
and  1  sergeant  and  6  rank  and  file  wounded. 

For  its  conduct  in  the  attack  on  this  place  the  79th  was  specially 
complimented  in  general  orders  by  the  Commander-in-Chief. 

On  the  6th  of  November  the  force  marched  to  Ameetha,  which 
was  occupied  without  opposition.  Here  Sir  Hope  Grant  assumed 
command,  and,  as  Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  was  again  appointed  to  the 
command  of  a  brigade,  Major  Butt  took  over  command  of  the  79th. 

The  next  move  of  the  regiment  was  to  Fyzabad,  where  it  crossed 
the  Gogra,  capturing  the  enemy's  works  erected  on  the  banks.  The 
bed  of  this  river  contained  many  quicksands,  from  which  Major  Miller 
and  several  of  the  men  were  extricated  with  the  greatest  difficulty, 
and  which  presented  a  serious  obstacle  to  the  passage  of  the  artillery. 

From  the  banks  of  the  Gogra  the  force  advanced  to  Muchligan, 
where  it  had  another  skirmish  with  the  mutineers,  driving  them  into 
a  dense  jungle  where  pursuit  was  an  impossibility.  The  79th  halted 
on  the  outskirts  of  the  jungle,  where  they  destroyed  great  quantities 
of  the  enemy's  ammunition  and  equipment,  which  he  had  left 
behind  in  his  flight.  On  this  occasion  Private  Robert  Winning  of 
the  regiment  greatly  distinguished  himself.  Coming  alone  in  the 
jungle  upon  six  of  the  enemy,  he  shot  one  of  them  down  and 
bayoneted  two,  the  remainder  taking  to  flight. 

Continuing  its  march  the  79th  passed  through  Sultanpore,  and 
encamped  on  the  banks  of  the  Raptee  river.  The  passage  of  this 
river  was  effected  on  the  25th  December,  and  the  pursuit  of  the 
flying  mutineers  was  resumed. 

1859. 

On  the  3rd  of  January  the  regiment  was  present  in  the  engagement 
with  the  rebels  at  Bundwa  Kote,  when  27  guns  were  captured. 

The  troops  were  now  on  the  frontier  of  Nepaul  where  the  remainder 
of  the  rebels  found  refuge. 

This  terminated  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign,  and,  as  tranquillity 
was  restored  in  the  country,  the  field  force  was  broken  up,  and  the 
regiments  were  ordered  to  return  to  different  stations. 


142  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  accordingly  gave  up  his  brigade  and  resumed 
command  of  the  79th. 

On  the  22nd  of  January  the  regiment  arrived  at  Lucknow,  where  it 
was  met  at  the  station  by  Sir  Colin  Campbell. 

The  following  day  he  inspected  the  regiment,  congratulating  it  on 
its  gallantry  during  the  recent  campaign,  and  praising  its  dash  and 
bravery  at  the  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  intimating  futhermore 
that  the  regiment  would  now  be  sent  to  Mean  Meer  in  the  Punjaub. 
At  the  close  of  his  address  His  Excellency  was  greeted  with  hearty 
cheers  from  both  officers  and  men,  after  which  he  bade  good-bye  to 
the  regiment  with  evident  emotion. 

During  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
lost  158  non-commissioned  officers  and  men  from  disease  or  in  action. 

For  its  conduct  during  the  suppression  of  the  mutiny  the  regiment 
received  the  thanks  of  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  and  both  Houses 
of  Parliament.  Colonel  Douglas,  C.B.,  was  appointed  a  Knight 
Commander  of  the  Order  of  the  Bath ;  Major  Butt  was  promoted  by- 
brevet  to  the  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel ;  Captains  Maitland, 
McBarnet,  and  Miller  received  brevet  majorities,  and  every  officer, 
non-commissioned  officer,  and  man  was  granted  the  Indian  Mutiny 
medal. 

On  the  8th  of  April,  1859,  the  regiment  arrived  at  Mean  Meer,  and 
on  the  15th  of  the  same  month  Lieutenant-Colonel  Taylor,  C.B., 
proceeded  on  leave  to  Europe,  being  succeeded  in  command  by 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Butt. 

1860. 

On  the  16th  of  March,  1860,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Sir  John  Douglas, 
K.C.B.,  retired  upon  half  pay,  and  on  the  10th  of  May  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Taylor,  C.B.,  also  retired  from  the  regiment.  This  promoted 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Butt  and  Major  Hodgson  to  be  regimental 
lieutenant-colonels,  and  Brevet-Majors  Maitland  and  McBarnet  suc- 
ceeded to  the  vacant  majorities. 

On  the  1st  of  November,  1860,  a  detachment  of  100  rank  and  file, 
under  Captain  Harrison,  proceeded  to  Fort  Kangra,  where  it  remained 
until  the  21st  of  January,  1862, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  143 

On  the  5th  of  November,  1860,  the  right  wing,  287  of  all  ranks, 
under  the  command  of  Major  McBarnet,  proceeded  to  Umritzur. 

On  the  6th  of  December  the  79th  lost  its  first  officer  by  death  since 
its  arrival  in  India,  viz.,  Captain  Newport,  who  died  of  cholera  at 
Dum  Dum.  He  had  never  joined  the  regiment,  having  exchanged 
from  the  39th  only  a  short  time  before  his  death. 

1861. 

On  the  19th  of  January,  1861,  the  79th  left  Mean  Meer  for 
Ferozepore,  where  it  arrived  on  the  21st  of  the  same  month,  being 
joined  on  arrival  by  the  wing  from  Umritzur. 

On  the  19th  of  May  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson,  who  had 
succeeded  Lieutenant-Colonel  Butt  in  command  of  the  regiment, 
proceeded  to  Europe  on  leave  of  absence,  making  over  the  command 
temporarily  to  Major  Maitland. 

1862. 

On  the  13th  of  February  the  regiment  marched  from  Ferozepore  to 
Nowshera,  arriving  there  on  the  18th  of  March.  From  here  the 
regiment  furnished  a  detachment  of  three  companies  to  Fort  Attock 
on  the  Indus. 

On  the  13th  of  March  General  W.  H.  Sewell,  C.B.,  colonel  of  the 
regiment,  died  in  England,  and  the  79th  passed  into  the  hands  of 
General  the  Honourable  Hugh  Arbuthnott,  C.B. 

The  79th  remained  at  Nowshera  until  the  23rd  of  November,  1862, 
when  it  was  joined  by  the  three  companies  from  Fort  Attock  and 
moved  to  Peshawur,  where  it  arrived  on  the  24th  of  the  same  month. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson,  having  re-joined  from  leave  of 
absence,  again  assumed  command  of  the  regiment  on  the  20th  of 
December. 

1863. 

Whilst  at  Peshawur  the  79th  had  the  misfortune  to  lose  two  of 
its  officers — Lieutenants  Dougal  and  Jones.  They  had  volunteered 
their  services  and  were  permitted  to  proceed  with  the  expedition 
against  the  Sitana  fanatics,  under  the  command  of  Brigadier-General 


144  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Sir  N.  Chamberlain,  K.C.B.  ;  the  former  was  killed  when  on  picquet 
on  the  6th  of  November,  1863,  the  latter  in  action  on  the  18th 
of  the  same  month.  They  were  both  doing  duty  with  the  71st 
Highlanders. 

During  the  month  of  December,  1863,  four  companies  of  the  79th, 
under  Major  Miller,  were  moved  from  Peshawur  to  the  Shubkudder 
Pass,  at  the  entrance  to  the  Khyber,  to  join  a  force  under  Colonel 
Macdonell  assembling  to  resist  a  threatened  inroad  of  the  Mohmunds. 
These  companies  were  not  engaged  with  the  enemy,  but  in  1884  the 
officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  men  received  the  Indian  Medal 
for  the  North- West  Frontier  Campaigns.  They  returned  to  Peshawur 
early  in  January,  1864. 

A  small  detachment  of  the  regiment,  under  Lieutenant  Neil 
Campbell,  was  engaged  with  the  Mohmunds  in  the  affairs  of  Michnie 
and  Shubkudder.  Private  Burnett  of  the  79th  was  slightly  wounded. 

1864. 

On  the  7th  of  January  the  Cameron  Highlanders  marched  from 
Peshawur  to  Rawul  Pindee,  arriving  there  on  the  17th  of  the  same 
month.  On  the  4th  of  March  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  His 
Excellency  General  Sir  Hugh  Rose,  G.C.B.,  commander-in-chief  in 
India,  who  expressed  himself  much  pleased  with  the  high  state  of 
efficiency  in  which  he  found  it. 

In  April  the  79th  was  called  upon  to  furnish  volunteers  for  a 
working  party  on  the  Murree  and  Abbottabad  road,  and  on  the 
28th  a  party  of  300  of  all  ranks,  under  the  command  of  Captain 
Conway  Gordon,  proceeded  to  Camp  Durrgaw  Gully,  where  it 
remained  until  the  18th  of  July,  on  which  date  it  was  moved  into 
huts  at  Khyra  Gully.  It  re-joined  the  regiment  on  the  2nd  of 
November. 

In  the  month  of  October  the  79th  lost  by  exchange  its  senior 
lieutenant-colonel,  Colonel  Butt,  who  had  been  employed  as  Chief 
Inspector  of  Musketry  in  Bengal ;  he  exchanged  with  Colonel  Best  of 
the  86th  regiment.  By  this  exchange  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson 
became  the  senior  lieutenant-colonel. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  145 

For  some  time  after  its  arrival  at  Rawul  Pindee  the  regiment  con- 
tinued to  suffer  from  Peshawur  fever,  and  a  considerable  number  of 
men  were  invalided. 

1865. 

On  the  5th  of  April  a  draft,  consisting  of  1  captain,  3  subalterns, 
and  20  rank  and  file,  joined  head-quarters  from  the  depot  companies. 

On  the  8th  of  May  the  head-quarters  and  650  of  all  ranks  proceeded 
as  a  working  party  to  the  Murree  hills,  where  the  head-quarters  went 
under  canvas  at  Camp  Gora  Gully,  whilst  a  detachment  of  300  men, 
under  Major  Maitland,  were  stationed  at  Camp  Grogur  Gully. 

On  the  2nd  of  June  the  camp  was  visited  by  a  fearful  thunderstorm, 
and  a  large  tree,  which  had  been  struck  by  lightning,  fell  upon  the 
Sergeants'  Mess,  killing  Sergeant  Angus  upon  the  spot. 

The  health  of  the  men  greatly  improved  during  its  stay  in  the 
Murree  hills,  and  all  traces  of  Peshawur  fever  disappeared. 

On  the  2nd  of  June  the  regiment  went  into  huts  for  the  rainy  season 
at  Khyra  Gully,  and  remained  there  until  the  24th  of  October,  when 
it  returned  to  Rawul  Pindee. 

On  the  10th  of  July  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson  received  his 
promotion  by  brevet  to  be  full  colonel  in  the  army. 

1866. 

In  February  the  service  companies  were  augmented  by  a  draft  from 
the  depot  companies,  consisting  of  2  colour-sergeants,  3  corporals,  and 
44  privates. 

In  the  same  month  a  detachment  of  104  rank  and  file,  under 
Captain  Everett,  was  sent  to  Fort  Attock,  being  relieved  about  a 
month  afterwards  by  a  similar  detachment  under  Captain  Leith. 

On  the  21st  of  March  Colonel  R.  M.  Best  took  over  temporary 
command  of  the  regiment  from  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson,  who 
proceeded  home  on  fifteen  months'  leave  of  absence. 

A  detachment  of  170  of  all  ranks  was  again  sent  as  a  working  party 
to  the  Murree  Hills  on  the  28th  of  April,  under  the  command  of 
Captain  McNair;  this  detachment  returned  to  Rawul  Pindee  in 
October. 


146  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

On  the  28th  of  October  the  regiment  was  moved  from  Ravvul 
Pindee ;  the  head-quarters  and  left  wing,  under  Colonel  Best,  marching 
to  Roorkee,  and  the  right  wing,  under  Major  Maitland,  to  Delhi. 

1867. 

In  January  the  regiment  was  augmented  by  a  draft  from  the  depot 
companies,  consisting  of  1  captain  (Captain  Allen),  2  lieutenants,  and 
52  rank  and  file. 

The  regiment  suffered  greatly  from  fever  during  the  spring  of  1867, 
six  deaths  occurring  at  Roorkee  and  three  at  Delhi,  and  it  was  con- 
sidered desirable  to  encamp  the  wing  at  Roorkee  five  miles  away  from 
the  town. 

On  the  24th  of  December  Lieutenant-Colonel  Hodgson  returned 
from  leave  of  absence  and  resumed  command  of  the  regiment. 

About  the  end  of  the  year  the  wings  changed  places,  the  head- 
quarters remaining  at  Roorkee. 

1868. 

On  the  27th  of  April  a  draft  of  2  lieutenants,  3  sergeants,  and  78 
rank  and  file  joined  head-quarters. 

In  the  winter  months  of  1868  the  wings  again  exchanged  stations, 
the  left  wing  returning  to  head-quarters  and  the  right  wing  moving  to 
Delhi. 

1869. 

On  the  31st  of  January,  1869,  the  service  companies  were  augmented 
by  a  draft  from  the  depot  companies,  consisting  of  1  lieutenant, 
1  ensign,  1  sergeant,  and  130  rank  and  file. 

The  regiment  left  Roorkee  for  Umballa  on  the  19th  of  March,  1869, 
having  received  orders  to  join  a  force  collecting  at  that  station  to  take 
part  in  the  ceremonial  on  the  occasion  of  the  meeting  between 
Earl  Mayo,  governor-general  of  India,  and  Shere  Ali  Khan,  Ameer  of 
Cabul.  The  head-quarters  and  left  wing,  under  the  command  of 
Colonel  Hodgson,  arrived  at  Umballa  from  Roorkee  on  the  21st  of 
March,  and  were  joined  on  the  following  day  by  the  right  wing  from 
Delhi,  under  the  command  of  Major  G.  M.  Miller.  The  79th  was 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  147 

encamped  near  the  Viceroy's  tent,  having  been  appointed  part  of  His 
Excellency's  personal  escort,  and  on  the  24th  of  March  it  furnished 
the  Guard  of  Honour  in  front  of  the  Durbar  tent  on  the  occasion  of  the 
meeting  of  the  Viceroy  and  the  Ameer  of  Cabul,  the  remainder  of  the 
regiment  being  employed  in  lining  the  streets.  It  was  similarly 
employed  a  few  days  later  when  the  Viceroy  paid  his  return  visit  to 
the  Ameer. 

The  head-quarters  and  left  wing  left  Umballa  on  the  5th  of  April, 
1869,  for  Roorkee,  and  on  the  7th  the  right  wing  returned  to  Delhi. 

In  May  the  79th  was  detailed  to  form  part  of  the  force  ordered  to 
assemble  at  Agra  in  December,  1869,  for  the  Grand  Durbar  in  honour 
of  His  Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  Edinburgh,  but  on  account  of  the 
prevailing  famine  the  orders  were  cancelled. 

On  the  7th  of  December  the  head-quarters  and  left  wing,  under  the 
command  of  Colonel  W.  C.  Hodgson,  left  Roorkee  en  route  to 
Kamptee.  They  were  joined  on  the  15th  of  December  by  the  right 
wing  from  Delhi  at  Camp  Jubbulpore.  Here  the  regiment  remained 
until  the  24th  of  December,  when  it  commenced  to  move  by  companies 
towards  Kamptee,  at  which  station  the  head-quarters  arrived  on  the 
1st  of  January,  1870. 

1870. 

During  the  month  of  January,  1870,  the  93rd  Sutherland  Highlanders 
passed  through  Kamptee  en  route  for  home,  and  the  following  letter 
was  received  by  the  President  of  the  Officers'  Mess  of  the  79th 
Highlanders : — 

"  At  a  meeting  held  at  Camp  Nagpore  by  the  officers  93rd  Sutherland 
Highlanders,  on  the  30th  of  January,  1870,  it  was  proposed,  and 
carried  unanimously,  that  a  letter  be  written  the  officers  79th  Cameron 
Highlanders,  proposing  that,  in  consideration  of  the  friendship  and 
cordiality  which  has  so  long  existed  between  them,  the  officers  of  the 
two  corps  be  perpetual  honorary  members  of  their  respective  messes, 
and  the  same  should  be  formally  recorded  in  the  regimental  records. 

"  In  accordance  with  the  above  resolution,  the  officers  of  the  93rd 
Sutherland  Highlanders  have  much  pleasure  in  informing  the  officers, 
79th  Cameron  Highlanders,  that  they  are  henceforth  perpetual 


148  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

honorary  members  of  the  93rd  mess,  and  that  a  formal  entry  to  that 
effect  has  been  made  in  the  records  of  the  93rd  Highlanders. 

(Signed)         "  R.  S.  WILLIAMS,  Major, 
"  President  Mess  Committee 

"  93rd  Sutherland  Highlanders." 
"Camp  Deolali, 

"6th  February,  1870." 

The  following  reply  was  sent : — 

"At  a  mess  meeting  held  at  Kamptee,  India,  on  the  12th  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1870,  a  letter  was  read  from  the  officers  of  the  93rd  Sutherland 
Highlanders,  dated  Camp  Deolali,  6th  of  February,  1870,  and  the 
proposition  contained  in  it,  to  the  effect  that,  *  in  consideration  of  the 
friendship  and  cordiality  which  has  so  long  existed  between  the  two 
corps,  the  officers  should  be  perpetual  honorary  members  of  their 
respective  messes,'  was  accepted  as  a  high  compliment  to  the  79th 
Highlanders  and  carried  unanimously.  The  officers  of  the  79th 
Cameron  Highlanders  have  therefore  the  pleasure  of  informing  the 
officers  of  the  93rd  Sutherland  Highlanders  that  they  are  henceforth 
perpetual  honorary  members  of  the  79th  mess,  and  that  the  above 
resolution  has  been  duly  entered  in  the  records  of  the  regiment. 

(Signed)         "A.  B.  MURRAY,  Lieutenant, 

"  P.M.C.,  79th  Highlanders." 
"  Kamptee,  India, 

"  10th  March,  1870." 

The  following  officers  were  present  at  this  important  mess  meeting: — 

Colonels  W.  C.  Hodgson  and  Best;  Lieutenant-Colonel  K.  R. 
Maitland ;  Major  G.  M.  Miller ;  Captains  J.  M.  Leith,  D.  McDonald, 
J.  E  Allen,  E.  Everett,  A.  N.  Clay,  N.  Campbell,  H.  Currie,  and 
C  H.  Miers ;  Lieutenants  R.  M.  Borthwick,  A.  B.  Murray,  W.  D.  S. 
Campbell,  J.  Busfield,  G.  Quin,  C.  R.  K.  Fergusson,  A.  L.  H.  Holmes, 
J.  Angus,  J.  D.  K.  McCallum,  and  O.  B.  Gordon ;  Ensigns  R.  II.  C. 
Dalzell,  J.  M.  Brown,  N.  G.  Chalmers,  H.  McLeod,  G.  L.  C.  Money, 
C.  C.  Mackenzie,  and  J.  F.  Shaw-Kennedy ;  Paymaster,  Major  D.  Cant; 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  149 

Quarter-Master   W.    Simpson;    Surgeon   A.   S.    Lithgow ;    Assistant- 
Surgeons  A.  Doig  and  J.  F.  Beattie. 

The  regiment  remained  at  Kamptee  for  nearly  two  years  furnishing 
a  detachment  to  Fort  Nagpore,  and  sending  many  parties  of  con- 
valescents to  the  Sanitariums  of  Wellington  and  Chindwarrah. 

1871. 

In  1871  the  regiment  was  called  upon  to  send  a  detachment  to 
Puchmurree. 

On  the  2nd  of  August  the  junior  lieutenant-colonel  of  the  regiment, 
Colonel  R.M.  Best,  was  appointed  to  the  command  of  the  Nagpore 
Field  Force,  with  the  rank  of  brigadier-general. 

In  the  same  month  the  79th  received  orders  to  be  in  readiness  to 
proceed  to  England,  and  about  177  non-commissioned  officers  and 
men  availed  themselves  of  the  permission  given  to  volunteer  into 
regiments  remaining  in  India. 

A  sad  event  occurred  whilst  the  regiment  remained  at  Kamptee. 
On  August  28th  Captain  Donald  McDonald  fell  down  suddenly  on 
parade,  when  at  great  gun  drill  at  the  Artillery  Barracks,  and  died 
instantaneously.  He  was  by  birth  and  habits  a  Highlander,  and 
was  most  warmly  attached  to  the  regiment,  in  which  he  had  served  for 
seventeen  years.  Great  sorrow  was  felt  by  all  ranks  at  his  untimely 
and  unexpected  death,  and  a  monument  was  erected  by  his  brother 
officers  over  his  grave  at  Kamptee. 

On  the  22nd  of  September,  1871,  the  left  half  battalion,  under 
the  command  of  Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel  Maitland,  marched  from 
Kamptee  to  Nagpore,  and  from  thence  proceeded  by  rail  to  Deolali. 
The  head-quarters  and  right  half  battalion,  under  the  command  of 
Colonel  W.  C.  Hodgson,  followed  the  next  day.  The  regiment 
remained  a  few  days  only  at  Deolali,  where  the  men  were  supplied 
with  sea  kits,  and  on  the  30th  of  September  the  79th,  preceded  by 
a  baggage  guard  of  200  men,  moved  by  rail  to  Bombay  and  embarked 
for  England  on  board  Her  Majesty's  Indian  troopship  Jumna.  The 
undermentioned  officers  embarked  with  the  regiment : — 

Colonel  W.  C.  Hodgson;  Lieutenant-Colonels  K.  R.  Maitland 
and  G.  Miller;  Captains  J.  M.  Leith,  J.  E.  Allen,  A.  N.  Clay, 


150  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

W.  H.  McCausland,  and  H.  Currie ;  Lieutenants  R.  Me.  G.  Borthwick, 
W.  D.  S.  Campbell,  C.  R.  K.  Fergusson,  S.  C.  Bucknall,  and  J.  Angus ; 
Ensigns  R.  H.  C.  Dalzell,  J.  M.  Brown,  N.  G.  Chalmers,  H.  T. 
McLeod,  G.  L.  C.  Money,  C.  C.  Mackenzie,  J.  F.  Shaw-Kennedy, 
and  P.  J.  Graeme ;  Paymaster,  Major  D.  Cant  ;  Lieutenant  and 
Adjutant  A.  Hume ;  Quarter-Master  W.  Simpson  ;  Surgeon  S.  A. 
Lithgow ;  Assistant  Surgeons  A.  Doig  and  J.  F.  Beattie ;  Chaplain 
Rev.  C.  Morrison. 

The  Jumna  sailed  for  England  at  12  noon  on  the  1st  of  October, 
and,  after  a  prosperous  voyage  by  the  Suez  Canal,  arrived  at  Spithead 
on  the  6th  of  November.  On  the  following  day  the  regiment  was 
transhipped  to  H.M.  Ships  Pigmy >,  Camel,  and  Grinder ;  and  conveyed 
to  West  Cowes,  where  it  disembarked  and  marched  to  the  Albany 
barracks  at  Parkhurst. 

During  the  fourteen  years  that  the  regiment  had  been  stationed  in 
India  it  was  inspected  by  many  distinguished  general  officers,  including 
Sir  Colin  Campbell,  Sir  William  Mansfield  (afterwards  Lord  Sandhurst), 
Sir  Hugh  Rose,  Sir  Hope  Grant,  Sir  Percy  Herbert,  Sir  Sydney 
Cotton,  and  Sir  John  Garvock,  all  of  whom  expressed  themselves 
highly  pleased  with  the  appearance,  conduct,  and  discipline  of  the 
Cameron  Highlanders. 

1872. 

In  February,  1872,  Her  Majesty  the  Queen,  who  was  at  Osborne, 
was  pleased  to  express  her  desire  to  see  the  79th  Highlanders  in 
inarching  order.  The  regiment  accordingly  paraded  at  10  a.m.  on 
the  16th,  and  proceeded  towards  Osborne.  When  the  79th  was 
within  a  short  distance  of  the  approach  to  the  house,  Her  Majesty, 
with  several  members  of  the  Royal  Family,  appeared  at  an  angle  of 
the  road,  and  watched  the  regiment  march  past  with  great  interest. 
The  regiment,  after  making  a  detour  towards  East  Cowes,  was  return- 
ing to  Parkhurst  by  way  of  Newport,  when  Her  Majesty  re-appeared, 
paying  particular  attention  to  the  dress  and  appearance  of  the  men  as 
they  marched  past  her  for  the  second  time. 

This  was  the  last  occasion  on  which  Colonel  Hodgson  was  destined 
to  command  the  regiment  on  parade.  He  died,  after  a  very  short 
illness,  on  the  1st  of  March,  to  the  great  grief  of  all  ranks  of  the  79th 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  151 

Highlanders.  He  had  served  in  the  regiment  for  32  years  and 
commanded  it  for  12  of  them,  endearing  himself  to  everyone  by  his 
invariable  kindness. 

Colonel  Maitland,  in  announcing  Colonel  Hodgson's  death  in 
regimental  orders,  thus  speaks  of  him  : — 

"  The  officers  have  to  lament  the  loss  of  one  who  was  always  to 
them  a  kind  and  considerate  commanding  officer ;  and  the  non-com- 
missioned officers  and  men  have  been  deprived  of  a  true  friend,  who 
was  ever  zealous  in  guarding  their  interests  and  promoting  their 
welfare.  Lieutenant-Colonel  Maitland  feels  that  this  day  will  be 
regarded  by  all  ranks  of  the  79th  Highlanders  in  after  years  as  a  day 
on  which  the  regiment  sustained  a  loss  as  sad  as  it  was  unexpected." 

The  funeral  took  place  on  the  5th  of  March  and  was  very 
numerously  attended.  Every  officer,  non-commissioned  officer,  and 
man,  off  duty,  of  the  79th  Highlanders  and  103rd  Fusiliers  was 
present,  and,  in  addition,  the  officers  of  the  Isle  of  Wight  Militia  and 
Volunteers,  the  officials  of  Parkhurst  prison,  and  many  pensioners 
followed  to  the  grave. 

By  Colonel  Hodgson's  death  Colonel  Maitland  succeeded  to  the 
command  of  the  regiment,  but  he  retired  on  half  pay  on  the  19th  of 
October  following,  and  Lieutenant-Colonel  Miller  was  selected  to 
succeed  him. 

On  the  17th  of  September  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  the 
honour  of  being  reviewed  by  the  ex-Emperor  of  the  French, 
Napoleon  III.,  and  the  Prince  Imperial,  who  lunched  with  the  officers. 
His  Majesty  made  a  very  minute  inspection  of  the  men,  and  afterward 
witnessed  the  regiment  perform  some  manoeuvres  under  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Miller.  At  the  termination  of  the  inspection  he  expressed 
his  admiration  of  the  splendid  appearance  and  physique  of  the 
men,  and  of  the  magnificent  manner  in  which  the  drill  had  been 
performed. 

On  the  27th  of  September  a  detachment,  consisting  of  1  captain, 
1  subaltern,  3  sergeants,  and  61  rank  and  file,  was  sent  to  Cliff  End 
Fort,  near  Freshwater.  This  detachment  re-joined  head-quarters  on 
the  1st  of  November. 


152  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

1873. 

On  January  14th  a  detachment  of  1  captain,  1  subaltern, 
3  sergeants,  and  67  rank  and  file  was  furnished  to  Marchwood 
Magazines,  near  Southampton. 

During  Her  Majesty's  stay  at  Osborne  the  79th  always  furnished  a 
Guard  of  Honour  at  East  Cowes.  On  the  17th  of  April,  1873,  Her 
Majesty  the  Queen  bestowed  upon  the  regiment  one  of  the  highest 
honours  in  her  power,  when  on  that  day  she  was  graciously  pleased  to 
attend  at  Parkhurst  barracks  and  present  it  with  new  colours. 

On  this  occasion  the  town  of  Newport  was  tastefully  decorated,  and 
many  triumphal  arches  were  erected  in  the  streets.  The  presentation 
took  place  in  the  drill  field,  and  was  witnessed  by  a  large  number  of 
spectators. 

At  11  a.m.  the  regiment  was  formed  up  on  parade  under  the 
command  of  Colonel  Miller,  the  other  officers  present  on  parade 
being  : — Majors  Cuming  and  Percival ;  Captains  Leith,  Allen,  Everett, 
Clay,  McCausland,  Miers,  Oldham,  Borthwick,  and  Murray ;  Lieut- 
enants Busfield,  Methuen,  Bucknall,  Forbes-Gordon,  Annesley,  Brown, 
Chalmers,  Money,  Mackenzie,  Smith,  and  Graeme ;  Sub-Lieutenants 
Smythe  and  Hunt ;  Paymaster,  Major  Cant ;  Lieutenant  and  Adjutant 
Hume  ;  Surgeon-Major  Lithgow  and  Surgeon  Doig. 

The  ground  was  kept  by  the  102nd  Fusiliers,  which  regiment  also 
furnished  a  Guard  of  Honour  for  Her  Majesty.  General  Viscount 
Templetown,  K.C.B.,  commanding  the  district,  and  Sir  John  Douglas, 
K.C.B.,  commanding  in  Scotland,  (with  his  A.D.C.,  Lieutenant 
O.  B.  Gordon  of  the  79th,)  were  present.  The  Mayor  and  Corporation 
of  Newport  attended  officially  in  their  robes  of  office. 

At  11.45  a.m.  Her  Majesty  arrived,  attended  by  their  Royal 
Highnesses  Prince  Leopold  and  Princess  Beatrice,  the  Countess  of 
Errol,  and  other  ladies.  The  Royal  party  having  driven  along  the 
line  the  usual  order  of  presentation  was  proceeded  with. 

The  old  colours  were  in  front  of  the  left  of  the  line  under  double 
sentries,  the  new  colours  were  in  rear  of  the  centre  of  the  line  in  charge 
of  the  two  senior  colour-sergeants — Taylor  and  Mackin.  The  old 
colours  were  then  trooped  and  carried  off  parade  by  Lieutenants 
Annesley  and  Money  to  the  strains  of  "Auld  Lang  Syne."  When 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  153 

this  ceremony  was  over  the  regiment  was  formed  into  three  sides  of  a 
square,  with  the  drums  piled  in  the  centre,  the  new  colours  being 
uncased  and  placed  against  the  drums  by  the  majors.  The  prayer  of 
consecration  was  then  offered  by  the  Rev.  Charles  Morrison,  formerly 
chaplain  of  the  79th  in  India,  who  came  from  Aberdeen  expressly  for 
this  duty.  When  this  was  concluded,  Major  Cuming  handed  the 
Queen's  colour,  and  Major  Percival  the  regimental  colour,  to  Her 
Majesty,  who  presented  the  former  to  Lieutenant  Campbell  and  the 
latter  to  Lieutenant  Methuen,  saying  at  the  same  time  : — 

"  It  gives  me  great  pleasure  to  present  these  new  colours  to  you. 
In  thus  entrusting  you  with  this  honourable  charge,  I  have  the  fullest 
confidence  that  you  will,  with  the  true  loyalty  and  well-known  devotion 
of  Highlanders,  preserve  the  honour  and  reputation  of  your  regiment, 
which  have  been  so  brilliantly  earned  and  so  nobly  maintained  by  the 
79th  Cameron  Highlanders." 

Colonel  Miller  then  replied  : — 

"  I  beg  permission,  in  the  name  of  all  ranks  of  the  79th  Cameron 
Highlanders,  to  express  our  loyal  and  most  grateful  acknowledgment 
of  the  very  high  honour  it  has  pleased  your  Majesty  this  day  to  confer 
upon  the  regiment. 

"  The  incident  will  ever  remain  fresh  in  the  memories  of  all  on  parade, 
of  those  who  are  unable  to  have  the  honour  of  being  present  on  this 
occasion,  and  of  others  who  have  formerly  served  with  the  79th  ;  and 
I  beg  to  assure  your  Majesty  that,  wherever  the  course  of  events  may 
require  these  colours  to  be  borne,  the  remembrance  that  they  were 
received  from  the  hands  of  our  most  gracious  Queen  will  render  them 
doubly  precious,  and  that  in  future  years,  as  at  present,  the  circumstance 
of  this  presentation  will  be  regarded  as  one  of  the  proudest  episodes 
in  the  records  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders." 

After  Colonel  Miller's  address  the  regiment  re-formed  line,  and  the 
colours  were  received  with  a  general  salute,  after  which  they  were 
marched  to  their  place  in  line  in  slow  time,  the  band  playing  "  God 
save  the  Queen."  The  ranks  having  been  closed,  the  regiment  broke 
into  column  and  marched  past  Her  Majesty  in  quick  and  double 


154  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

time.  Line  was  again  formed,  and  Lieutenant-General  Viscount 
Templetown  called  for  three  cheers  for  Her  Majesty,  which  was 
responded  to  by  the  regiment  in  true  Highland  style.  An  advance  in 
review  order  and  a  royal  salute  concluded  the  parade,  after  which  Her 
Majesty  drove  away. 

After  the  parade  was  dismissed  the  old  colours,  carried  by  Lieutenants 
Annesley  and  Money  and  escorted  by  all  the  sergeants,  were  carried 
round  the  barracks,  and  afterwards  deposited  at  the  officers'  mess. 

At  the  unanimous  request  of  the  officers  the  old  colours  were 
offered  by  Colonel  Miller  to  Her  Majesty,  and  as  she  was  pleased  to 
accept  them  they  were  conveyed  to  Osborne  on  the  22nd  of  April. 
The  regiment  paraded  in  review  order  at  12  noon  on  that  day  and  was 
formed  in  line  for  the  colours  to  pass  along  it,  each  man  presenting 
arms  as  they  passed  him,  whilst  the  band  played  "  Auld  Lang  Syne." 
The  old  colours  then  proceeded  by  train  from  Newport  to  Cowes, 
being  received  at  Osborne  by  a  Guard  of  Honour,  under  Captain  Allen 
and  Lieutenants  Bucknall  and  Smith;  carried  by  Lieutenants  Annesley 
and  Money,  and  escorted  by  Quarter-Master-Sergeant  Knight,  Colour- 
Sergeant  Clark,  two  sergeants,  and  four  privates,  they  were  then 
marched,  with  the  pipers  in  front,  to  the  door. 

The  officers  then  advanced,  and — kneeling — placed  the  colours 
at  Her  Majesty's  feet,  when  Colonel  Miller  read  the  following 
statement : — 

"  I  beg  to  inform  your  Most  Gracious  Majesty  that  these  colours 
were  presented  to  the  79th  Highlanders  at  Portsmouth  in  the  month 
of  April,  1854,  by  Mrs.  Elliot  (the  wife  of  the  officer  at  that  time 
colonel  of  the  regiment),  a  few  days  before  the  regiment  embarked  for 
the  Crimea.  They  were  carried  at  the  Alma,  Balaclava,  Kertch,  and 
during  the  operations  which  led  to  the  capture  of  Sebastopol,  also 
throughout  the  campaign  of  the  Indian  Mutiny,  from  November,  1857, 
when  the  regiment  landed  at  Calcutta,  including  the  siege  and  capture 
of  Lucknow,  the  attack  on  Fort  Rooyah,  actions  of  Secundragunge, 
Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  the  capture  of  the  fort  of 
Rampore  Russia  and  Mahomdie,  the  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad, 
and  the  operations  in  Oudh  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  Rivers. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  155 

After  the  submission  of  the  rebels  they  were  borne  by  the  regiment  at 
Mean    Meer,    Ferozepore,    Nowshera,    Peshawur,    Rawul    Pindee, 
Roorkee,  and  Kamptee,  and  were  brought  home  by  the  corps  on  its- 
return  in  November,  1871." 

He  then  added  :  "  It  having  graciously  pleased  your  Majesty  to  accept 
these  colours  from  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  I  beg  permission  to 
express  the  gratification  which  all  ranks  of  the  79th  feel  in 
consequence,  and  to  convey  most  respectfully  our  highest  appreciation 
of  this  kind  act  of  condescension  on  the  part  of  your  Majesty." 

The  Queen  replied :  "  I  accept  these  colours  with  much  pleasure, 
and  shall  ever  value  them  in  remembrance  of  the  gallant  services  of 
the  79th  Cameron  Highlanders.  I  will  take  them  to  Scotland  and 
place  them  in  my  dear  Highland  home  at  Balmoral." 

The  guard  then  presented  arms  and  the  colour  party  withdrew. 
Her  Majesty  afterwards  addressed  a  few  words  to  each  of  the  colour- 
sergeants. 

On  the  24th  of  April  Colonel  Miller  received  orders  for  the  troops 
of  the  Parkhurst  garrison  to  march  towards  Osborne  on  the  following 
day  for  Her  Majesty's  inspection.  They  accordingly  paraded  at  10  a.m. 
in  review  order,  and  on  arriving  at  Osborne,  the  brigade  was  drawn 
up  in  line  on  the  road,  with  the  79th  on  the  right  and  the  102nd  on 
the  left.  Her  Majesty  was  received  with  a  royal  salute  and  the  troops 
twice  marched  past  her  carriage  in  fours. 

It  may  here  be  stated,  that,  on  the  day  of  the  presentation  of  colours 
to  the  regiment,  Colonel  Ponsonby,  by  command  of  the  Queen,  wrote 
to  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief  as  follows  : — 

"Osborne,  17th,  April  1873. 

"Sift, 

"  I  am  directed  by  the  Queen  to  let  your  Royal  Highness 
know  that  Her  Majesty  this  morning  presented  new  colours  to  the  79th 
Highlanders  at  Parkhurst.  The  usual  ceremony  took  place,  and  at 
the  conclusion  the  legiment  gave  three  cheers  tor  the  Queen.  Her 
Majesty  was  extremely  pleased  with  the  appearance  of  the  men,  and 
the  manner  in  which  they  moved,  and  hopes  that  your  Royal  Highness 


156  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

may  think  it  right  to  communicate  the  Queen's  opinion  to  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Miller,  the  commanding  officer.  Lord  Templetown  and  Sir 
John  Douglas  were  present ;  and  the  prayer  was  made  by  the  Rev. 
Mr.  Morrison,  formerly  Presbyterian  chaplain  to  the  corps. 

(Signed)       "  HENRY  F.  PONSONBY." 
"  The  Field  Marshal, 

"  Commanding-in-Chief." 

Shortly  after  the  presentation  of  colours  the  Queen  again  showed 
her  regard  for  the  regiment  by  presenting  to  it  four  copies  of  her  book. 
"  Leaves  from  our  Journal  in  the  Highlands :"  one  for  Colonel  Miller, 
one  for  the  officers,  one  for  the  non-commissioned  officers,  and  one  for 
the  men. 

On  the  2nd  of  June  the  regiment  furnished  a  detachment  to  Fort 
Victoria,  consisting  of  one  company,  and  on  the  following  day  the 
Marchwood  detachment  re-joined  head-quarters. 

On  the  llth  of  July,  1873,  the  following  letter  was  received  from 
the  Horse  Guards  : — 

"Horse  Guards,  10th  July,  1873. 
"SIR, 

"  By  direction  of  the  Field-Marshal  Commanding-in-Chief,  I 
have  the  honour  to  acquaint  you  that  Her  Majesty  has  been  pleased 
to  command  that  the  79th  regiment  be  in  future  styled  '  79th  Queen's 
Own  Cameron  Highlanders,'  that  the  facings  be  accordingly  changed 
from  green  to  blue,  and  that  the  regiment  be  also  permitted  to  bear  in 
the  centre  of  the  second  colour,  as  a  regimental  badge,  the  '  Thistle 
ensigned  with  the  Imperial  Crown,'  being  the  badge  of  Scotland  as 
sanctioned  by  Queen  Anne  in  1707,  after  the  confirmation  of  the  act 
of  Union  of  the  Kingdoms. 

(Signed)        "  J.  W.  ARMSTRONG, 

"  Deputy- Adjutant-General." 
"  Lieutenant-Colonel  Miller, 

"  Commanding  79th  regiment." 

On  the  12th  of  July  Colonel  Miller  sent  the  following  acknowledg- 
ment to  Major-General  Ponsonby  : — 


79TH   CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  1^7 

"  Parkhurst  Barracks, 

"  Isle  of  Wight,  12th  July,  1813. 
"  SIR, 

"  A  letter  having  been  received  by  me  this  morning,  dated 
Horse  Guards,  War  Office,  10th  July,  1873,  intimating  by  command 
of  His  Royal  Highness,  the  Commander-in-Chief,  that  Her  Majesty 
had  been  pleased  to  command  that  the  regiment  under  my  command 
be  styled  *  The  79th  Queen's  Own  Cameron  Highlanders,'  I  have  the 
honour  to  request  that  you  will  convey  to  the  Queen,  in  the  name  of  all 
ranks  of  the  79th,  our  most  respectful  and  grateful  acknowledgments 
for  so  distinguished  a  mark  of  royal  condescension,  and  I  beg  that 
you  will  assure  Her  Majesty  of  the  gratification  felt  throughout  the 
regiment  in  consequence  of  the  above  announcement. 
"  I  have  the  honour,  etc, 

(Signed)  "  G.  M.  MILLER, 

"  Lieutenant-Colonel, 
"  Commanding  79th  Queen's  Own  Cameron  Highlanders." 

"  To  Major-General  Ponsonby, 

"  Equerry  in  waiting, 

"  Osborne." 

On  the  13th  of  August  Lieutenant- Colonel  Miller  received  a  notifi- 
cation that  Her  Majesty  had  expressed  a  wish  that  the  regiment  should 
be  drawn  up  as  a  Guard  of  Honour  at  East  Cowes  on  her  departure 
from  the  Isle  of  Wight  the  following  day.  It  accordingly  marched  to 
East  Cowes  the  following  afternoon  and  presented  arms  as  Her 
Majesty  left  for  Balmoral. 

On  the  18th  of  September  the  79th  left  Parkhurst  for  Aldershot, 
where  it  arrived  the  same  day,  occupying  "  A  "  and  "  B  "  lines,  South 
Camp.  It  was  attached  to  the  1st,  Major-General  Parke's  brigade. 

On  the  25th  of  November  this  regiment  was  called  upon  to  give 
2  officers  and  130  rank  and  file  as  volunteers  to  the  42nd  Black  Watch, 
under  orders  to  form  part  of  an  expedition  proceeding  on  active  service 
to  the  Gold  Coast  under  Major-General  Sir  Garnet  Wolseley. 

More  than  half  the  regiment  volunteered,  eager  for  active  service, 
and  the  required  number  were  selected. 


158  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

On  the  4th  of  December  the  volunteers,  under  Lieutenants  Annesley 
and  McCallum,  joined  the  42nd  at  Portsmouth,  embarking  the  same 
day  on  the  SS.  Sarmatian. 

They  arrived  at  Cape  Coast  Castle  on  the  16th  of  December  and 
disembarked  on  the  3rd  and  4th  of  January. 

1874. 

The  79th  Volunteers  were  divided  amongst  the  companies  of  the 
42nd,  and  with  them  were  present  on  the  31st  of  January  at  the  battle 
of  Amoaful,  at  the  attack  and  burning  of  the  town  of  Becquah,  on 
Sunday,  the  1st  of  February,  at  the  battle  of  Ordahsu,  and  at  the 
capture  of  Coomassie.  The  capture  of  Coomassie  and  the  flight  of 
the  King  of  Ashantee  brought  hostilities  to  a  close,  and  the  42nd 
re-embarked  on  board  the  Sarmatian  and  arrived  at  Portsmouth  on 
the  22nd  of  March. 

On  the  30th  of  March  the  whole  of  the  troops  engaged  in  the 
Ashantee  War  were  reviewed  by  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  at  Windsor ; 
the  men  of  the  79th,  under  Lieutenants  Annesley  and  McCallum, 
forming  a  company  by  themselves,  marched  past  with  the  42nd,  and 
afterward  re-joined  the  79th  at  Aldershot.  The  officers  and  men 
engaged  in  this  campaign  received  the  war  medal  and  clasp  for 
Coomassie. 

The  79th  contingent  had  6  rank  and  file  killed,  and  Lieutenant 
Annesley  and  31  rank  and  file  wounded. 

Medals  for  distinguished  conduct  in  the  field  were  awarded  to 
Privates  William  Bell  (who  lost  his  right  arm),  George  Cameron,  and 
Henry  Jones  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 

On  the  7th  of  March,  1874,  the  regiment  proceeded  to  Windsor, 
and  lined  the  streets  on  the  occasion  of  the  arrival  of  their  Royal 
Highnesses  the  Duke  and  Duchess  of  Edinburgh,  returning  to 
Aldershot  the  same  evening. 

On  the  19th  of  the  same  month,  the  79th  took  part  in  a  review 
before  the  Czar  of  Russia,  being  brigaded  with  the  42nd,  78th,  and 
93rd  Highlanders,  under  the  command  of  Major-General  Parke,  C.B. 

In  the  months  of  June  and  July  the  regiment  participated  in  the 
summer  manoeuvres  at  Aldershot,  being  attached  at  different  periods 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  159 

to  the  1st  and  3rd  brigades,  under  Major-General  Herbert  and  Colonel 
Anderson  respectively. 

1875. 

During  the  summer  manoeuvres  for  1875,  the  79th  again  formed 
part  of  the  1st  brigade  1st  division  2nd  Army  Corps,  under  the 
command  of  Major-General  Sir  John  Douglas,  K.C.B. 

On  the  28th  of  July  the  regiment  left  Aldershot  for  Portsmouth, 
where  it  embarked  on  board  H.M.S.  Himalaya^  and  sailed  for  Scotland. 
It  arrived  at  Leith  on  the  evening  of  the  30th,  and,  disembarking  on 
the  2nd  of  August,  occupied  quarters  in  Edinburgh  Castle.  On 
arrival  at  the  Castle,  Sir  John  Douglas,  K.C.B. ,  commanding  the  North 
British  district,  who  was  accompanied  by  Colonel  Butt,  late  of  the 
79th,  briefly  addressed  the  regiment,  complimenting  the  men  on  the 
high  character  they  bore,  and  urging  them,  on  their  return  to  their 
native  land,  after  an  absence  of  20  years,  not  to  forget  that  the 
regiment  was  always  noted  for  its  general  good  bearing  in  quarters, 
and  to  remember  that  it  was  the  duty  of  each  individual  one  of  them 
to  do  his  utmost  to  maintain  the  credit  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 

The  streets  were  densely  crowded  as  the  regiment  marched  from 
Granton  to  the  Castle. 

A  detachment  of  1  captain,  1  subaltern,  3  sergeants,  and  41  rank 
and  file  were  ordered  almost  immediately  on  arrival  to  Greenlaw. 

On  the  16th,  17th,  and  18th  of  August  the  regiment  furnished 
Guards  of  Honour  to  Her  Majesty  the  Queen  at  Holyrood,  and  on  the 
17th  it  lined  the  streets  when  she  unveiled  the  statue  of  the  Prince 
Consort. 

On  the  25th  of  September,  "  H  "  company,  consisting  of  1  captain, 
1  lieutenant,  and  35  non-commissioned  officers  and  men,  proceeded 
on  detachment  to  Dundee,  and  the  same  evening  "  A  "  company, 
under  the  command  of  Brevet-Major  J.  M.  Leith,  with  2  subalterns 
and  55  of  all  ranks,  left  for  Ballater  to  form  a  Guard  of  Honour  to  Her 
Majesty. 

"  B  "  company,  consisting  of  1  captain,  1  subaltern,  and  44  non- 
commissioned officers  and  men,  was  sent  on  detachment  to  Stirling 
on  the  2nd  of  October. 


160  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

1876. 

On  the  12th  of  October  the  head-quarters  and  five  companies  left 
Edinburgh  and  embarked  at  Granton  pier  on  board  H.M.S.  Assistance. 
The  Assistance  arrived  off  Fort  George  the  following  morning,  and 
the  regiment  landed  and  occupied  quarters  in  the  fort.  On  the  24th 
of  November  Major  Leith's  company  re-joined  from  Ballater. 

1877. 

On  the  16th  of  May,  1877,  "A"  company,  under  Brevet-Major 
Leith,  again  went  to  Ballater  as  a  Guard  of  Honour. 

On  the  5th  of  June  the  detachment  from  Dundee  re-joined  head- 
quarters, and  on  the  25th  "  A  "  company  returned  from  Ballater. 

The  annual  inspection  of  the  battalion  was  held  by  Major-General 
Ramsay  Stuart,  C.B.,  commanding  the  North  British  district,  on  the 
6th  and  7th  of  July,  on  which  occasion  he  informed  the  regiment  on 
parade  that  he  considered  it  "  in  splendid  order." 

On  the  25th  of  July  a  large  draft  of  13  corporals,  2  drummers,  and 
271  privates  was  sent  by  the  79th  to  join  the  42nd  at  Malta,  the  42nd 
being  linked  to  the  regiment  under  the  brigade  depot  system. 

On  the  22nd  of  August  "  C  "  company,  consisting  of  1  captain, 
2  subalterns,  3  sergeants,  1  piper,  t  drummer,  and  49  privates,  went 
to  Ballater  as  a  Guard  of  Honour  to  Her  Majesty. 

The  regiment  embarked  on  board  H.M.S.  Orontes  on  the  18th  of 
October,  under  the  command  of  Major  and  Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel 
Cuming,  and  arrived  at  Greenock  on  the  21st  of  the  same  month. 
The  following  day  it  moved  to  Glasgow,  where  the  head-quarters  and 
"  A "  and  "  B  "  companies  occupied  the  Gallowgate  barracks,  the 
remainder  of  the  regiment  going  to  Maryhill,  being  joined  the  same 
day  by  "  C  "  company  from  Ballater. 

On  the  31st  of  October  Colonel  Miller  was  placed  upon  half  pay, 
after  commanding  the  regiment  for  five  years.  He  was  succeeded  in 
command  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  E.  W.  Cuming. 

1878. 

On  the  15th  of  March  the  head-quarters  moved  from  the  Gallowgate 
barracks  to  Maryhill, 


£  >#> 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  161 

On  the  20th  of  the  same  month  '  *F  "  company,  under  Captain 
Busfield,  proceeded  to  Ballater  as  a  Guard  of  Honour  to  Her 
Majesty. 

On  the  1st  of  April  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was  raised 
to  1  colonel,  1  lieutenant-colonel,  1  major,  8  captains,  8  lieutenants, 
8  second-lieutenants,  1  adjutant,  1  quarter-master,  48  sergeants, 
40  corporals,  23  drummers  and  pipers,  and  960  privates,  exclusive  of 
the  depot  companies.  On  the  28th,  167  of  the  Royal  Ayr  and  Wigton 
Militia  Reserve  were  posted  to  the  regiment  during  the  mobilization 
of  the  reserves.  These  reservists  remained  out  with  the  regiment 
until  the  31st  of  July. 

On  the  1st  of  August  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was 
reduced  again. 

On  the  24th  of  August  a  Guard  of  Honour,  under  Captain  A.  N. 
Forbes-Gordon,  consisting  of '2  lieutenants  (Lieutenants  Chalmers  and 
Money)  and  54  non-commissioned  officers  and  men,  proceeded  to 
Ballater. 

1879. 

On  the  14th  of  January  Lieutenant-General  Sir  John  Douglas, 
G.C.B.,  was  appointed  to  the  full  colonelcy  of  the  regiment  in  suc- 
cession to  General  Sir  Alfred  Horsford,  G.C.B.,  transferred  to  the 
14th  regiment. 

On  the  15th  of  May  the  regiment  was  placed  under  orders  for 
immediate  embarkation  to  relieve  its  linked  battalion,  the  42nd 
Highlanders,  at  Gibraltar,  and  it  embarked  on  board  H.M.S.  Himalaya 
at  Greenock  on  the  3rd  of  June,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  E.  W.  Cuming.  Strength  :  3  field  officers,  17  captains  and 
subalterns,  35  sergeants,  18  drummers,  and  485  rank  and  file. 

During  the  period  that  the  regiment  was  stationed  at  Glasgow 
270  recruits  were  raised  at  head-quarters  and  208  at  the  brigade  depot 
(42nd  and  79th)  at  Perth. 

The  79th  landed  at  Gibraltar  on  the  llth  of  June  and  occupied  the 
Buena  Vista  barracks. 

On  the  6th  of  November  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  His 
Excellency  the  Governor,  Lord  Napier  of  Magdala,  who  expressed 
his  entire  satisfaction  at  the  appearance  of  the  corps. 

M 


162  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

1880. 

On  the  10th  of  March,  1880,  the  regiment  moved  from  Buena  Vista 
to  the  Town  Range  barracks,  relieving  the  93rd  Highlanders.  Two 
companies  were  detached  for  duty  to  the  North  front. 

On  the  23rd  of  September  a  draft  of  2  sergeants,  2  corporals,  and 
153  privates  joined  the  regiment  from  the  42nd  Royal  Highlanders. 
Many  of  these  men  had  served  before  in  the  79th. 

On  the  24th  and  25th  of  November  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were 
inspected  by  Major-General  Anderson,  commanding  the  infantry 
brigade,  who  expressed  great  satisfaction  at  the  state  in  which  he 
found  the  regiment. 

On  the  27th  of  December,  on  the  departure  of  the  97th  regiment 
for  Natal,  the  head-quarters  and  four  companies  occupied  the  South 
barracks,  leaving  three  companies  at  Wellington  front  and  1  company 
at  the  musketry  camp  at  the  North  front*. 

1881. 

On  the  3rd  of  January  the  three  companies  at  Wellington  front 
re-joined  the  head-quarters  at  the  south  barracks. 

During  the  month  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was  raised 
from  600  to  700  privates. 

It  was  early  in  this  year  that  the  scheme  of  army  reorganization  was 
framed.  This  scheme  proposed  the  abolition  of  the  existing  system 
of  linked  battalions  and  regimental  numbers,  and  the  substitution  of 
territorial  regiments  of  the  line ;  each  territorial  regiment  to  consist 
of  two  line  battalions,  with  the  Militia  and  Volunteers  of  the  district. 

As  the  79th  was  at  this  time  linked  to  the  42nd  Black  Watch,  it  was 
proposed  to  make  it  the  2nd  Territorial  battalion  of  that  regiment,  and 
the  following  telegram  was  received  on  January  the  28th  by  the 
officer  commanding  from  the  Adjutant-General : — 

"  If  79th  is  linked  to  42nd  will  your  regiment  adopt  tartan  of  42nd 
regiment?  Linked  regiments  must  wear  the  same  tartan.  Wire 
reply." 

Although  the  Cameron  Highlanders  would  have  been  proud  to  be 
associated  with  the  old  Black  Watch,  by  whose  side  they  have  so 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  163 

often  stood  on  many  a  hard-fought  field,  yet  such  a  proposal  meant 
the  practical  extinction  of  the  former,  and  all  ranks  were  unanimous 
in  declining  to  entertain  it.  Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith  (who  was  in 
command  of  the  regiment  during  the  absence  of  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Cuming  on  sick  leave)  accordingly  sent  the  following  telegram  in 
reply  :— 

"  No. — The  Cameron  Highlanders  will  not  adopt  42nd  tartan." 
At  the  same  time  he  wrote  and  despatched  this  letter  by  post : — 

To    the  Adjutant-General,   Horse    Guards,   Pall    Mall,   London. 

"  Gibraltar,  30th  January,  1881. 

"  SIR, 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  forward  a  copy  of  a  telegram 
despatched  by  me  this  morning  in  reply  to  your  telegram  received 
yesterday  evening,  which,  in  transmission  through  Spain,  had  become 
somewhat  illegible. 

"  It  was  with  the  greatest  sorrow  that  the  officers  of  the  79th 
Cameron  Highlanders  heard  of  the  proposal  to  deprive  the  regiment 
of  the  Cameron  tartan,  worn  by  them  for  so  many  years  and  regarded 
with  pride  and  affection  by  all  ranks.  No  one  serving  in  the  79th 
would  willingly  adopt  the  tartan  of  the  42nd  regiment,  which  would 
virtually  mean  the  extinction  of  the  79th  Cameron  Highlanders  as  a 
regiment. 

"  May  I  most  respectfully  request  that  you  will  have  the  goodness 
to  move  His  Royal  Highness  the  commander-in-chief  to  preserve, 
if  possible,  for  the  regiment  that  tartan  which  has  been  the  distinctive 
dress  since  they  were  raised  in  1793  by  Sir  Alan  Cameron,  and,  as 
the  inscriptions  on  the  colours  testify,  has  been  worn  with  honour  in 
many  hard-fought  battles. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

"  Your  obedient  servant, 

(Signed}  "  J.  M.  LEITH, 

"  Lieutenant-Colonel, 
"  Commanding  79th  Queen's  Own  Cameron  Highlanders." 


4  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

Nothing  further  was  heard  of  the  matter  until  Mr.  Childers,  the 
Secretary  of  State  for  War,  in  his  comprehensive  speech  in  the  House 
of  Commons  on  the  new  scheme,  announced  that  the  79th  would  be 
the  only  single  battalion  regiment  in  the  army,  and  a  short  time 
afterwards  the  following  letter  was  received  : — 

"  Horse  Guards,  War  Office,  S.W. 

"5th  April,    1881. 

"  SIR, 

"  With  reference  to  your  letter  of  the  30th  of  January  last,  I 
have  the  honour,  by  desire  of  the  Field  Marshal  Commanding-in- 
Chief,  to  acquaint  you  that>  as  the  regiment  under  your  command  is 
to  have  a  separate  existence  under  the  new  linking,  it  is  presumed  that 
the  regiment  will  now  retain  its  tartan. 

"  I  have  the  honour  to  be,  Sir, 

"  Your  obedient  servant, 

"  R.  BLUNDELL,  A.A.G." 
"  To  the  Officer  Commanding 

"  79th  Regiment,  Gibraltar." 

On  the  1st  of  April  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was  increased 
from  700  to  800  privates. 

On  the  1st  of  July,  1881,  the  day  on  which  the  Army  Reorganization 
Scheme  came  into  effect,  the  time  honoured  old  number — 79th — was 
discontinued,  and  the  regiment  was  designated  by  its  title  alone — "  The 
Queen's  Own  Cameron  Highlanders."  It  became  the  Territorial 
regiment  of  the  county  of  Inverness,  in  which  it  was  first  raised,  being 
joined  as  such  with  the  "  Highland  Light  Infantry  Militia,"  which 
now  became  the  2nd  battalion  of  the  Queen's  Own  Cameron 
Highlanders. 

The  depot  was  located  at  Inverness,  but,  as  the  barracks  there  were 
not  yet  completed,  it  was  sent  temporarily  to  Fort  George. 

The  following  officers  were  at  this  time  serving  in  the  2nd 
battalion  : — 


Colonel  Simon  Lord  Lovat 
Major     W.  M.  Bankes 
„         T.  A.  Macdonald 
W.  Donaldson 


Captain  G.  A.  Duff 
J.  T.  Shaw 


G.  R.  McKessack 

H.  L.  B.  Langford-Brooke 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


165 


Captain  A.  D.  Mackintosh  of  Mackintosh 
C.   J.  Merry 
H.  W.  Kemble 
„          W.  H.  Garforth 
„          W.  G.  S.  Meuzies 
Lieutenant  G.  T.  B.  Mostyn 
„  C.  L.  McKenzie 

E.  G.  F.  Tytler 
Lieutenant  J.  M.  Hanbury 
,,  C.  Aytouii 

A.  A.  S.  Anderson 


Lieutenant  E.  Grant 

R.  W.  E.  Grant 
„  C.  Marjoribanks 

„  A.  G.  Ferguson 

„  N.  C.  Greenhill-Gardyue 

„  R.  A.  Paterson 

„  W.  D.  Wolrige-Gordon 

Quarter-Master     P.  Forbes 

Surgeon      D.  McFadyen 

Adjutant      H.  J.  Knight,  Captain,  Sea- 
forth  Highlanders 


„  W.  T.  Fraser-Tytler 

On  the  1st  of  July  Lieutenant-Colonel  E.  W.  Cuming  was  placed 
upon  the  retired  list ;  he  was  succeeded  in  command  by  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  J.  M.  Leith. 

On  the  17th  of  November  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  Major- 
General  Adams,  who  expressed  himself  thoroughly  satisfied  with  its 

efficiency. 

1882. 

On  the  1st  of  May,  1882,  the  rank  of  Warrant  Officer  was  introduced 
in  the  line  regiments. 

On  the  15th  of  March  a  draft  of  1  sergeant  and  119  rank  and  file, 
under  the  command  of  Major  O.  B.  Gordon,  joined  the  regiment  from 
the  depot. 

Before  leaving  Gibraltar  a  handsome  mural  tablet,  with  the  following 
inscription,  was  erected  by  the  regiment  in  the  Presbyterian  Church, 
in  memory  of  their  comrades  who  died  during  the  stay  of  the  regiment 

on  the  Rock  : — 

THE  79TH 
QUEEN'S  OWN  CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS. 

TO   THE  MEMORY 

OF  THE  UNDERMENTIONED 
OFFICERS,  NON-COMMISSIONED  OFFICERS,  AND  PRIVATES, 

WHO   DIED  WHILST  THE  REGIMENT  WAS 
STATIONED  AT  GIBRALTAR, 

1879—82. 


Cuimhne 
N«ui  Sonn  Nach  MaAwann, 


166  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Lieutenant  Colin  C.  Mackenzie  -  -  -  Died  at  Gibraltar,  15th  Sept.,  1880 

2nd  Lieutenant  Hon.  Charles  Cathcart  -  -  „  London,  21st  May,  1880 

1172  Sergeant  Thomas  Sim  "G"  Company  „  Gibraltar,  29th  Jan.,  1880 

1592  Corporal  David  Eoss  "F"  „  „  „  30th  July,  1882 

1485  Drummer  William  Wallace  "  C "  .,  „  „  20th  Sept.,  1881 

1988  Private  William  Wigham  "  H "  „  „  „  15th  Sept,  1879 

1595  „  Robert  Graham  "F"  „  „  „  20th  June,  1880 

899  „  John  Gorman  "  B "  ,,  „  „  22nd  June,  1881 

2357  „  Thomas  Scott  "E)!  „  „  „  23rd  July,  1881 

165         „  James  Foster        "D"  „  „  „          10th  May,    1882 

In  June,  1882,  events  in  Egypt  proclaimed  a  state  of  war  imminent; 
and  the  refusal  of  Arabi  Pasha  to  discontinue  working  at  the  fortifica- 
tions around  Alexandria  resulted  in  the  bombardment  of  the  forts  by 
the  fleet  on  the  llth  of  July.  The  first  intimation  that  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  were  likely  to  be  sent  out  was  received  on  the  8th  of 
July,  when  the  Quarter-Master-General  telegraphed  to  Lord  Napier, 
the  General  Commanding  at  Gibraltar,  enquiring  whether  they  could 
be  furnished  with  regimental  transport  if  they  should  be  required  to 
embark. 

An  affirmative  reply  was  sent,  and  the  79th  at  once  prepared  for  a 
campaign.  On  the  14th  the  regiment  was  ordered  to  embark,  and 
from  this  time  until  the  day  of  embarkation  everybody  was  busily 
engaged  in  making  preparations,  every  telegram  was  scanned  and 
eagerly  discussed,  and  an  intense  feeling  of  excitement  and  enthusiasm 
ran  throughout  the  regiment.  Bitter  regrets  were  expressed  when  an 
order  arrived  for  no  man  under  20  years  of  age  to  embark,  and 
application  after  application  was  sent  in  for  this  to  be  modified,  but 
it  was  only  done  in  the  case  of  drummers,  who  were  all  permitted 
to  go. 

The  Queen's  colour  only  was  taken.  Lieutenant  Halkett  was 
detailed  to  remain  in  charge  of  women,  children,  men  pronounced 
unfit  for  service,  and  those  under  20  years  of  age.  Lieutenant  Racket- 
Thompson  was  appointed  Transport  Officer,  and  commenced  his 
duties. 

On  the  7th  of  August  the  regiment  marched  from  the  South  barracks 
to  the  New  Mole  for  embarkation  on  board  H.M.S.  Orontes.  It  was 
drawn  up  on  the  parade  at  the  New  Mole  for  inspection  by  Lord 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  167 

Napier  of  Magdala.  A  wing  of  the  95th  regiment,  which  had 
received  sudden  orders  to  embark  for  Egypt  at  the  same  time,  paraded- 
on  its  right. 

After  the  inspection,  Lord  Napier  addressed  the  regiment  in  the 
following  terms  : — 

"  Colonel  Leith,  and  the  Queen's  Own  Cameron  Highlanders. 
You  are  about  to  leave  Gibraltar  for  active  service,  after  having  been 
quartered  here  for  more  than  three  years.  Perhaps  we  take  a  special 
interest  in  you  from  having  seen  your  young  striplings  grow  up  into 
fine  men  during  the  time  you  have  been  here.  You  have  a  very  noble 
list  of  campaigns  on  your  colours,  commencing  with  Holland,  then 
Egypt,  the  country  to  which  you  are  again  going ;  and  there  are  few 
parts  of  the  world  where  your  colours  have  not  been  borne,  and  on  every 
occasion  they  have  gained  honour,  and  I  am  sure  it  will  be  the  same 
now,  if  you  have  the  opportunity. 

"Your  conduct  during  the  long  time  you  have  been  here  has  been 
most  satisfactory,  your  steadiness  and  regularity  in  barracks  and 
elsewhere  have  been  remarkable ;  this  is  the  foundation  of  a  good 
regiment,  and  these  qualities  combined  in  the  fine  men  I  see  in  your 
ranks  make  me  confident  that  the  Cameron  Highlanders  can  go  any- 
where and  do  anything.  I  shall  have  the  pleasure  and  honour  of 
reporting  to  Her  Majesty  that  the  Cameron  Highlanders  embarked  in 
the  best  order,  and  not  a  single  man  absent.  I  now  bid  you  farewell, 
wishing  you  every  success,  being  sure  that  you  will  upon  all  occasions 
do  your  duty,  and  that  if  the  opportunity  should  occur  you  will  cover 
yourselves  with  glory." 

The  regiment  then  embarked,  and  at  12  noon  amidst  a  burst  of  cheer- 
ing, and  the  strains  of  "  Auld  Lang  Syne,"  the  Orontes  started. 
The  following  officers  embarked  with  the  regiment : — 
Lieutenant-Colonels  J.  M.  Leith  and  St.  Leger  j  Majors  McCausland, 
Gordon,    and    Chalmers ;    Captains   Hunt  and   Reid ;  Lieutenants 
Hacket-Thompson,  Blackburn,  Hon.  Ivan  Campbell,  Scott,  Mackenzie, 
Malcolm,  Grant,  D.  F.  Davidson,  Macleod,  C.  Davidson,  Scott-Elliot, 
Cavaye  and  J.  S.  Ewart;  Captain  and  Adjutant  K.  S.  Baynes;  Quarter- 


168  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

Master  Howard  ;  Paymaster,  Major  McNair  ;  Surgeon-Major  Will  ; 
Warrant  Officer,  Sergeant- Major  J.  Campbell. 

The  regiment  was  to  form  one  of  the  Highland  brigade,  under 
Major-General  Sir  Archibald  Alison,  Bart,  K.C.B.,  in  the  2nd 
division,  under  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Edward  Hamley,  C.B., 
K.C.M.G. 

After  an  uneventful  voyage  the  Orontes  arrived  off  Alexandria  about 
7  a.m.  on  the  14th,  and  it  was  reported  that  the  regiment  would  not 
disembark  until  the  arrival  of  Sir  Garnet  Wolseley. 

On  the  19th  of  August  the  regiment  disembarked,  and  proceeded 
to  Ramleh,  outside  Alexandria,  where  it  went  under  canvas.  The 
75th  was  already  encamped,  but  the  other  two  regiments  of  the 
Highland  brigade,  the  42nd  and  74th,  were  yet  to  come. 

On  the  20th  and  22nd  of  August  the  regiment  took  part  in  recon- 
naissances against  the  enemy's  position  at  Kafr  Dowar.  On  each 
occasion  it  was  exposed  to  a  heavy  fire  of  big  guns,  but  there  were  no 
casualties. 

On  the  22nd  the  Black  Watch  and  74th  Highland  Light  Infantry 
arrived,  and  encamped  beyond  the  79th  lines.  Their  arrival  com- 
pleted the  Highland  brigade  and  the  2nd  division. 

On  the  29th  it  was  announced  that  the  Highland  brigade  would 
proceed  to  Ismailia,  and  form  part  of  the  force  which  Sir  Garnet 
Wolseley  was  assembling  there. 

Orders  were  given  to  strike  camp  on  the  30th,  and  at  2.30  p.m.  all 
arrangements  having  been  completed,  the  regiment  marched  to  the 
station,  and  was  conveyed  to  Alexandria,  and  proceeded  to  embark 
on  board  the  hired  transport  Lusitania,  on  which  were  also  Lieutenant- 
General  Sir  Edward  Hamley  and  his  staff. 

On  the  1st  of  September  anchor  was  dropped  in  Lake  Timsah,  but 
disembarkation  was  postponed,  and  until  it  took  place  the  regiment 
was  employed  on  fatigue  duties  landing  stores. 

On  the  4th,  H.M.S.  Malabar  came  in,  and  a  draft  of  reservists  in 
charge  of  Captain  Chapman,  Lieutenant  Urquhart,  and  Lieutenant  S. 
Macdougall  (93rd  Highlanders),  joined  the  regiment.  Its  strength 
was  3  sergeants,  9  corporals,  3  drummers,  and  150  privates.  Amongst 


7IMH   CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  !<<'> 

them  thf:re  were  a  few  old  79th  men,  but  the  majority  were  from  the 
'.J.'JH,  91st,  and  other  regiments. 

On  the  8th,  orders  were  given  for  the  brigade  to  disembark  on  the 
following  day;  all  baggage  was  to  go  by  train  with  the  tents;  two  days' 
r .it ions  were  to  be  carried  in  the  carts.  Valises  were  to  go  by  train, 
;nifl  etcfa  rnan  was  to  carry  his  blanket  rolled  in  place  of  his  great  coat, 
hi  men  tin,  and  70  rounds  of  ammunition. 

At  about  1.30  p.m.  the  regiment  disembarked  in  three  tugs,  and 
;i  slight  delay  on  shore  the  Highland  brigade  started  on  its  march 
across  the  desert. 

After  marching  for  about  half-an-hour  a  slight  halt  was  made,  and 
the  march  again  resumed,  and,  with  frequent  halts,  £1  Magfar, 
<li:,t;mt  nine  miles,  was  reached  about  9  p.m.  Numbers  of  men  fell 
out.  ( luring  the  last  few  miles,  but  all  were  present  when  the  march 
began  next  day. 

Here  the  brigade  bivouacked,  the  regiment  furnishing  a  picquet, 
ling  of  half  of  "  E"  Company,  under  Lieutenant  D.  Davidson. 

At  4  o'clock  next  morning  the  march  was  continued  two  miles  to 
Tel-el-Mahuta,  where  the  brigade  halted  for  the  day.  The  heat  was 
terrific,  and,  as  there  was  no  shelter  from  it,  it  was  quite  over- 
powering. At  5  p.m.  the  brigade  moved  on  to  Mahsameh,  which  was 
reached  about  10  p.m. 

Starting  at  4  o'clock  the  next  morning,  Kassassin  was  reached  about 
8  a.m.,  and  after  the  tents  had  been  brought  from  the  station  and 
pitched,  the  regiment  rested,  to  prepare  for  the  decisive  battle  which 
was  now  daily  expected. 

At  10  a.m.  on  the  12th  the  following  brigade  order  was  issued  ; — 

"  Commanding  officers  are  to  be  very  particular  about  the  fitness  of 
water-carts,  which  will  be  filled  and  follow  in  rear  of  the  battalions, 
and  to  make  sure,  by  the  personal  inspection  of  company  officers  at 
r>  p.m.  to-day,  that  every  man  has  his  water-bottle  filled,  if  possible, 
with  cold  tea. 

"  Commanding  officers,  through  officers  commanding  companies, 
must  impress  upon  their  men  the  absolute  necessity  of  carrying  and 


170  HISTORICAL    RtCORPS    OF    THE 

husbanding  rations,  which  will  be  issued  to  them  to-day,  as,  until  the 
period  for  which  these  rations  are  issued  expires,  nothing  more  can 
be  obtained  from  the  Commissariat 

••  As  many  spare  water-bottles  as  possible  will  be  sent  to  the  brigade 
from  head-quarters,  so  that  a  certain  number  of  each  company  will 
carry  two  water-bottles.     To-night  the  men  will  carry  100  rour 
ammunition  in  their  pouches,  but  no  blankets.    Officers  commanding 
must  arrange  regimentally  as  to  the  best  mode  of  carrying  this  i 
ammunition. 

"  In  each  corps  the  mode  must  be  uniform. 

"  In  the  event  of  a  night  march  taking  place  the  utmost  attention 
must  be  paid  to  perfect  silence  in  the  ranks  :  the  slightest  sound 
when  near  the  enemy  might  cause  the  miscarriage  of  the  best  planned 
enterprise. 

"  Reserve  ammunition  of  each  battalion  will  follow  it  into  action, 
and  the  most  careful  arrangements  must  be  made  by  officers  com- 
manding for  the  bringing  up  of  ammunition  from  the  mules  to  the 
companies  engaged. 

"The  stretchers  assigned  to  each  regiment  must  follow  it  in  charge 
of  the  medical  officer,  who  is  responsible  for  the  best  arrangements 
that  circumstances  will  permit  for  the  care  of  the  wounded. 

"  The  Major-General  will  see  commanding  officers  at  head-quarters 
at  3  p.m." 

At  about  4  p.m.  Lieutenant-Colonel  J.  M.  Leith  returned  to  camp 
and  gave  out  the  following  orders : — 

"Camp  to  be  struck  at   5.4o  p.m.;    tents,  blankets,  great-c 
valises,  and  band  instruments  to  be  piled  alongside  the  railway  and 
left  in  charge  of  a  guard. 

"  The  regiment  to  fall  in  at  6.30  p.m.  Each  man  to  carry  100 
rounds  of  ammunition. 

"  The  position  of  Tel-el-Kebir  is  to  be  attacked  with  the  bayonet  ; 
no  one  is  to  load  :  not  a  shot  is  to  be  fired  until  over  the  entrench- 
ments," 


7'JlH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  171 

Arabi's  strongly  entrenched  position  was  to  be  stormed,  and  the 
old  70th  was  to  go  into  battle  for  the  first  time  since  the  Indian 
Mutiny. 

The  camp  was  struck  at  6.30  p.m.,  and  the  Highland  brigade 
formed  up  in  line  of  quarter  columns  near  the  railway— the  42nd  on 
the  right,  74th  on  the  left,  the  75th  next  to  the  42nd,  then  the  79th. 

The  strength  of  the  regiment  on  parade  was — 


2  Lieutenant-Colonels 

3  Majors 

3  Captains 
14  Subaltern* 
1  Adjutant 
I  Quarter-Master 


1  Surgeon-Major 
1  Chaplain 
48  Sergeants 
47  Corporals 

23  Drummers  and  Pipers 
660  Privates 


The  following  officers  were  with  the  regiment : — 

Lieutenant-Colonels  J.  M.  Leith  and  St.  Leger;  Majors  McCausland, 
Gordon  (on  staff  of  Sir  E.  Hamley),  and  Chalmers ;  Captains  Hunt, 
Reid,  and  Chapman ;  Lieutenants  Racket-Thompson,  Blackburn, 
Hon.  Ivan  Campbell,  Mackenzie,  Malcolm,  Grant,  D.  F.  Davidson, 
Macleod,  C.  Davidson,  Scott-Elliot,  Cavaye,  Ewart,  and  Macdougall ; 
Captain  and  Adjutant  Baynes ;  Quarter-Master  Howard;  Surgeon- 
Major  Will ;  the  Rev.  David  Arthur  ;  and  Sergeant-Major  J.  Campbell. 
The  advance  was  begun  by  the  74th,  and  the  remainder  followed  in 
echelon  to  Nine  Gun  Hill.  Here  the  brigade  deployed  into  two  lines, 
each  regiment  having  four  companies  in  the  front  line,  and  four  in 
support. 

The  march  upon  Tel-el-Kebir  was  continued  at  1  a.m.  The  right 
of  "  A  "  company  (Captain  Hunt)  was  the  flank  of  direction  of  the 
brigade.  Lieutenant  R.  Macleod  was  the  right  guide ;  he  was 
directed  by  Lieutenant  Rawson,  R.N.,  who  steered  by  the  stars. 

The  weird  night  march,  long  to  be  retained  in  the  annals  of  the 
regiment  and  the  country,  can  never  be  forgotten  by  those  who  took 
part  in  it ;  the  monotonous  tramp,  the  sombre  lines,  the  dimly 
discerned  sea  of  desert  faintly  lighted  by  the  stars,  were  at  once 
ghostly  and  impressive.  The  pace  was  necessarily  slow ;  one  halt 
was  made,  and  shortly  afterwards  the  directing  star  having  become 


172  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

concealed  another  one  was  chosen,  and  the  direction  slightly  changed 
to  the  right.  The  42nd,  74th,  and  75th,  did  not  at  once  conform,  and 
the  consequence  was  that  a  halt  had  to  be  made  as  these  regiments 
found  themselves  almost  facing  each  other. 

This  line  was  quickly  and  silently  re-formed,  and  the  advance 
continued. 

Just  as  dawn  was  breaking  two  shots  were  fired  from  the  left  front, 
and  Private  James  Pollock  of  the  regiment  fell  dead.  It  was  now 
evident  that  the  regiment  was  close  upon  the  enemy.  Bayonets  were 
at  once  fixed. 

In  a  few  seconds  these  two  shots  were  followed  by  others ;  the 
bugles  of  the  Egyptians  rang  out,  shells  screamed  above,  and  a  line  of 
fire  poured  from  the  enemy's  trenches.  The  79th  moved  steadily  on 
in  an  unbroken  line,  not  a  shot  was  fired  in  reply ;  but  on  the 
"  advance  "  for  the  brigade  being  sounded  by  Sir  Archibald  Alison's 
bugler,  drummer  John  Alcorn  of  the  79th,  Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith 
galloped  to  the  front,  waving  his  sword  and  crying,  "Come  on,  79th! " 
and  breaking  into  double  time,  to  the  shrill  music  of  the  pipes, 
and  cheering  as  they  ran,  the  regiment  charged  the  enemy's  lines. 
Private  Donald  Cameron  was  the  first  to  gain  the  top  of  the  trench ; 
but  fell  dead  at  once,  shot  through  the  head.  The  trench  was  now 
full,  and,  mounting  on  each  other's  shoulders  and  scrambling  up,  the 
front  line  gained  the  fiery  top.  Lieutenant  Malcolm  jumped  down 
amongst  some  gunners,  one  of  whom  wounded  him  on  the  head,  but 
he  cut  his  assailant  down  with  his  claymore. 

Flash  after  flash  continued  along  the  line  until  the  bayonets  of  the 
79th  had  done  their  work,  and  the  inside  of  the  trench  was  full  of 
dead  and  dying. 

The  Egyptians  retired  straight  to  the  rear,  kneeling  to  fire  as  they 
ran. 

The  front  line  followed  the  enemy  in  a  confused  mass,  Pipe- 
Major  Grant  playing  the  March  of  the  Cameron  Men  lustily. 

The  second  line  had  now  mounted  the  works,  and  became  mixed 
with  the  first.  An  attempt  was  made  by  the  Colonel  and  Adjutant  to 
form  up  the  regiment,  but  a  double  cross  fire  from  shelter  trenches 
on  each  side  had  to  be  silenced,  as  it  was  creating  havoc  in  the  ranks. 


79'i'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  173 

Daylight  was  breaking,  and  the  regiment  moving  to  the  left  cleared 
the  trench,  and  drove  back  the  enemy  in  confusion  through  a  small 
camp  in  rear  of  it. 

Colour-Sergeants  Newell,  Young  and  McLaren,  with  Corporal 
Syme,  advanced  to  a  redoubt  on  the  left,  and,  killing  three  gunners  in 
it,  drove  across  the  canal  some  Egyptian  cavalry  who  were  meditating 
a  charge.  Following  them  up  they  took  a  Krupp  gun,  and  turning  it 
round  fired  it  upon  the  retreating  foe. 

The  remainder  of  the  regiment,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith, 
with  the  42nd,  74th,  and  75th,  pushed  on,  and,  driving  all  before  them, 
arrived  at  the  crest  of  the  hill,  overlooking  Arabi's  camp  and  the 
railway  station.  Here  a  terrible  scene  of  confusion  appeared ;  the 
Egyptians  were  leaving  the  camp  by  hundreds,  some  running  across 
the  desert,  some  on  the  railway,  and  some  in  their  excitement  jumping 
into  the  canal. 

The  Highland  brigade,  with  some  of  the  46th  and  60th  Rifles,  who 
had  now  come  up,  cleared  the  camp  of  all  remaining  Egyptians,  and 
Arabi's  army  melted  in  the  distance  never  to  form  up  again. 

Major-General  Sir  Archibald  Alison  was  greeted  with  a  hearty  cheer 
as  he  passed,  and  Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith,  anxious  to  find  shade  for 
his  men,  marched  the  regiment  into  some  of  the  tents,  where  it  rested. 

Sergeant-Major  Joseph  Campbell  at  once  set  out  with  volunteers  to 
give  such  assistance  as  they  could  to  the  wounded,  and  they  found 
their  services  most  acceptable  to  Surgeon-Major  Will,  who,  in  spite  of 
dysentery,  from  which  he  had  been  suffering  since  the  regiment  left 
Ramleh,  was  lending  his  entire  energies  to  the  care  of  the  wounded, 
and  trying  to  alleviate  their  sufferings. 

In  the  storming  of  Tel-el-Kebir  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had 
Lieutenant  A.  G.  Blackburn,  (dangerously)  Lieutenant  H.  H.  L. 
Malcolm,  and  Lieutenant  S.  Macdougall  (very  severely)  wounded  ;  13 
rank  and  file  killed ;  4  sergeants  and  40  rank  and  file  wounded. 

The  following  is  a  complete  list  of  casualties  : — 

2049  Private  William  Bodle  .  "H"  Company     ...       Killed. 

2304  „  Robert  Brown  ...  "  E "         .,              ...           .. 

1455  „  Donald  Cameron  ...  "E" 

127  „  George  Crawford  ...  "B"         „ 


174 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 


117 

Private 

Alexander  Denniston 

"  A  "  Company 

2051 

55 

John  Hyslop 

"A" 

80 

j« 

Patrick  Kenny 

"C" 

2300 

,. 

Thomas  King 

"C"        „ 

1483 

55 

Alexander  Paterson 

"F"        „ 

2156 

55 

James  Pollock 

"F" 

2087 

,, 

George  Rugg 

"A"        „ 

2354 

» 

William  Simon 

"A" 

299 

55 

William  Smith        ... 

"E" 

Lieutenant  Adam  G.  Blackburn 

|| 

H.  H.  L.  Malcolm 

II 

S.  Macdougall 



wiaj 

f   Colour- 

(-Francis  Chapman    ... 

"  G  "  Company 

2125 

Sergeant 

Donald  Gunn 

"B"        „ 

999 

55 

Kennedy  Hewitt     ... 

"G" 

1378 

„ 

Alexander  Mackenzie 

"C" 

2099 

Corporal 

William  Cattanach 

"C" 

1873 

tt 

John  McKay 

"B"        „ 

1418-] 

[corporal] 

I  James  Cuming... 

«  TJ1  55 

•                        55 

2062 

M 

Francis  Tillie 

"E" 

2299 

Private 

David  Alexander    ... 

"C" 

1536 

55 

David  Bell    

"B" 

1261 

5) 

Thomas  Bottomley 

"E"         „ 

1055 

M 

Thomas  Brown 

"D" 

83 

55 

Martin  Burns 

"E" 

2247 

55 

William  Chapman  ... 

"B"        „ 

455 

;» 

James  Chassels 

"B" 

84 

55 

William  Cockcroft  ... 

"E" 

2175 

55 

James  Dick 

"H" 

124 

55 

Charles  Drummond 

"B" 

2192 

M 

John  Duff    

"C" 

1406 

55 

James  Hart 

"E"        „ 

2338 

55 

Henry  Herd 

"H" 

292 

„ 

Peter  Kynoch 

"G" 

1424 

?J 

Archibald  McAlister 

"G" 

1500 

John  McAlister 

"D" 

446 

?1 

John  McKale 

"F" 

908 

; 

William  Mackenzie 

"C"        ", 

1472 

., 

Thomas  McRae 

"G"        „ 

376 

?) 

Thomas  Meers 

"D"        „ 

146 

55 

Alexander  Murray 

"B"        „ 

Killed. 


Wounded. 


Died  of  wounds. 
Wounded. 


Died  of  wounds. 
Wounded. 

Died  of  wounds 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  175 

1565     Private        David  Murray         ...     "  H "  Company  ...       Died  of  wounds. 

2197         „              David  Nelson          ...      "E"        „  ...      Wounded. 

901         „  John  Page "  F " 

68         „              George  Quemby        .     "A"         .,  „ 

146         „               Robert  Robertson  ...     "F"         „  ...               „ 

550         „              James  Rodgers        ..      "A"        „  ...               „ 

426        „             John  Sheppard       ...     "A"         „  ...               ,, 

2266        „              John  Smith             ...     "C"         „  ...               „ 
1026         „              Robert  Spers           ...     "D"         „ 

215         „              Archibald  Telford           "E"         „  ..               „ 
2343         „             James  Walker         ..      "C" 

312        „              Michael  White         ...     "E"        „  ...              „ 

1439        „             William  Wilson      ...     "H"        „  ...               ., 

1662        „              William  Witherspoon     "H"         ,  ...               „ 

108        „  Luke  Young  ...     "E" 

The  following  officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  men  were 

reported  to  Major-General  Sir  Archibald  Alison  for  having  specially 
distinguished  themselves  during  the  action  : — 


Captain  and  Adjutant  K.  S.  Baynes 
Lieutenant  H.  H.  L.  Malcolm 
Lieutenant  S.  Macdougall 
Surgeon-Major  Will 
Sergeant-Major  J.  Campbell 
Colour- Sergeant  Newell 
Colour- Sergeant  Young 
Colour- Sergeant  McLaren 
Colour-Sergeant  Gunn 


Colour-Sergeant  McNeil 
Sergeant- Piper  Grant 
Sergeant-Drummer  Sanderson 
Sergeant  Souter 
Sergeant  Donald  Gunn 
Corporal  Syme 
Private  D.  Taylor 
Private  T.  Chalmers 
Private  Sheehan 


For  its  conduct  during  the  day  the  regiment  received  the  royal 
authority  to  have  the  word  "  Tel-el-Kebir  "  inscribed  on  its  colours 
and  appointments. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith,  Major  McCausland,  Captain  Hunt, 
Sergeant-Major  Campbell,  and  the  non-commissioned  officers  and 
men  above-named,  were  mentioned  in  Sir  Garnet  Wolseley's  des- 
patches, dated  the  2nd  of  November. 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Leith  was  appointed  a  Companion  of  the  Bath, 
and  received  the  3rd  Class  of  the  Medjidie. 

Major  McCausland  was  promoted  Brevet-Lieutenant-Colonel,  and 
received  the  4th  Class  of  the  Osmanieh. 


176  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Captain  Hunt  was  promoted  Brevet-Major,  and  received  the  4th 
Class  of  the  Medjidie. 

Lieutenant  Blackburn  received  the  5th  Class  of  the  Medjidie. 

For  their  gallant  services,  Sergeant-Major  Campbell,  Colour-Sergeant 
Young,  and  Sergeant  Donald  Gunn  received  medals  for  "  distinguished 
conduct  in  the  field." 

Sergeant  Souter  was  promoted  to  be  lieutenant  in  the  Black  Watch. 

At  4.30  p.m.  the  same  day  the  regiment,  with  the  74th  and 
75th,  marched  about  five  miles  towards  Zagazig  and  bivouacked  for 
the  night.  The  following  day  it  moved  on  to  Zagazig,  13  miles 
distant. 

On  entering  Zagazig,  about  6  p.m.,  the  72nd  Highlanders  were 
seen  encamped  on  the  other  side  of  the  canal,  and  raised  many  a 
cheer  as  the  regiment  passed.  They  formed  part  of  the  Indian 
contingent,  and  had  pushed  on  in  front  of  the  Highland  brigade. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  were  quartered  in  a  cotton  manufactory 
close  to  the  75th. 

Late  that  evening  orders  were  received  for  the  regiment  to  start 
for  Benha  by  train  at  6  a.m.  on  the  following  day ;  it  accordingly 
paraded  at  5  a.m.,  but  did  not  leave  till  about  9  a.m.  "  F  "  company, 
under  the  command  of  Lieutenant  Hon.  Ivan  Campbell,  was  left  as 
a  guard  for  the  baggage,  which,  with  the  officers'  chargers,  was  to 
follow  by  road. 

Arriving  at  Benha  at  about  9.30  a.m.,  a  large  building  in  the 
enclosure  of  the  palace  was  occupied  as  a  barrack,  but,  as  there  was 
nothing  but  stones  to  sleep  on,  some  sugar-canes  were  cut  to  make  a 
rough  sort  of  bedding. 

At  7  p.m.  that  day,  the  15th,  orders  were  received  for  the  79th 
to  go  to  the  station  and  line  the  railway,  to  capture  a  train  of 
men  and  guns  which  was  expected  from  Kafr  Dowar,  but  there 
was  no  opposition  offered,  and  it  was  therefore  dismissed  without 
marching  off. 

At  3  p.m.  on  the  16th  Major-General  Alison  sent  up  to  say  that 
at  4  p.m.  the  79th  was  to  go  by  train  to  Cairo,  and  marching  to  the 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  177 

station,  after  a  short  delay  caused  by  the  entraining  of  the  74th,  it 
started,  and  reached  Cairo  station  about  7.30  p.m. 

There  the  staff  officer  in  charge,  Major  Fraser,  R.E.,  directed  the 
colonel  to  march  to  the  Citadel,  which  was  entered  about  9  p.m.,  but 
no  one  knew  where  the  regiment  was  to  be  quartered,  so  they  slept 
in  some  unoccupied  rooms,  on  the  stones.  No  one  had  been  in  since 
the  Egyptians  marched  out,  and  the  smell  and  dirt  was  beyond 
description,  but  they  had  to  remain  there  until  the  21st,  when 
the  regiment  marched  to  Ghesireh  and  encamped  on  the  right  of 
the  74th. 

On  the  23rd,  the  42nd  arrived  from  Belbeis,  and  the  brigade  was 
completed  on  the  28th  by  the  arrival  of  the  7  5th  from  Tantah. 

On  the  1 3th  the  brigade  was  inspected  by  Sir  Garnet  Wolseley  who 
expressed  himself  well  pleased  with  the  appearance  and  drill  of 
the  79th. 

On  the  15th  a  draft  of  reservists,  consisting  of  4  sergeants,  10 
corporals,  2  drummers,  and  132  privates,  under  the  command  of 
Major  Miers  and  Lieutenants  Abercrombie  and  Toogood  of  the 
21st  Royal  Scots  Fusiliers,  joined  from  Cyprus. 

On  the  21st  Major-General  Sir  Archibald  Alison  handed  over  the 
command  to  Major-General  Graham,  V.C.,  and  at  a  parade  the  same 
day  made  the  following  address  : — 

"  Officers  and  men  of  the  Highland  brigade  : 

"The  exigencies  of  the  service  require  that  I  should  this  day  lay 
down  that  command,  which  three  short  months  ago  I  took  up 
with  so  much  pride.  I  cannot  quit  the  brigade  without  returning 
to  the  officers  commanding  battalions  my  most  sincere  thanks  for 
the  warm  and  uniform  support  which  I  have  ever  received  from 
them,  and  which  has  made  my  command  to  me  a  period  of  constant 
pleasure. 

"  I  have  to  thank  the  officers  for  the  admirable  way  in  which  they 
have  always  discharged  their  duties. 

"  I  have  to  thank  the  non-commissioned  officers  and  men  for  their 
excellent  conduct  in  quarters,  and  their  brilliant  gallantry  in  the 
field, 

N 


178  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

"  It  was  the  dream  of  my  youth  to  command  a  Highland  brigade  ! 
It  has  been  granted  to  me  in  my  old  age  to  lead  one  in  battle. 

"  This  brigade  has  been  singularly  fortunate  in  having  had  assigned 
to  it  so  important  a  part  in  what  must  ever  be  considered  one  of  the 
most  brilliant  victories  which  have  been  won  by  our  arms  in  modern 
times. 

"  There  is  one  thing  which  I  wish  to  impress  upon  you,  and  that 
is — it  was  not  the  fiery  valour  of  your  rush  over  the  entrenchments  of 
Tel-el-Kebir,  but  the  disciplined  restraint  of  the  long  night  march 
over  the  desert  preceding  it,  which  I  admired  the  most — that  was  one  of 
the  most  severe  tests  of  discipline  which  could  be  exacted  from  men, 
and  by  you  it  was  nobly  borne.  When  in  the  early  dawn  we  looked 
down  from  the  summit  of  the  ridge  upon  the  camp  of  Arabi  lying 
defenceless  at  our  feet,  and  upon  his  army  dissolving  before  us,  the 
first  thought  that  came  into  my  mind  was,  that  had  my  old  chief,  Sir 
Colin  Campbell,  risen  from  his  grave  he  would  have  been  proud  of 
you.  He  would  have  thought  that  you  had  well  maintained  the 
reputation  of  the  Highland  regiments,  and  the  honour  of  the  Scottish 
name  ;  he  would  have  deemed  you  the  worthy  successors  of  that  now 
historic  brigade  which  he  led  up  the  green  slopes  of  Alma  !  I  cannot 
do  better  than  wish  that  you  may  afford  to  that  distinguished  officer, 
Major-General  Graham,  to  whom  I  have  this  day  handed  over  the 
brigade,  the  same  satisfaction  that  you  have  given  to  me.  And  now, 
to  every  commanding  officer,  to  every  officer,  to  every  non-commis- 
sioned officer,  and  to  every  man  of  the  Highland  brigade,  I  wish 
1  God  speed.' " 

On  the  29th  the  regiment  moved  back  to  the  Citadel,  of  which 
Lieutenant  Colonel  J.  M.  Leith  became  commandant.  It  was  destined 
to  form  part  of  the  Army  of  Occupation  in  Egypt. 

1883. 

On  the  21st  of  February,  1883,  the  regiment  paraded  at  11.30  a.m. 
for  the  presentation  of  the  war  medals  by  Lady  Alison,  who  was 
accompanied  by  Major-General  Graham,  V.C. 

Whilst  the  regiment  was  waiting  drawn  up  in  line  at  open  order, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  179 

Lord  Napier  of  Magdala,  who  was  travelling  in  Egypt,  came  up,  and 
was  received  with  a  field  marshal's  salute.  It  did  the  regiment  good 
to  see  him,  and  they  would  have  liked  to  have  raised  a  cheer  for  the 
fine  old  soldier  who  had  so  much  endeared  himself  to  them  at 
Gibraltar,  and  whose  name  will  never  be  forgotten  by  the  79th 
Cameron  Highlanders. 

Previous  to  the  distribution,  General  Graham  addressed  the 
regiment,  complimenting  them  on  their  past  career,  and  regretting  the 
absence  of  Sir  Archibald  Alison,  who,  he  said,  having  been  with  them 
in  action,  would  have  spoken  more  accurately  of  the  exemplary 
services  which  they  had  rendered  during  the  recent  campaign,  and 
especially  as  to  their  gallant  storming  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 

He  concluded  by  saying — "You  men  who  have  survived  that  gallant 
charge,  and  who  are  about  to  receive  your  medals,  must  not  forget 
those  intrepid  comrades  whose  lives  were  sacrificed,  and  especially 
would  I  mention  Private  Donald  Cameron,  who  was  first  into  the 
trenches,  and  died  shot  through  the  head." 

Colonel  Leith  replied,  thanking  General  Graham  for  the  kind 
manner  in  which  he  had  referred  to  the  regiment,  and  expressing  a 
hope  that  it  would  in  the  future  maintain  the  high  reputation  which  it 
had  hitherto  enjoyed. 

The  medals  were  then  distributed,  Lady  Alison  pinning  them  on 
the  breasts  of  those  who  had  specially  distinguished  themselves. 

On  the  2nd  of  June  His  Highness  the  Khedive  presented  his  bronze 
stars  to  the  regiment  on  Abdin  Square. 

In  the  month  of  June  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was 
reduced  to  2  lieutenant-colonels,  3  majors,  5  captains,  12  subalterns, 
2  staff-officers,  2  warrant-officers,  40  sergeants,  21  drummers,  40  cor- 
porals, and  480  privates,  and  all  recruiting  for  the  regiment  at  home 
was  stopped. 

In  July  the  cholera,  which  had  been  raging  for  some  time  past  in 
Egypt,  seized  the  troops,  those  who  were  sick  in  hospital  being  the 
first  to  be  attacked,  and  in  most  cases  the  first  to  succumb. 

Four  men  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders  died  on  the  24th  of  July, 
and  on  the  following  day  the  regiment  went  into  camp  on  Mokkattam 


180  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

heights,  about,  a  mile  from  the  Citadel,  leaving  "  G"  company,  under 
Captain  Napier,  in  charge  of  the  barracks. 

The  effect  of  the  change  from  the  foul  atmosphere  of  the  Citadel 
to  the  fresh  ground  was  an  almost  complete  cessation  of  the  epidemic, 
and  whilst  the  regiment  was  under  canvas  only  two  other  cases 
occurred. 

The  undermentioned  men  of  the  regiment  died  during  this 
outbreak : 


Sergeant- Piper  J.  McGregor  Grant 
Private  John  Smith 

„       James  Cameron 

„       Thomas  Dodds 

„       Michael  Carrigan 


Private  William  Morrison 
„       Hugh  McKay 
„      Robert  McRae 
„      John  McLaggan 
John  Grant 


On  the  1st  of  September  the  regiment  returned  to  its  old  quarters  in 
the  Citadel. 

1884. 

In  January,  1884,  recruiting  was  again  opened  for  the  regiment,  but 
recruits  came  in  slowly,  and,  on  the  departure  of  the  first  expedition 
to  Suakim,  under  Major-General  Sir  Gerald  Graham,  V.C.,  K.C.B., 
the  regiment  was  so  weak  in  numbers,  having  fallen  below  home 
establishment,  that  it  could  not  take  part  in  it. 

Captain  and  Adjutant  Baynes,  as  assistant-military-secretary ;  Lieu- 
tenant Scott,  A. B.C.  to  Sir  Gerald  Graham  ;  Lieutenant  C.  Davidson, 
as  a  volunteer  with  the  Gordon  Highlanders  ;  and  about  fifteen 
non-commissioned  officers  and  men  of  the  regiment  accompanied  the 
expedition,  being  present  at  the  engagements  of  El  Teb  and  Tamaii. 
Captain  Baynes  and  Lieutenant  Scott  were  mentioned  in  Sir  Gerald 
Graham's  despatches,  and  Captain  Baynes,  in  recognition  of  his 
services,  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  brevet-major. 

During  the  absence  of  Sir  Gerald  Graham  at  Suakim  the  command 
of  the  Cairo  brigade  devolved  upon  Colonel  Leith,  C.B. 

From  the  1st  of  April  the  establishment  of  the  regiment  was  raised  to 
2  lieutenant-colonels,  3  majors,  5  captains,  16  subalterns,  2  staff- 
officers,  2  warrant-officers,  48  sergeants,  21  drummers  and  pipers, 
40  corporals,  and  760  privates. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  181 

On   the  30th   of  April  "A,"  "  B,"  "C,"  "  D,"  "  E,"  and  "H" 
companies,    under    Lieutenant-Colonel    St.    Leger,    proceeded  -on- 
detachment  to  Ramleh,  and  on  the  17th  of  May  "  C,"  "  D,"  and  "  E  " 
companies  returned  to  Cairo. 

On  the  9th  of  June  "A,"  "  B,"  and  "  H  "  companies,  under  the 
command  of  Major  Chalmers,  embarked  at  Ramleh  on  board  H.M.S. 
Alexandra,  and  were  conveyed  to  Port  Said,  where  they  were  quartered 
in  the  Dutch  House. 

On  the  5th  of  August  the  regiment  moved  from  the  Citadel  to 
Abdin  barracks,  and  on  the  19th  "C"  company,  under  Captain 
Napier,  proceeded  to  Assioot  in  Upper  Egypt. 

On  the  15th  of  September  a  draft,  consisting  of  1  sergeant, 
1  corporal,  and  54  rank  and  file,  under  Captain  Smith,  joined  head- 
quarters from  the  depot  at  Fort  George. 

On  the  9th  of  this  month  Lord  Wolseley  arrived  in  Egypt  to  assume 
command  of  an  expeditionary  force  to  proceed  up  the  Nile  to  the 
relief  of  General  Gordon,  who,  early  in  the  year,  accompanied  by 
Colonel  Stewart  only,  had  undertaken  to  attempt  the  withdrawal  of 
the  Egyptian  garrisons  in  the  Soudan  and  to  restore  order  in 
Khartoum,  and  whose  position  had  now  become  very  critical  in 
consequence  of  the  rapid  spread  of  the  Mahdist  rebellion. 

On  the  19th  of  September  General  Lord  Wolseley  inspected  the 
regiment  on  Abdin  Square,  and  expressed  himself  much  pleased  with 
the  appearance  of  the  men. 

On  the  15th  of  November  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  placed 
under  orders  to  proceed  up  the  Nile  to  join  the  expedition,  and,  after 
being  joined  by  the  detachment  from  Port  Said,  under  Major 
Chalmers,  it  left  Boulac  Dacroor  station  for  Assioot  on  the  18th  of 
that  month. 

The  following  officers  left  Cairo  with  the  regiment : 

Colonel  J.  M.  Leith,  C.B.,  Lieutenant-Colonel  St.  Leger,  Majors 
Everett,  Chalmers,  and  Money  ;  Brevet-Major  Hunt ;  Captain  Smith  ; 
Captain  Halkett ;  Lieutenants  Urquhart,  D.  Davidson,  Forbes,  Scott- 
Elliot,  Cavaye,  Riach,  Cameron,  and  McKerrell ;  Major  and  Adjutant 
K.  S.  Baynes  ;  Quarter-Master  Howard  ;  Paymaster,  Major  J.  Brown  \ 


182  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

Surgeon  Davies,  and  the  Rev.  D.  Arthur ;  Warrant-Officer,  Sergeant- 
Major  J.  Emslie. 

Captain  Napier  and  Lieutenants  Malcolm,  C.  Davidson,  Ewart  and 
Findlay,  had  already  proceeded  up  the  Nile  on  various  duties. 

The  Regimental  Reserve  depot,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant 
R.  W.  Macleod,  remained  temporarily  at  Kasr-el-Nil  barracks,  Cairo. 

At  Assioot  the  regiment  was  joined  by  "  C "  company,  under 
Captain  Napier,  and  it  at  once  left  by  river  for  Assouan,  the  head- 
quarters, "  A,"  "  B,"  "  C,"  and  "  D  "  companies  embarking  on  barges 
Nos.  151  and  182,  towed  by  the  steamer  Beherah,  and  "  E,"  "  F,"  "  G," 
and  "  H  "  companies  on  barges  Nos.  69  and  64,  towed  by  the  steamer 
Zaignet  el  Bahare. 

The  following  are  the  places  at  which  the  regiment  stopped  for  the 
night  during  its  voyage  to  Assouan  :— 

November  20th  The  Village  of  Abu  Tig 

21st  The  Village  of  Tushba 

„         22nd  Sohag 

„         23rd  The  Village  of  Masateh,  iiear  Girgeh 

24th  Esbeh 

„        25th  Keneh 

„         26th  Luxor 

„        27th  Esneh 

28th  The  Village  of  Gisr  Voardil 

29th The  Village  of  Aklit 

On  the  30th  of  November  the  regiment  reached  Assouan  (the  first 
Cataract).  Here  Colonel  Leith  received  orders  that  it  was  to  proceed 
to  Korosko  to  hold  the  desert  road  from  that  place  to  Abou-Hamad. 

On  the  1st  of  December  the  regiment  disembarked,  and  proceeded 
by  train  to  Philae  at  the  top  of  the  first  Cataract,  where  it  again 
embarked  for  Korosko. 

The  head-quarters, "F"  and  "G"  companies  embarked  on  the  steamer 
Benha,  towing  barge  No.  80 ;  "A"  and  "C  "  companies,  under  Major 
Hunt,  in  sailing  barge  No.  112;  "B"  and  "  D  "  companies,  under 
Captain  Halkett,  on  sailing  barge  No.  14  ;  "  E "  company  (Major 
Money)  on  Dahabeah  No.  103 ;  and  "  H  "  company  (Major  Chalmers) 
on  Dahabeah  No.  84, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  183 

The  sailing  boats  left  that  evening,  and  the  steamer  followed 
on  the  2nd. 

The  regiment  arrived  at  Korosko  on  the  4th  of  December  and 
bivouacked  for  the  night.  On  the  5th  the  tents  were  landed  and  a 
camp  pitched. 

Korosko  is  a  small  place,  consisting  of  a  few  mud  huts  of  the 
Ababdeh  Arabs,  and  is  important  as  being  the  northern  extremity  of 
the  desert  route  to  Abou  Hamad  and  the  point  from  which  General 
Gordon  had  entered  the  Soudan. 

Colonel  J.  M.  Leith,  C.B.,  was  now  appointed  commandant  of  the 
station  in  succession  to  Major  Rundle  of  the  Egyptian  army,  who 
was  engaged  in  raising  Arab  levies  from  the  Ababdeh  tribes,  with  a 
view  to  opening  the  desert  road  in  conjunction  with  the  Cameron 

Highlanders. 

1885. 

On  the  23rd  of  January,  1885,  a  draft  of  31  rank  and  file  reached 
Korosko  from  the  Reserve  depot  at  Cairo. 

On  the  28th  of  January  the  sad  news  of  the  fall  of  Khartoum  and  the 
death  of  the  heroic  General  Gordon  was  communicated  to  Colonel 
Leith  by  Lord  Wolseley.  The  splendid  efforts  of  the  desert  and  river 
columns  had  been  in  vain,  and  they  were  ordered  to  fall  back  upon 
Korti. 

All  anticipations  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders  crossing  to  Abou 
Hamad  and  taking  a  more  active  part  in  the  campaign  were  now 
closed,  and  the  desert  levies  under  Major  Rundle  were  disbanded. 

On  the  8th  of  February  the  following  telegram  was  received  by 
Colonel  Leith  from  Major-General  Sir  Evelyn  Wood,  V.C.,  commanding 
the  lines  of  communication  : — 

"  Your  battalion  will  spend  the  summer  at  Korosko ;  commence  at 
once  to  hut  half  a  battalion  with  a  view  to  health  and  comfort,  and 
report  progress  when  half  is  completed." 

From  this  it  became  evident  that  Lord  Wolseley's  army  would 
summer  in  the  Soudan  and  advance  upon  Khartoum  in  the  autumn. 

On  receipt  of  this  order  the  regiment  at  once  commenced  to 
construct  huts  of  mud  and  palm  branches, 


184  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

On  the  29th  of  February  Major  and  Adjutant  K.  S.  Baynes  proceeded 
to  Suakim  on  the  staff  of  Sir  Gerald  Graham,  V.C.,  K.C.B.,  who  had 
been  appointed  to  command  the  force  designed  to  co-operate  with  the 
Nile  Expedition. 

On  the  8th  of  March  a  draft  of  2  officers  (Lieutenants  Douglas- 
Hamilton  and  Hon.  Andrew  Murray)  and  30  rank  and  file  joined  the 
regiment  from  the  Nile  reserve  depot. 

On  the  31st  of  March,  to  the  great  regret  of  all  ranks,  Colonel  J.  M. 
Leith,  C.B.,  left  the  regiment  to  take  up  the  appointment  of  assistant- 
adjutant-general  of  the  Suakim  field  force.  He  was  succeeded  in 
command  by  Lieutenant-Colonel  H.  H.  St.  Leger. 

On  the  7th  of  April  Lord  Wolseley  arrived  at  Korosko  and  inspected 
the  hutting  in  progress. 

"  B,"  "  C,"  and  "  D  "  companies  occupied  huts  on  the  20th  of 
April,  and  by  the  middle  of  May  the  whole  of  the  regiment  was 
hutted. 

On  the  llth  of  May  Major  G.  L.  C.  Money  was  appointed  assistant- 
military-secretary  to  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Frederick  Stephenson, 
commanding  the  troops  in  Lower  Egypt. 

On  the  12th  small  pox  appeared  in  the  regiment,  but  prompt 
measures  were  taken  for  its  suppression  and  the  disease  did  not 
spread. 

On  the  1st  of  July  a  draft,  consisting  of  i  sergeant  and  61  reservists, 
under  Captain  Racket-Thompson,  arrived  at  Korosko  from  Fort 
George  ;  these  men  had  chiefly  come  from  the  1st,  21st,  72nd,  78th, 
and  92nd  regiments,  and  there  were  a  few  old  79th  men. 

It  had  now  been  definitely  decided  to  withdraw  the  Nile  expedition, 
and  accordingly  a  frontier  field  force,  consisting  of  the  20th  Hussars, 
West  Kent,  Stafford,  and  Yorkshire  regiments,  and  the  Cameron 
Highlanders,  was  formed,  under  the  command  of  Major-General 
F.  W.  Grenfell,  C.B.,  A.D.C.,  to  hold  the  Soudan  frontier.  This  force 
was  disposed  as  follows  :  — The  West  Kent  regiment  at  Haifa  ;  the 
Cameron  Highlanders  at  Korosko,  and  the  remainder  at  Assouan. 

For  its  services  in  the  Nile  expedition  the  regiment  received  the 
royal  authority  to  have  the  words  "Nile,  1884-85"  inscribed  on  its 
colours  and  appointments ;  Major  Everett  was  promoted  to  be 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  185 

lieutenant-colonel  in  the  army,  and  every  officer,  non-commissioned 
officer,  and  man  received  the  medal  and  "  Nile  "  clasp  (or  clasp  oaly- 
if  already  in  possession  of  the  medal). 

On  the  17th  of  July  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  Colonel  Leach, 
V.C.,  R.E.,  commanding  the  garrison  at  Korosko,  who  complimented 
all  ranks  on  having  maintained  such  a  smart  and  soldier-like  appear- 
ance under  such  disadvantageous  circumstances. 

On  the  6th  of  September  the  regiment  was  much  grieved  to  hear  of 
the  death  of  Captain  Halkett,  which  occurred  in  England.  He  had 
been  invalided  from  the  Nile  suffering  from  fever. 

On  the  29th  of  September  a  draft  consisting  of  3  subalterns 
(Lieutenants  W.  D.  Ewart,  Gordon,  and  MacFarlan),  1  sergeant,  and 
17  rank  and  file,  under  the  command  of  Major  R.  C.  Annesley,  joined 
the  regiment  from  the  Nile  reserve  depot. 

On  the  5th  of  October  a  telegram  was  received  from  Major-General 
Grenfell,  C.B.,  A.D.C.,  directing  that  the  Cameron  Highlanders  should 
be  held  in  readiness  to  proceed  to  Wady  Haifa  as  soon  as  relieved, 
in  consequence  of  intelligence  received  that  the  Soudan  Arabs  were 
advancing  upon  Akasheh  and  Wady  Haifa. 

On  the  10th  of  the  same  month  the  regiment  was  inspected  on 
parade  by  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Frederick  Stephenson,  K.C.B.,  who 
was  inspecting  the  frontier  stations.  He  complimented  the  regiment 
on  its  fine  appearance  and  excellent  conduct. 

On  the  13th  the  1st  battalion  of  the  Yorkshire  regiment  arrived  at 
Korosko  to  relieve  the  regiment ;  and  as  soon  as  the  former  had 
disembarked,  the  Cameron  Highlanders  embarked  on  three  steamers 
towing  barges.  Four  companies,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett, 
embarked  on  the  largest  of  these  steamers,  the  SS.  Messir,  and  the 
two  smaller  steamers  were  placed  respectively  in  charge  of  Lieutenants 
Cameron  and  Hon.  A.  D.  Murray. 

The  regiment  spent  the  night  of  the  14th  at  Ibrim  island,  the  15th 
at  the  temple  of  Aboo  Simbel,  and  the  16th  at  the  village  of  Eskeh. 

On  the  17th  it  arrived  at  Wady  Haifa  and  disembarked.  Here 
orders  were  received  for  the  right  half  battalion  and  head-quarters  to  go 
under  canvas,  and  for  the  left  half  battalion,  under  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Everett,  to  proceed  to  the  advanced  outposts  of  Kosheh  and  Akasheh. 


186  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

In  accordance  with  these  orders  "  G  "  and  "  H  "  companies,  under 
the  command  of  Major  Chalmers,  left  by  train  for  Akasheh  on  the 
18th  of  October.  From  Akasheh  they  marched  on  26  miles  to 
Kosheh  fort,  which  was  reached  on  the  22nd. 

Kosheh  was  a  small  brick  fort  113  miles  to  the  south  of  Wady 
Haifa,  and  was  the  most  advanced  British  post  in  the  Soudan. 

On  the  19th  of  October  "E"  and  "F"  companies,  under  the 
command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett,  went  by  train  to  Akasheh, 
where  he  assumed  command. 

On  the  28th,  100  rank  and  file  from  the  right  half  battalion  were 
sent  as  a  reinforcement  to  Akasheh,  and  50  of  them,  under  Lieutenant 
Hon.  A.  Murray,  moved  by  whale-boat  to  Kosheh  to  join  Major 
Chalmers. 

On  the  2nd  of  November  a  draft  of  2  sergeants  and  156  rank  and 
file,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant  Scott-Elliot,  arrived  at  Wady 
Haifa  from  the  depot  at  Fort  George. 

On  the  9th  of  this  month  "  D  "  company,  under  Major 
R.  C.  Annesley,  was  sent  to  Sarras,  37  railed/south  of  Haifa,  to  protect 
the  railway  to  Akasheh.  From  Sarras  a  party  was  sent  out,  under 
Lieutenant  Scott-Elliot,  in  search  of  some  marauders  who  had  been 
seen  in  the  vicinity  of  the  railway,  and  a  party  of  12  men,  under 
Sergeant  Alexander  Mackenzie,  was  placed  in  a  blockhouse  at  Mohrat 
Wells,  13  miles  from  Sarras. 

On  the  7th  of  November  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett  moved  with 
his  two  companies  from  Akasheh  to  Kosheh,  where  the  whole  of  the 
left  half  battalion  was  now  united. 

On  the  17th  of  November  a  camel  corps  was  formed  at  Wady 
Haifa ;  25  volunteers  from  the  regiment,  under  Lieutenant  Scott-Elliot, 
joined  it,  being  designated  the  "Cameron  Division  of  the  Camel  Corps." 

On  the  19th  of  November  the  head-quarters  and  right  half  battalion, 
under  Colonel  St.  Leger,  moved  to  Akasheh,  being  joined  at  Sarras  by 
"  D "  company.  They  bivouacked  for  the  night  at  Akasheh  and 
proceeded  the  following  day  by  whale-boats  to  the  Dal  Cataract,  and 
from  thence  marched  to  Firket,  eight  miles  further  on. 

On  the  21st,  in  pursuance  of  orders,  the  head-quarters  and  right 
half  battalion  moved  from  Firket  to  Mograkeh,  an  old  Arab  fort  in 


! 


v 


79TH   CAMERON   HIGHLANDERS.  187 

total  ruins,  which  Colonel  St.  Leger  had  been  directed  to  place  in  a 
state  of  defence  with  a  view  to  keeping  open  the  communications 
between  Akasheh  and  Kosheh. 

Work  was  at  once  commenced,  the  old  towers  were  loopholed,  the 
walls  cut  down,  and  rendered  defensible,  and  a  zeriba  was  made  round 
the  most  exposed  sides.  In  the  meantime  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett 
and  the  left  half  battalion  were  working  hard  at  the  defences  of 
Kosheh,  where  the  trees  were  felled,  the  ground  cleared,  and  a  large 
zeriba  constructed  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Nile. 

It  was  known  that  the  Soudanese  army  was  approaching  rapidly  and 
might  be  expected  before  Kosheh  in  a  few  days. 

On  the  25th,  Brigadier-General  Butler,  C.B.,  A.D.C.,  arrived  at 
Mograkeh,  and  directed  that  the  right  half  battalion  should  move  to 
Kosheh  at  once,  on  being  relieved  by  the  3rd  battalion  of  the  Egyptian 
army.  "  A  "  company  moved  that  afternoon  and  "  B  "  company  on 
the  following  morning,  "  C "  and  "  D "  companies  remaining  at 
Mograkeh  until  the  arrival  of  the  Egyptians. 

Early  the  following  day  news  was  received  that  a  large  body  of  the 
enemy  had  arrived  at  the  pass  of  Attab,  only  six  miles  from  Kosheh, 
and  that  an  attack  that  night  upon  the  fort  was  contemplated.  Every 
preparation  was  made,  and  the  regiment  remained  under  arms  through- 
out the  night,  but  no  attack  came  off. 

During  the  night  "  D  "  company  was  moved  from  Mograkeh,  under 
Lieutenant  D.  Davidson,  and  was  conveyed  across  the  river  to  the 
zeriba  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Nile. 

On  the  28th  the  enemy,  whose  strength  was  estimated  at  7,000  men, 
showed  in  great  force  on  the  hills  above  Amara,  displaying  many 
banners.  In  the  evening  "  C  "  company,  under  Major  Annesley, 
moved  from  Mograkeh  to  Kosheh  on  the  arrival  of  the  3rd  battalion 
of  the  Egyptian  army.  A  small  signalling  party  from  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  was  left  at  Mograkeh. 

The  garrison  of  Kosheh  now  consisted  of  1  troop  of  the  20th 
Hussars,  1  troop  of  Mounted  Infantry,  a  few  British  and  Egyptian 
Artillerymen,  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  100  men  of  the  9th 
Soudan  battalion,  under  Major  Archibald  Hunter;  150  blacks  from 
the  same  battalion,  under  Major  Borrow,  occupied  the  zeriba  on  the 


88  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

west  bank.  Mograkeh  was  held  by  the  3rd  battalion  of  the  Egyptian 
army,  under  Major  Besant,  and  some  of  the  Egyptian  Camel  Corps. 

The  armed  steamers  Lotus  and  Shaban  patrolled  the  river. 

On  the  29th  and  30th  of  November  the  mounted  troops,  under 
Lieutenant  Legge  of  the  20th  Hussars,  exchanged  shots  with  the 
enemy  near  Giniss,  and  the  Lotus  hotly  engaged  him  along  the  banks 
near  Attab.  One  Egyptian  soldier  was  killed. 

On  the  1st  of  December  information  was  received  that  a  force  of 
the  enemy  had  moved  round  to  the  rear,  had  torn  up  a  mile  of  the 
railway  between  Ambigole  and  Akasheh,  and  had  attacked  the  fortified 
post  at  Ambigole  Wells. 

On  the  3rd  of  December  the  Arabs  made  a  reconnaissance  to  within 
700  yards  of  the  fort,  but  the  garrison  did  not  open  fire,  hoping  that 
they  would  commit  themselves  to  an  attack. 

The  following  day  the  Lotus  again  moved  up  stream  and  engaged 
the  enemy  at  Giniss ;  the  Arabs  returned  her  fire  with  musketry 
and  artillery. 

In  the  evening  the  whole  of  the  mounted  troops  at  Kosheh  and 
Mograkeh  were  ordered  to  leave  immediately  for  Akasheh  to  assist  in 
protecting  the  railway. 

On  the  5th  of  December  the  enemy  advanced  on  both  banks  of  the 
river  and  occupied  a  ridge  of  sandhills  on  the  west  bank  and  the 
village  of  Absari,  which  was  about  800  yards  from  Kosheh  fort  on 
the  east  bank.  From  this  date  the  dervishes  kept  up  an  almost 
ceaseless  fire  of  artillery  and  musketry  upon  the  fort  and  zeriba, 
occasioning  many  casualties  in  the  garrison.  When  it  became  evident 
that  they  did  not  mean  to  attack  in  earnest,  but  to  harass  and  annoy 
the  garrison  with  their  fire,  internal  defences,  traverses,  magazines,  and 
covered  ways  were  constructed  to  protect  the  men  as  far  as  possible. 
The  garrison  was  also  divided  into  three  watches,  so  that  one-third  was 
always  available,  night  and  day,  to  repel  any  sudden  attack  and  to 
return  the  enemy's  incessant  fire. 

On  the  9th  "  C  "  company,  under  Major  Annesley,  with  80  blacks, 
under  Major  Hunter,  cleared  and  set  fire  to  the  village  of  Absari. 

On  the  llth  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  Captain  Hacket- 
Thompson  and  four  rank  and  file  wounded. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  189 

At  daybreak  orrthe  morning  of  the  12th  about  3,000  of  the  enemy 
suddenly  attacked  Mograkeh  fort.  Three  companies  of  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  were  paraded  at  once  to  go  to  the  assistance  of  the 
garrison,  but  their  services  were  not  required,  as  the  3rd  battalion  of 
the  Egyptian  army  repulsed  the  attack  with  heavy  loss  to  the  Arabs. 
The  Cameron  Highlanders  had  two  rank  and  file  wounded. 

On  the  16th  of  December  "F"  and  "H"  companies,  under 
Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett,  were  sent  out  at  6  a.m.  to  make  a 
demonstration  against  the  enemy  occupying  the  village  of  Absari.  As 
the  companies  approached  the  dervishes  opened  a  heavy  fire  from  the 
loopholed  houses,  which  was  vigorously  replied  to.  Lieutenant  Riach, 
with  Lance-Sergeant  Murray,  Corporal  Macrae,  and  Privates  Gray  and 
King,  moving  by  the  bank  of  the  river,  attacked  a  party  of  the  enemy 
concealed  behind  some  black  rocks  in  the  nullah  between  Kosheh 
and  Absari,  and  killed  fourteen  of  them.  In  doing  this,  Lieutenant 
Riach  had  a  very  narrow  escape,  as  a  bullet,  fired  by  a  dervish  from  the 
top  of  the  rocks,  passed  through  his  helmet,  removing  some  of  his 
hair.  Corporal  Macrae  was  wounded  in  the  hand. 

Having  advanced  close  to  the  village  the  companies  retired  again 
under  cover  of  the  guns  in  the  fort. 

In  this  reconnaissance  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  Major 
Chalmers  (severely),  Lieutenant  W.  G.  Cameron  (fatally),  and  four 
rank  and  file  wounded.  Major  Archibald  Hunter,  9th  battalion 
Egyptian  army,  was  also  very  dangerously  wounded. 

The  enemy  kept  up  a  heavy  fire  upon  the  fort  throughout  the  day, 
nine  of  his  shells  bursting  inside  the  works. 

On  the  17th  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  one  man  (Private  David 
McKenzie)  killed  and  one  man  wounded. 

To  the  great  regret  of  all  ranks  Lieutenant  W.  G.  Cameron  died  of 
his  wounds  on  the  19th,  and  the  following  regimental  order  was 
published  referring  to  his  death  :— 

"  The  Officer  Commanding  feels  sure  that  all  ranks  will  share  his 
deep  sorrow  at  the  deaths  of  Lieutenant  Cameron,  Private  McKenzie, 
and  Private  Farrington,  of  wounds ;  and  will  sympathise  with  their 
bereaved  relatives.  In  Lieutenant  Cameron,  the  Cameron  High- 


190  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

landers  have  lost  a  most  promising  and  gallant  young  officer,  whose 
zeal  and  readiness  to  perform  any  duty,  however  difficult  or  dangerous, 
will  long  be  remembered  by  all  who  have  served  with  him." 

The  fort  was  again  exposed  to  artillery  fire  on  the  morning  of  the 
20th  and  the  regiment  had  1  sergeant  (Armourer-Sergeant  H. 
Messenger)  and  2  rank  and  file  wounded. 

On  the  22nd  a  reconnaissance  was  made  by  the  mounted  troops, 
who  had  again  arrived  at  Mograkeh  from  Akasheh ;  they  were 
supported  by  "  A "  and  "  G "  companies,  under  Major  Hunt  and 
Captain  Napier. 

On  the  24th  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  1  corporal  wounded ;  on 
the  26th,  2  rank  and  file  killed  and  1  wounded ;  on  the  29th,  1  man 
killed  and  1  wounded. 

On  the  29th  of  December,  1885,  Lieutenant-General  Sir  Frederick 
Stephenson  arrived  at  Mograkeh  with  4,000  British  and  Egyptian 
troops,  and  the  investment  of  Kosheh,  which  had  lasted  31  days, 
terminated. 

The  following  morning  the  Anglo-Egyptian  force,  under  Lieutenant- 
General  Stephenson,  attacked  and  dispersed  the  dervishes  at  Giniss. 

The  Cameron  Highlanders  and  9th  Soudan  battalion  of  the 
Egyptian  army,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett, 
took  the  village  of  Absari  at  the  point  of  the  bayonet,  and  afterwards 
occupied  and  burnt  the  village  of  Giniss.  All  the  enemy's  standards, 
five  guns,  and  his  ammunition  and  nuggars  fell  into  the  hands  of  the 
British  and  Egyptians. 

In  this  engagement  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  8  rank  and  file 
wounded. 

The  regiment  bivouacked  for  the  night  at  Giniss,  and  on  the 
morning  of  the  31st  "  D "  and  "  E "  companies,  under  Captains 
Hacket-Thompson  and  Urquhart,  were  sent  to  dislodge  some 
dervishes  who  were  still  holding  out  in  some  houses  near  Kosheh  ; 
this  they  accomplished  without  loss,  returning  the  same  evening  to 
Giniss. 

The  following  is  a  complete  list  of  casualties  incurred  by  the 
regiment  in  the  defence  of  Kosheh  and  the  engagement  at  Giniss; — 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


191 


Major          N.G.Chalmers  ............  Severely  wounded 

Captain       F.  Hacket-Thompsoii         .........  Wounded 

Lieutenant  D.  Davidson      ...............  Contusion 

„  W.G.Cameron       ............  Died  of  wounds 

}  H.  Messenger    ..............  Severe  contusion 

0-**™   ...............  WoUDded 

J.Reid  .................  Wounded 

Drummer    J.  Thompson  ...         ...         ...          ...  Dangerously  wounded 

Private        T.  Farrington   ...............  Died  of  wounds 

„  J.  Howse     ..          ............  Severely  wounded 

H.  Mclntosh     ...............  Wounded 

„  D.  Mathieson         ...........  Dangerously  wounded 

„  D.Ramsay        ...............  Slightly  wounded 

.,  C.  Gray        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

„  W.  Fletcher     ...  ...          ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded 

„  E.  Drinkwater        ...         ...         ...         ...  Slightly  wounded 

j.  J.Stanley          ...  ..          ...          ...         ...  Twice  wounded 

CorDoral  }  J>  Stewart  ..............  Severely  wounded 

Private        D.  Mckenzie      ...............  Died  of  wounds 

Pioneer       W.  Anderson  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

Private        J.  McGruer        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...  Contusion 

J.  Kennedy  ...........  Killed. 

J.  McLaren       ...............  Killed 

„  C.  Hughes  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...  Dangerously  wounded 

D.Hogg  ..............  Killed 

„  W.Nathan  ...         ..  ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

.,  J.  Smith  ...         ...         ..          ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

„  W.  Foulks   ...         ..  ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded 

,,  J.  Charters        ...         ...         ...         ...          .,  Severely  wounded 

„  J.  McShane  ...         ...         ...         ...  Severely  wounded 

,,  J.  Redfern         ...          ...         ...         ...          ...  Slightly  wounded 

„  T.  Harris      ...          ...         ...          ...  ..  Slightly  wounded 

„  D.Lowe  ...          ...         ...         ...          ...  Severely  wounded 

Piper  J.  McDonald  ............  Died  of  fever 

Private        J.Stevenson     ......          ........  Died  of  wounds 

There  were  also  many  casualties  in  the  9th  battalion  of  the  Egyptian 
army,  and  amongst  the  natives  employed  in  the  fort. 

1886. 


On  the  1st  of  January  the  cavalry  pursued  the  dervishes  as  far  as 


192  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Absarat,  and  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  forming  part  of  the  2nd 
brigade,  under  Brigadier-General  Huyshe  C.B.,  advanced  to  Abri, 
fourteen  miles  beyond  Kosheh.  Here  Sir  Frederick  Stephenson's 
force  bivouacked  for  four  days,  waiting  for  orders  from  the  British 
Government. 

On  the  7th,  all  intention  of  re-occupying  Dongola  having  been 
abandoned,  the  army  returned  to  Kosheh,  and  on  the  8th  the 
Cameron  Highlanders,  having  handed  over  the  fort  and  works  to 
the  106th  Durham  Light  Infantry,  resumed  their  march  towards 
Akasheh. 

The  regiment  bivouacked  on  the  night  of  the  8th  at  Sarkamatto, 
and  on  the  morning  of  the  9th  marched  to  the  north  end  of  Dal 
Cataract,  where  they  embarked  for  Akasheh  in  whale-boats. 

On  the  llth  of  January  the  left  half  battalion,  under  the  command 
of  Major  R.  C.  Annesley,  moved  by  train  from  Akasheh  to  Wady 
Haifa,  being  followed  the  next  day  by  the  head-quarters  and  right  half 
battalion. 

At  Wady  Haifa  the  regiment  was  met  by  a  draft  of  3  officers 
(Lieutenants  C.  Davidson,  Findlay,  and  Lumsden),  1  sergeant,  and 
194  rank  and  file,  and — after  bivouacking  for  two  nights — it  moved 
into  the  mud  huts  recently  occupied  by  the  South  Staffordshire 
regiment. 

For  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  frontier  field  force,  those  officers, 
non-commissioned  officers,  and  men,  not  already  in  possession  of  it, 
received  the  Egyptian  war  medal.  Colonel  St.  Leger,  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Everett,  and  Major  Money  were  mentioned  in  Sir  Frederick 
Stephenson's  despatches  and  received  the  Distinguished  Service  order, 
and  Sergeant-Major  J.  Emslie  and  Sergeant  I.  Healy  (sergeant-major 
of  the  9th  Soudan  battalion)  were  awarded  the  silver  medal  for 
distinguished  conduct  in  the  field. 

The  4th  class  of  the  order  of  the  Osmanieh  was  conferred  upon 
Majors  N.  G.  Chalmers  and  Money  by  His  Highness  the  Khedive. 

The  following  officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  men  were 
brought  favourably  to  the  notice  of  the  general  officer  commanding 
by  Colonels  St.  Leger  and  Everett  in  their  official  reports  ;— 


'9TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  193 


Major  R  C.  Annesley 
Major  N.  G.  Chalmers 
Captain  R.  F.  L.  Napier 
Lieutenant  D.  Davidson 
Lieutenant  M.  S.  Riach 
Quarter-Master  Howard 
Lieutenant  and  Adjutant  J.  S.  Ewart 
Rev.  J.  Robertson 
Sergeant-Major  J.  Emslie 
Colour-Sergeant  James  Morton 
Colour-Sergeant  James  Keys 
Colour-Sergeant  James  McNeil 


Colour-Sergeant  Ilott 
Armourer-Sergeant  Henry  Messenger 
Lance-Sergeant  William  Murray 
Corporal  Peter  Binnie 
Corporal  James  Melville 
Lance- Corporal  Colin  Hutchison 
Lance-Corporal    John   Wakelen 
Lance-Corporal  David  Macrae 
Private  Joseph  Stevenson  (died  of  wounds) 
Private  Thomas  Gray 
Private  Robert  King 
Private  John  Reilly 


On  the  12th  of  February  the  regiment  was  inspected  by  Brigadier- 
General  Butler,  C.B.,  A.D.C.,  who  expressed  himself  much  pleased 
with  its  efficient  state. 

On  the  4th  of  April  orders  were  received  for  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  to  be  held  in  readiness  to  proceed  to  Cairo,  as  the  British 
Government  had  decided  to  hand  over  Wady  Haifa  to  the  Egyptian 
authorities,  and  to  withdraw  all  British  troops  to  Assouan  and  Cairo. 

On  the  9th  of  April  the  right  half  battalion,  under  the  command  of 
Captain  T.  A.  Mackenzie,  left  for  Assouan  in  the  stern  wheelers  Okmeh^ 
Waterlily,  and  Amara,  and,  on  the  return  of  these  steamers  to  Wady 
Haifa,  the  head-quarters  and  left  half  battalion  embarked. 

On  the  23rd  of  April  the  left  half  battalion  joined  the  right  at 
Assouan,  and  the  whole  regiment  went  under  canvas,  with  the  excep- 
tion of  "  E  "  company,  which  proceeded  on  detachment  to  Assioot, 
under  Captain  Mackenzie.  The  most  intense  heat  prevailed  whilst 
the  regiment  was  at  Assouan,  and  several  deaths  occurred. 

On  the  27th  of  April  the  regiment  embarked  for  Cairo  on  board 
the  SS.  Mahmoudieh,  towing  two  large  troop  barges.  "  C  "  company, 
under  Major  Annesley,  remained  behind  for  a  few  days  to  bring  on 
the  officers'  horses.  The  following  officers  embarked  with  the 
regiment : — 

Lieutenant-Colonel  Everett ;  Major  Annesley ;  Captain  Hacket- 
Thompson ;  Lieutenants  Findlay,  Douglas-Hamilton,  Hon.  A.  D. 
Murray,  W.  D.  Ewart,  Gordon,  Lumsden,  Hon.  J.  Forbes-Sempill ; 
Lieutenant  and  Adjutant  J.  S.  Ewart;  Quarter-Master  Howard; 

o 


194  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

Paymaster,    Captain    Nettleship  and    Rev.    J.    Robertson;    Warrant 
Officers,  Sergeant-Major  J.  Emslie  and  Bandmaster  Wakelen. 

During  the  voyage,  halts  for  the  night  were  made  at  Gebel  Silsileh 
on  the  27th,  at  Salaayeh  on  the  28th,  at  the  village  of  Kamuleh  on 
the  29th,  at  Deshneh  on  the  30th,  at  Betianeh  on  the  1st  of  May, 
and  at  Sohag  on  the  2nd  of  May. 

On  the  3rd  of  May  the  Cameron  Highlanders  disembarked  at 
Assioot,  and  proceeded  the  same  night  to  Cairo  by  train,  where  they 
occupied  the  Kasr-el-Nil  barracks,  recently  vacated  by  the  42nd 
Royal  Highlanders. 

On  arrival  the  regiment  was  joined  by  a  draft  of  1  corporal  and  51 
rank  and  file,  under  the  command  of  Lieutenant  Forbes. 

"  F  "  and  "  G "  companies  were  at  once  sent  on  detachment  to 
Abdin  barracks,  as  there  was  not  sufficient  accommodation  in  Kasr- 
el-Nil  for  the  whole  regiment. 

On  the  27th  of  May  the  Cameron  Highlanders  presented  a  standard 
on  parade  to  the  9th  Soudan  battalion  of  the  Egyptian  Army,  in 
recollection  of  the  association  of  the  two  regiments  in  the  defence  of 
Kosheh.  The  standard  was  first  trooped  by  the  regiment,  and  it  was 
then  handed  over  by  the  Commanding  Officer  to  a  Guard  of  Honour 
of  the  9th  battalion.  The  whole  of  the  Egyptian  troops  composing 
the  Cairo  garrison  were  present  at  this  interesting  ceremony,  which 
took  place  in  Abdin  Square. 

On  the  16th  of  June  a  party  of  invalids  of  the  regiment,  under 
Lieutenant  Wolrige  Gordon,  proceeded  to  Cyprus  for  change  of  air. 

On  the  13th  of  July  "  F"  Company,  under  the  command  of  Major 
Smith,  proceeded  to  Assioot  to  relieve  "  E  "  company,  which  returned 
to  Cairo.  "  F  "  company  remained  at  this  station  until  relieved  by 
"G  "  company,  under  Captain  Napier,  on  the  19th  of  October. 

During  the  month  of  July  the  regimental  depot  was  moved  from  Fort 
George  to  Inverness,  where  the  new  barracks  were  now  completed. 

On  the  16th  of  October  the  Abdin  detachment,  under  Brevet- 
Major  Hunt,  re-joined  head -quarters  at  Kasr-el-Nil. 

On  the  25th  of  November  the  regiment  moved  from  Kasr-el-Nil  to 
the  Citadel,  where  it  was  joined  by  the  company  from  Assioot. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  195 

Whilst  at  the  Citadel  it  was  inspected  by  Major-General  Hales  Wilkie, 
commanding  the  Cairo  brigade,  who  was  much  pleased  with  the  smart 
appearance  of  the  battalion  on  parade,  and  with  the  cleanliness  and 
neatness  of  the  barrack  rooms. 

On  the  7th  of  December  it  marched  from  the  Citadel  to  the  camp 
at  Abassiyeh  for  the  annual  course  of  musketry,  leaving  "  E " 
company  (Captain  Racket-Thompson)  in  charge  of  the  barracks  and 
regimental  baggage. 

"  E  "  company  moved  into  camp  on  the  24th  of  December,  on 
being  relieved  by  "  A  "  company  under  Major  Hunt. 

1887. 

On  the  24th  of  January  the  Cameron  Highlanders  had  the  honour 
of  being  reviewed  by  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Naples,  the 
eldest  son  of  the  King  of  Italy  (who  was  accompanied  by  Sir 
Frederick  Stephenson  and  Staff,  and  many  Foreign  Officers).  After 
the  parade  His  Royal  Highness  visited  the  camp  and  the  officers'  mess 
tent ;  he  expressed  himself  highly  pleased  with  all  he  saw. 

The  regiment  returned  to  the  Citadel  on  the  2nd  of  February  on 
the  completion  of  the  annual  course  of  musketry,  and  occupied  its 
original  quarters. 

Whilst  the  regiment  was  at  Abassiyeh  Sergeant-Major  John  Emslie 
was  presented,  on  a  parade  of  all  the  troops  in  Cairo,  with  the  silver 
medal  for  "  Distinguished  Conduct  in  the  Field,"  conferred  upon  him 
for  his  gallant  behaviour  at  the  defence  of  Kosheh. 

On  the  9th  of  February  His  Royal  Highness  the  Prince  of  Naples 
again  honoured  the  officers  of  the  regiment  with  his  presence  at  an 
"  At  Home  "  given  by  them  in  the  Bijou  Palace.  He  remained  for 
some  time,  and  appeared  to  take  great  interest  in  the  sword  dance 
and  a  reel  which  were  performed  by  Pipe-Major  W.  McDonald 
and  Pipers  D.  Campbell,  Sharp,  and  Alan  McKenzie,  in  the  large 
reception  room  of  the  Palace. 

On  the  4th  of  March  the  regiment  received  orders  to  be  ready  to 
embark  for  England  at  short  notice,  and  on  the  llth  of  March  it  left 
Cairo  by  train  for  Alexandria, 


19b  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

Amongst  the  many  friends  who  came  to  the  station  to  say  farewell 
to  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  His  Excellency  Tonino  Pasha, 
representing  His  Highness  the  Khedive,  and  the  Italian  military 
attache,  who  attended  to  mark  the  regard  felt  for  the  regiment  by  the 
Italian  community.  The  same  evening  the  regiment  embarked,  after 
a  stay  of  four-and-a-half  years  in  Egypt,  on  board  H.M.S.  Tamar 
and  sailed  at  once  for  Malta.  The  following  officers  embarked  with 
it  :  — 

Colonel  St.  Leger,  D.S.O.,  (commanding) ;  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Everett,  D.S.O.  ;  Colonel  McCausland  ;  Major  Hunt  ;  Captains 
Napier,  Hacket-Thompson,  Mackenzie,  Urquhart,  and  D.  Davidson  ; 
Lieutenants  Macleod,  C.  Davidson,  Scott-Elliot,  Riach,  Findlay, 
McKerrell,  Douglas-Hamilton,  Hon.  A.  Murray,  W.  D.  Ewart, 
Gordon,  MacFarlan,  Lumsden,  Hon.  J.  Forbes-Sempill  (Master  of 
Sempill),  and  Egerton ;  Quarter-Master  Howard ;  Lieutenant  and 
Adjutant  J.  S.  Ewart ;  and  Captain  Nettleship  (paymaster) ;  Warrant 
Officers,  Sergeant-Major  J.  Emslie,  Bandmaster  R.  B.  Wakelen. 

Before  the  departure  of  the  regiment  His  Highness  the  Khedive 
conferred  the  3rd  class  of  the  order  of  the  Medjidie  upon  Lieutenant- 
Colonel  Everett,  D.S.O.,  the  4th  class  upon  Captain  Napier,  and  the 
5th  class  upon  Lieutenant  and  Adjutant  Ewart  in  recognition  of  their 
services  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

The  regiment  landed  at  Devonport  (Millbay  Pier)  on  the  26th  of 
March,  1887,  and  occupied  the  South  Raglan  barracks.  On  the  1st 
of  April  a  draft  from  the  depot  at  Inverness,  consisting  of  1  subaltern 
(Lieutenant  Scott),  2  sergeants,  and  199  rank  and  file,  under  the 
command  of  Major  A.  Y.  Leslie,  joined  the  head-quarters  at 
Devonport. 

In  the  beginning  of  May  Sergeant  Thomas  Healy  of  the  regiment, 
who  had  been  acting  as  Sergeant-Major  of  the  9th  Soudan  battalion 
of  the  Egyptian  army,  in  which  capacity  he  had  won  the  Silver  Medal 
for  distinguished  conduct  in  the  field  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss, 
again  greatly  distinguished  himself  in  the  hand-to-hand  fight  with  the 
dervishes  at  Sarras  on  the  Soudan  frontier. 

On   this   occasion   he  killed  the   celebrated  dervish  leader   Nur 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 

Hamza,  and  gained  possession  of  his  sword  and  spear,  receiving  five 
wounds  himself  in  the  course  of  the  action. 

Shortly  after  the  arrival  of  the  regiment  in  England  it  became 
known  that  it  was  in  contemplation  to  convert  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  into  a  3rd  battalion  of  the  Scots  Guards. 

As  such  a  proposal  was  tantamount  to  a  total  extinction  of  the 
regiment,  and  the  loss  of  its  character  as  a  Highland  corps,  the  news 
was  received  with  the  greatest  consternation  by  all  ranks,  and  much 
indignation  was  felt  and  expressed  in  the  town  and  county  of  Inver- 
ness and  in  the  Highlands  generally. 

Meetings  protesting  against  the  scheme  were  at  once  held  by  the 
Highland  Society  of  London,  the  Town  Council  of  Inverness,  the 
Inverness  Commissioners  of  Supply,  and  other  influential  bodies,  with 
the  result  that,  on  the  17th  of  May,  Lord  Lovat  was  authorised  by  the 
Secretary  of  State  for  War  to  state  that  the  proposed  change  would 
not  take  place,  and  that  the  question  was  as  dead  as  if  it  had  never 
been  mooted. 

Amongst  the  many  friends  of  the  regiment  who  on  this  occasion 
exerted  themselves  to  avert  what  was  regarded  by  all  interested  in  the 
Highland  regiments  as  a  calamity,  may  be  mentioned  : — 

The  Marquis  of  Lome,  Lord  Lovat,  Lord  Archibald  Campbell,  Mr. 
Cameron  of  Lochiel,  the  Mackintosh  of  Mackintosh,  Mr.  Forbes  of 
Culloden,  Mr.  Grant  of  Glenmoriston,  Mr.  Davidson  of  Cantray,  Mr. 
Macleod  of  Cadboll,  Hon.  Ivan  Campbell,  Mr.  Macandrew,  Provost 
of  Inverness,  Colonel  Lumsden,  Major  Grant,  Drumbuie,  Major 
Kenneth  Macleay,  and  almost  every  one  connected  with  the  district 
to  which  the  regiment  belongs. 

On  the  14th  of  June  the  regiment  furnished  a  Guard  of  Honour, 
under  Captain  Napier,  consisting  of  the  band,  pipers,  and  100  rank 
and  file,  with  the  Queen's  colour,  to  receive  the  Crown  Prince  and 
Princess  of  Portugal  on  landing  at  Devonport. 

During  this  month  the  feelings  of  goodwill  and  cordiality  prevailing 
between  the  two  battalions  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders  were  shown 
in  a  marked  manner  by  the  officers  making  each  other  perpetual 
honorary  members  of  their  respective  messes. 

In  the  month  of  July  the  regiment  took  part  in  the  Jubilee  Review 


198  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

at  Aldershot,  when  60,000  men  marched  past  Her  Majesty  the  Queen. 

The  regiment  embarked  at  Devonport  on  the  6th  of  July  on  board 
H.M.S.  Tamar,  756  strong  of  all  ranks,  and  proceeded  to 
Portsmouth,  where  it  landed  and  moved  by  train  to  Aldershot.  At 
Aldershot  it  went  under  canvas  on  Church  Plateau,  in  the  North 
Camp,  forming  part  of  the  5th  brigade  of  the  3rd  division. 

The  regiment  was  the  only  Highland  regiment  present  at  the 
review  in  the  Long  Valley  on  the  9th  of  July,  and  its  appearance 
elicited  the  loudest  applause  from  the  enormous  crowds  present  to  see 
the  march  past.  It  returned  to  Portsmouth  on  the  llth  of  July,  and 
re-embarked  on  board  H.M.S.  Tamar',  the  next  day  it  disembarked 
at  Devonport  and  re-occupied  its  quarters  in  Raglan  barracks. 

On  the  16th  of  July  Colonel  St.  Leger,  D.S.O.,  retired  from  the 
command  of  the  regiment,  being  succeeded  by  Lieutenant-Colonel 
Everett,  D.S.O. 

"  A "  company  (Major  Hunt)  and  "  B  "  company  (Captain  Mac- 
kenzie) went  on  detachment  to  Fort  Staddon  on  the  13th  of  July  to 
commence  the  annual  course  of  musketry. 


SUCCESSION    OF    COLONELS    OF    THE    79iH    CAMERON 
HIGHLANDERS  FROM   1793  TO  1887. 

Major  Alan  Cameron        -         -       August  17th,  1793     -    Died  March  9th,  1828. 
^^l^^^84*^    1828  »     April  10th,  1841. 

H<HM>Ura*  le  J>  }   April  27th,      1841     -        „     June  28th,  1842. 


Lieutenant-General  Sir  James  \  Ti]1,lf,         1ftJ  ,to    71st 

-MT     j         11   tr  n  -R  f  July  14th,       1842       -J  Highlanders, 

Macdonnell,  KC.B.  |   February  8th,  1849. 

Major-General  James  Hay,  C.B.  Feb.  8th,        1849     -     Died  Feb.  25th,   1854. 

Lieutenant  -General     W.      H.  \  Mftrch  24th     1854     .  1862> 

Sewell,  U.r>.  -         -         -  J 

GSLu0TBabl!HU?A^}  March  14th,    1862     -        „  1868. 

General  J.  P.  Glencairn  Camp-  \  July  mh)       186g     ,        ^  mo> 

Major-  General  Henry  Cooper,!  Augugt  21stj  1870 

v»  JL>.  •  •  '  J 

G  neral   Sir    Alfred   Horsford,  "I  March  ^^    1876       /Transferred     to     the 

General  Sir  John  Douglas,  G.C  B.  January  1st,   1879 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


199 


1st  Batt. 


2nd    „ 

>»       j> 
1st      „ 


2nd  „ 

1st  „ 

2nd  „ 

1st  „ 

2nd  „ 

1st  „ 

2nd  „ 
1st 


2nd 
1st 


SUCCESSION   OF  LIEUTENANT-COLONELS   OF  THE 
79TH   CAMERON  HIGHLANDERS. 

Alan  Cameron    - 
Honourable  A.  C.  « 
William  Ashton 
Patrick  Macdowall 
William  Eden     - 
Archibald  McLean 
Philips  Cameron 
John  Murray 
Philips  Cameron 
John  Murray 
Robert  Fulton 
Robert  Fulton 
William  Harvey 
William  Harvey 
Neil  Douuglas    - 
Neil  Douglas 
Nathaniel  Cameron    - 
Duncan  MacDougall 
Robert  Ferguson 
Andrew  Brown 
John  Carter,  K.H. 
Honourable  Laude 
Edmund  James  Elliot 
John  Douglas 
Richard  C.  H. 
Thomas  Bromhead  Butt 
William  C.  Hodgson 
Richard  M.  Best 
Keith  Ramsay  Maitland 
George  Murray  Miller 
Edward  W.  Cuming 
John  Macdonald  Leith 
Simon,  Lord  Lovat,  A. 
Henry  Hungerford  St, 
Edward  Everett,  D.S.O. 


-     17th  August, 

1793. 

Fohnstone                      -         2nd  May, 

1794. 

-     18th  September, 

1794. 

1st  November, 

1796. 

15th  August, 

1798. 

3rd  September, 

1801. 

.     19th  April, 

1804. 

28th  May, 

1807. 

-     llth  December, 

1806. 

28th  May, 

1807. 

28th  May; 

1807. 

13th  May, 

1811, 

30th  May, 

1811. 

3rd  December, 

1812. 

3rd  December, 

1812. 

20th  February, 

1813. 

Q    24th  June, 

1813. 

ill                                            6th  September, 

1833. 

13th  March, 

1835. 

1841. 

29th  October, 

1841. 

srdale  Maule         -         -          14th  June, 

1842. 

Lliot         ....     24th  December, 

1852. 

13th  August, 

1854. 

dor,  C.B.          -        -         -     1st  August, 

1857. 

1  Butt          -         -         -         15th  April, 

1859. 

on            -         -         -         -     10th  July, 

1860. 

13th  September, 

1864. 

itland      -        -         -         -     2nd  March, 

1872. 

iller     -         -         -        -         19th  October, 

1872. 

ng   6th  August, 

1879. 

Leith                                        let  July, 

1881. 

it,  A.D.C.                   -        -     1st  July, 

1881. 

d  St,  Leger                               1st  April, 

1885. 

D.S.O.      ....     1st  July, 

1887. 

200 


HISTORICAL  RECORDS,  ETC. 


The  following  officers  were  serving  in  the  regiment  when  these 
records  were  completed  : — 

IST  BATTALION. 

Lic£;r>  ^erett,  D.S.O. 
Colonel 
Major 


W.  H.  McCausland 
A.  Y.  Leslie 
„  0=  B.  Gordon 

„  N.  G.  Chalmers 

„  G.  L.  C.  Money,  D.S.O. 

W.  H.  Smith 
„  J.  M.  Hunt 

Captain  F.  S.  Chapman 

„  K.  S.  Baynes  (Bt. -Major) 

R.  F.  L.  Napier 

„  F.  Bucket-Thompson 

„  T.  A.  Mackenzie 

H.  H.  L.  Malcolm 
„  B.  C,  Urquhart 

„  D.  F.  Davidson 

Lieutenant       R.  W.  Macleod 
„  C.  F.  H.  Davidson 

„  G.  E.  Forbes 

„  A.  Scott-Elliot 

G.  R.  Cavaye 
M.  S.  Riach 
„  C.  Findlay 

A.  de  S.  McKerrell 
„  A.  F.  Douglas-Hamilton 

„  Hon.  A.  D.  Murray 

W.  D.  Ewart 
H.  G.  Wolrige- Gordon 
F.  A.  MacFarlan 
„  H.  R.  Lunisden 

.,  Hon.  J.  Forbes- Sempill 

(Master  of  Sempill) 
A.  F.  Egerton 

Adjutant          J.  S.  Ewart  (Lieutenant) 
Paymaster        A.  J.  Nettleship  (Captain) 
Quarter-Master  W.  Howard  (Lieutenant) 
Sergeant-Major  W.  Young 

„  H.  McLean  (Depot) 

Bandmaster     11.  B.  B.  Wakeleu 


Colonel 
Major 


Captain 


Lieutenant 


2ND  BATTALION. 

S.  Lord  Lovat,  A.D.C. 

J.  A.  Macdonald 

G.  A.  Duff 

G.  R.  McKessack 

H.  L.  Langford  Brooke 

(Hon.  Major) 
A.    D.    Mackintosh    of 
Mackintosh        (Hon. 
Major) 
C.  J.  Merry 
H.  W.  Kemble 
W.  H.  Garforth 
W.  G.  S.  Menzies 
C.  L.  McKeuzie 
I.  R.  J.  M.  Grant 
C.  Aytoun 
R.  A.  Patersou 
J.  W.  MacGillivray 
H.  E.  Boulton 
A.  J.  Campbell-Orde 
C.  D.  Stewart 
E.  J.  Stourton 
J.  H.  F.  Radcliffe 
J.  H.  Younger 
J.  McDonald 
W.  R.  D.  Mackenzie 
JO.  J.  F.  Potts- Chatto 
K.  A.  Fraser 
K.  S.  Baynes  (Bt. -Major) 
Quarter- Master  J.  Emslie  (Lieutenant) 
Medical  Officer  D.  McFadyen  (Surgeon- 
Major) 
Sergeant-Major  A.  D.  Fraser 


2nd 
Lieutenant 

55 

Adjutant 


SERVICES  OF  THE  OFFICERS. 

Compiled  from   the  Annual  Army  Lists   and  other 
authentic  sources. 


I 


ACKLAND.  Robert  Innes  Ackland.  Ensign,  17th  of  August,  1809: 
he  was  placed  on  half  pay  of  the  regiment  in  September,  1814; 
afterwards  served  in  the  72nd  regiment.  He  was  present  with 
the  79th  at  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and  the  Pyrenees. 

ADCOCK.  Herbert  Burrows  Adcock.  Ensign,  2nd  of  March,  1855  ; 
lieutenant,  17th  of  February,  1857  ;  exchanged  to  6th  Foot, 
1857. 

ADDERLEY.  Randolph  Ralph  Adderley.  Exchanged  as  ensign  to 
79th  from  35th  regiment,  21st  of  May,  1850. 

ALLEN.  John  Edward  Allen.  Was  transferred  to  the  79th,  as  lieu- 
tenant, from  the  92nd  Highlanders,  19th  of  January,  1855. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Crimea  from  the 
16th  of  August,  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol, 
and  assault  of  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with  clasp  and 
Turkish  medal.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  attack  on  the  fort 
at  Rooyah,  actions  at  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  Shahjehanpore, 
capture  of  forts  Bunniar  and  Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra 
at  Fyzabad,  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia,  and  subsequent 
operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Exchanged  as  major  to  the  71st  Highland 
Light  Infantry. 

ALLEYNE.  Douglas  Alleyne.  Ensign,  23rd  of  February,  1855, 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Crimea  from  the  16th 


204  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

of  August  until  December,  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of 
Sebastopol,  and  assault  on  the  Redan  on  the  8th  of  September. 
(Medal  with  clasp  and  Turkish  medal.)  Served  also  with  the 
79th  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  affair 
of  Secundragunge  near  Allahabad,  siege  and  capture  of 
Lucknow,  attack  on  the  fort  of  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge, 
Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  forts  Bunniar  and 
Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  acted  as 
adjutant  at  the  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia,  and  during  the 
subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee 
rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Exchanged  to  the  37th  Foot  on 
the  27th  of  June,  1860;  retired  as  lieutenant-colonel. 

ANDERSON.  Allan  Meyrick  Anderson.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
25th  of  April,  1885. 

ANDERSON.  Andrew  Anderson,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon 
in  the  79th  on  the  4th  of  February,  1808  ;  was  present  with 
the  79th  at  the  battles  of  Busaco  and  Fuentes  d'Onor ;  was 
transferred  to  the  61st  regiment  on  the  25th  of  June,  1812,  and 
was  present  at  the  battles  of  Salamanca  and  Pyrenees  (silver 
medal  with  clasp),  and  at  the  siege  of  Burgos. 

ANDERSON.  John  Anderson,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  in 
the  79th  on  the  8th  of  May,  1840;  transferred  to  the  22nd 
regiment  in  the  same  year.  Died  at  sea.  Served  with  the 
22nd  regiment  at  the  battle  of  Meeanee.  (Medal.) 

ANDERSON.  William  Anderson.  Ensign,  22nd  of  October,  1799; 
placed  on  half  pay,  1802.  Afterwards  served  in  the  78th 
Highlanders. 

ANGUS.  John  Angus.  Ensign,  1st  of  March,  1864;  lieutenant,  8th 
of  February,  1868  ;  instructor  of  musketry,  4th  of  May,  1873. 
Exchanged  to  the  7th  Fusiliers  on  the  27th  of  August,  1873. 
Served  as  paymaster  of  the  4th  battalion  Rifle  Brigade  in  the 
Afghan  war,  in  1878-79.  (Medal.) 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  205 

ANNESLEY.  Reginald  Carey  Annesley.  Ensign,  15th  of  January, 
1864;  lieutenant,  29th  of  January,  1867.  Served  throughout 
Ashantee  campaign,  attached  to  the  42nd  Black  Watch  in 
1873-74  ;  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Amoaful  (slightly  wounded), 
the  capture  and  destruction  of  Becquah,  battle  of  Ordahsu,  and 
capture  of  Coomassie.  (Medal  and  clasp.)  Also  served 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force, 
1885-86,  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  ;  was  present  in  Kosheh 
during  its  investment  by  the  Arabs,  and  at  the  engagement  at 
Giniss.  (Medal.)  Retired  in  1886  with  the  honorary  rank  of 
lieutenant-colonel. 

ANYSLEY.  James  Murray  Anysley.  Ensign,  21st  of  October,  1799  ; 
placed  on  half  pay,  1802  ;  captain,  26th  of  June,  1846.  Retired, 
27th  of  October,  1848. 

ARBUTHNOTT.  Honourable  Sir  Hugh  Arbuthnott,  K.C.B.  General, 
20th  of  June,  1854;  colonel  of  the  79th,  14th  of  March,  1862. 
He  served  in  the  campaign  in  Holland  in  1799,  at  the  bombard- 
ment of  Copenhagen  in  1801  and  1807,  with  the  expedition  to 
Sweden  in  1808,  and  throughout  the  Peninsular  war.  He 
received  a  gold  medal  for  Busaco,  and  a  silver  medal  with  two 
clasps  for  Corunna  and  Fuentes  d'Onor.  He  died  in  1868. 

ARBUTHNOTT.  Thomas  H.  C.  Arbuthnott.  Ensign,  10th  of  February, 
1843.  Retired,  6th  of  June,  1845. 

ARCHER.  Anthony  Archer.  A  volunteer  from  the  94th  regiment; 
ensign,  14th  of  October,  1812.  Died  the  same  year. 

ARTHUR.  Rev.  David  Arthur.  Was  chaplain  to  the  79th  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp, 
and  Khedive's  star.)  Was  also  with  the  regiment  during  the 
Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 

ASHTON.  William  Ashton.  Lieutenant-colonel,  18th  of  September, 
1794.  Died  in  1797, 


206  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

ASSIOTTI.  Francis  Assiotti.  Exchanged  from  the  45th  regiment ; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  March,  1805;  went  to  the  27th  regiment  as 
captain,  15th  of  May,  1806. 

ATKINSON.  Agit  Atkinson.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  of  the  79th 
from  the  Aberdeen  Fencibles  on  the  14th  of  May,  1803. 
Served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  drowned  in  the 
river  Douro. 

AYTOUN.  Chadwick  Aytoun.  Lieutenant  in  the  2nd  battalion,  1st 
of  July,  1881. 

AYTOUN.  Robinson  Aytoun.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  of  the 
79th,  1st  of  May,  1806;  transferred  to  the  13th  Foot  on  the 
4th  of  February,  1808.  Had  a  medal  for  Martinique. 

BAILEY.  David  Bailey.  Ensign,  llth  of  July,  1811.  Died  at  Elvas, 
August,  1811,  of  a  wound  received  at  the  battle  of  Albuhera. 

BAILLIE.  Alexander  Peter  Baillie.  Ensign,  14th  of  August,  1857 ; 
lieutenant,  4th  of  September,  1860;  captain,  llth  of  June, 
1867;  half  pay,  10th  of  April,  1869. 

BAILLIE.  Matthew  Baillie,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  in 
the  79th,  18th  of  January,  1827.  Died  at  Belfast  on  the  6th 
of  February,  1828. 

BALDOCK.  John  Baldock.  Paymaster,  21st  of  July,  1798.  Died  in 
the  Walcheren  expedition  in  1809. 

BALFOUR.  Jeremiah  Balfour.  Ensign,  1st  of  October,  1812  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 19th  of  May,  1814;  placed  on  half  pay  of  the  regiment, 
25th  of  March,  1817.  Died  at  Chatham  on  the  20th  of 
September,  1822. 

BALFOUR.  William  Balfour.  Lieutenant  in  the  79th  from  half 
pay,  26th  of  July,  1839;  retired  on  the  14th  of  October,  1842. 

BANKES.  William  Meyrick  Bankes,  younger,  of  Letterewe.  Major, 
2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Died  in  1884. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  207 

BARNES.  Sir  Edward  Barnes,  G.C.B.  Exchanged  as  lieutenant- 
colonel  to  the  79th  from  the  99th  regiment,  17th  of  JanuaryL 

1800,  and  was  appointed  to  the  46th  regiment  on  the  23rd  of 
April,    1807;    major-general,    4th   of  June,  1813;    lieutenant- 
general,    27th   of  May,    1825;    general,   7th   of  June,    1831; 
colonel   of  the    31st   regiment,    10th   of  October,   1834.     Sir 
Edward  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  in 

1801.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).    Was  present  at 
the  captures  of  Martinique,  Guadaloupe,   battles   of  Vittoria, 
Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Orthes.     (Gold  medal).     He  was 
adjutant-general  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo,  where  he  was  very 
severely  wounded.     He  died  in  London  on  the  31st  of  August, 
1848. 

BARNEWELL.  Bartholemew  Barnewell.  Lieutenant  in  the  79th, 
22nd  of  October,  1799.  Retired  on  half  pay  of  the  regiment, 
1800.  Died  on  the  31st  of  August,  1848. 

BARWICK.  James  Barwick.  Lieutenant,  26th  of  January,  1804; 
exchanged  to  the  14th  Foot;  became  a  major  in  1830,  and 
died  in  Canada. 

BATEMAN.  Robert  Bateman.  Exchanged  to  79th  as  paymaster, 
25th  of  April,  1824;  went  on  half  pay  on  the  16th  of  February, 
1829.  Had  previously  served  in  Hanover  in  1805,  and  was 
shipwrecked  and  made  prisoner  in  the  Texel.  He  was  present 
at  the  attack  on  Buenos  Ayres ;  served  in  the  Peninsula,  and 
was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Vittoria ;  was  also  at  the 
battle  of  Plattsburg,  in  America,  in  1814. 

BAYNES.  Kenneth  Schalch  Baynes.  Lieutenant,  10th  of  September, 
1876.  Served  as  adjutant  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's 
star.)  Served  with  the  expedition  to  the  Soudan  in  1884,  as 
assistant-military-secretary  to  Sir  Gerald  Graham,  and  was 


208  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

present  in  the  engagements  at  El  Teb  and  Tamaii.  (Brought 
home  the  despatches,  mentioned  in  despatches,  brevet  of 
major,  two  clasps.)  Served  in  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85 
as  adjutant  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  staff  officer  at 
Korosko.  (Clasp.)  He  also  served  in  the  campaign  in  the 
eastern  Soudan  in  1885  as  deputy-assistant-adjutant  and  quarter- 
master-general, and  was  present  in  the  engagement  at  Hasheen 
and  at  the  destruction  of  Tamaii.  (Mentioned  in  despatches, 
clasp.) 

BEATTIE.  James  Forbes  Beattie.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  to  the 
79th  Highlanders,  20th  of  September,  1864.  Transferred  to  the 
Army  Medical  Staff,  16th  of  December,  1871. 

BEATTIE.  George  Beattie,  M.D.  Appointed  surgeon  of  the  79th, 
1st  of  March,  1810.  Died  at  Langholm,  Dumfries,  18th  of 
August,  1837. 

BECKHAM.  Thomas  Beckham.  Exchanged  as  lieutenant  from  the 
89th  Foot,  30th  of  August,  1820.  Placed  on  half  pay  of  the 
regiment  in  1821.  Before  joining  the  79th  Lieutenant  Beckham 
served  in  the  Peninsula  with  the  43rd  regiment. 

BEDFORD.  R.  B.  R.  Bedford.  Ensign,  19th  of  January,  1855; 
lieutenant,  9th  of  September,  1855.  Retired  from  the  service, 
10th  of  May,  1861. 

BELL.  James  Bell.  Ensign,  3rd  of  March,  1854;  lieutenant,  13th 
of  August,  1854;  captain,  half  pay,  4th  of  April,  1856.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battle  of  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebastopol,  and 
expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  two  clasps, 
and  Turkish  medal.) 

BELL.  James  Nicholas  Bell.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  of  the 
regiment,  1st  of  April,  1853;  transferred  to  the  93rd  High- 
landers, 1859,  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  209 

Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battle  of  Balaclava 
and  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  two  clasps,  and  Turkish 
medal.) 

BERTRAM.  Archibald  Bertram.  Transferred  in  1795,  as  captain, 
from  the  37th  regiment ;  exchanged  as  major  on  the  28th  of 
February,  1805,  to  the  100th  regiment.  Lost  at  sea.  He 
served  with  the  79th  in  Egypt  in  1801. 

BEST.  Richard  Mordesley  Best.  Exchanged  as  brevet-colonel  to 
the  79th  on  the  13th  of  September,  1864.  Served  previously 
in  the  Punjaub  campaign  of  1849  in  the  10th  Foot,  and  was 
present  at  the  siege  of  Mooltan  and  the  battle  of  Gujerat. 
(Slightly  wounded  in  the  leg.  Medal  with  two  clasps.)  Became 
major-general  on  the  28th  of  October,  1868,  and  lieutenant- 
general  on  the  1st  of  July,  1881. 

BIRCH.  Alexander  John  Colin  Birch.  Ensign,  2nd  of  March,  1855 ; 
lieutenant,  3rd  of  November,  1856.  Went  to  Indian  Staff 
Corps  in  1865. 

BLACKBURN.  Adam  Gillies  Blackburn.  2nd  lieutenant,  13th  of 
August,  1879;  lieutenant,  16th  of  June,  1880.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Dangerously 
wounded,  mentioned  in  despatches.  Medal  with  clasp,  5th 
class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Retired  in  con- 
sequence of  his  wounds,  which  necessitated  the  amputation  of 
his  leg,  on  the  23rd  of  February,  1884. 

BOOTHBY.     Robert  Tod  Boothby.     Ensign,  31st  of  March,  1848. 

BORTHWICK.  John  Borthwick.  Ensign,  6th  of  October,  1843. 
Retired,  20th  of  March,  1844. 

BORTHWICK.  Robert  Macgowan  Borthwick.  Ensign,  18th  of 
January,  1857  ;  lieutenant,  9th  of  April,  1861 ;  captain,  2nd  of 
March,  1872.  Retired  in  1879. 

P 


210  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

BOULTON.  Harold  Edwin  Boulton.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  25th 
of  July  1883. 

BOURKE.  Sir  Richard  Bourke,  K.C.B.  Exchanged  from  the  46th 
regiment  as  brevet  major  4th  of  January,  1810,  and  re- 
exchanged  to  half  pay  of  Lowenstein's  late  levy  on  the  22nd  of 
February,  1810.  Served  previously  in  the  campaign  in  Holland 
in  1799  ;  present  in  the  actions  of  the  27th  of  August,  10th  and 
19th  of  September,  and  2nd  and  6th  of  October;  at  the  latter  he 
received  a  severe  wound  through  both  jaws.  Served  in  South 
America  for  fifteen  months ;  present  at  the  actions  near  Monte 
Video,  on  the  19th  and  20th  of  January,  1807;  served  in  the 
expedition  against  Buenos  Ayres  in  the  same  year.  Became  a 
general  on  the  llth  of  November,  1851. 

BREBNER.  John  Brebner.  Ensign  from  the  85th  Foot,  15th  of 
November,  1859 ;  lieutenant,  31st  of  March,  1863.  Retired  in 
1869. 

BRITTAIN.  Richard  Brittain.  Appointed  paymaster  of  the  79th  on 
the  1st  of  January,  1810.  Died  at  Edinburgh  on  the  22nd  of 
May,  1815. 

BROWN.  Andrew  Brown,  C.B.  Ensign,  8th  of  September,  1795; 
captain,  17th  of  September,  1803.  Served  as  adjutant  of  the 
regiment  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  in  1801.  (Gold  medal 
from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Joined  the  1st  battalion  of  the  79th 
in  the  Peninsula  in  1811 ;  present  at  the  battles  of  Fuentes 
d'Onor,  Salamanca,  Nivelle,  Pyrenees,  and  Toulouse,  and  at 
the  siege  of  Burgos.  He  was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle 
of  Quatre  Bras.  He  became  a  lieutenant-colonel  in  1830.  and 
died  at  Derry  in  1835. 

BROWN.  Andrew  Brown.  Ensign,  26th  of  October,  1820;  lieu- 
tenant, 17th  of  March,  1825;  captain,  5th  of  April,  1831; 
major,  26th  of  May,  1838;  lieutenant-colonel,  8th  of  June, 
1841,  Exchanged  to  the  1st  Foot  on  the  29th  of  October,  1841, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  211 

BROWN.  Charles  Brown.  Ensign,  2nd  of  November,  1809;  lieu- 
tenant, 9th  of  May,  1811.  Lost  a  leg  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes 
d'Onor,  and  retired  upon  full  pay. 

BROWN.  James  Brown.  Ensign,  31st  of  September,  1803;  lieu- 
tenant, 22nd  of  April,  1805;  appointed  adjutant  of  the  Perth 
Militia,  27th  of  February,  1808;  afterwards  head  of  the  police 
at  Edinburgh,  where  he  died  in  1832. 

BROWN.  James  Dudgeon  Brown.  Exchanged  as  lieutenant  to  the 
79th  from  the  3rd  West  India  Regiment,  15th  of  November, 
1821;  captain,  29th  of  July,  1824;  was  given  an  unattached 
majority,  18th  of  May,  1832.  Died  at  Preston  Kirk  on  the 
16th  of  December,  1851.  Before  entering  the  79th  he  served 
in  the  campaign  in  Holland  in  1814,  and  was  present  at  the 
storming  of  Egmont-op-Zoom. 

BROWN.  John  Brown.  Appointed  paymaster  of  the  regiment, 
March,  1884,  and  served  with  it  in  the  Nile  expedition  of 
1884-85.  (Medal  and  clasp.)  Had  previously  served  with  the 
17th  Lancers  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  affairs  of  Bulganak  and  Mackenzie's  farm,  battles 
of  Alma,  Balaclava  (severely  wounded  and  horse  killed),  and 
Tchernaya,  and  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Served  in  the  Central 
Indian  campaign  in  1858-59,  and  was  present  at  the  action  of 
Burrode.  (Medal.)  Served  as  paymaster  of  the  17th  Lancers 
in  the  Zulu  war  of  1879.  (Medal.) 

BROWN.  James  Moray  Brown.  Ensign  from  the  84th  regiment, 
2nd  of  November,  1866;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871. 
Retired  in  1881. 

BROWN.  Thomas  Brown.  Ensign,  23rd  of  October,  1806 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 15th  of  December,  1807;  captain,  20th  of  July,  1815; 
placed  on  the  half  pay  of  the  regiment,  25th  of  February,  1816. 
He  was  present  with  the  regiment  at  the  siege  of  Copenhagen ; 


212  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

served  in  the  Peninsula  with  the  79th,  and  was  present  at  the 
battles  of  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Salamanca,  Pyrenees,  Nivelle, 
Nive,  and  Toulouse ;  at  the  action  of  Foz  d'Aronce,  and  at  the 
siege  of  Burgos.  He  was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of 
Quatre  Bras.  He  received  the  silver  medal  with  clasps,  and 
the  Waterloo  medal. 

BROWN.  Ebenezer  Brown,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  in 
the  79th,  24th  of  December,  1796 ;  transferred  to  the  30th 
regiment,  April  4th,  1800.  Died  at  Madras  in  1828. 

BROWNE.     Charles  Francis  Browne.     Ensign,  15th  of  October,  1850. 

BRUCE.  William  Bruce,  K.  H.  Exchanged  as  lieutenant  to  the 
79th  from  a  veteran  battalion,  26th  of  May,  1808  ;  captain,  14th 
of  March,  1811 ;  exchanged  to  the  82nd  regiment  as  a  captain, 
10th  of  July,  1817.  Served  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present 
at  the  battles  of  Albuhera,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse,  the 
blockade  of  Pempeluna,  and  at  the  investment  of  Bayonne. 
He  was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras.  He 
had  the  silver  medal  and  clasps  and  the  Waterloo  medal. 
Retired  as  a  colonel,  llth  of  December,  1849,  and  died  at  the 
Grosvenor  Hotel,  London,  in  1863. 

BUCHANAN.  Alexander  Buchanan  (Powis).  Ensign,  26th  of  May, 
1838;  lieutenant,  21st  of  August,  1840.  Retired  on  the  10th 
of  February,  1843. 

BUCKNALL.  Samuel  Charles  Lindsay  Bucknall.  Ensign,  21st  of 
October,  1862;  lieutenant,  15th  of  June,  1866.  Retired  in 
1878. 

BURNETT.  William  Burnett.  Transferred  as  ensign  from  the  72nd 
regiment  on  the  23rd  of  July,  1803;  re-transferred  to  the  18th 
Foot  on  the  19th  of  October,  1804.  Died  in  1812. 

BURKE.  John  Burke.  Exchanged  to  the  79th  as  lieutenant  on  the 
3rd  of  July,  1799. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  213 

BURKE.     John  Burke.     Ensign,  6th  of  July,  1804;  lieutenant,  24th 
of  April,  1805 ;  transferred  to  the  38th  regiment  on  the  26th~of- 
March,  1807.     Retired  on  the  4th  of  January,  1810. 

BUSFIELD.  John  Busfield.  Ensign,  30th  of  March,  1860;  lieutenant, 
12th  of  May,  1863;  captain,  16th  of  June,  1877.  Retired  in 
1880. 

BURRELL.  William  George  Burrell.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  in 
the  79th  on  the  14th  of  December,  1809.  Was  present  with 
the  79th  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo.  Transferred  to  the  5th 
Foot  on  the  llth  of  January,  1816.  Died  in  1820. 

BUTLER.  Thomas  Lewis  Butler.  Captain,  from  the  72nd  regiment, 
2nd  of  February,  1830.  Retired  on  the  23rd  of  August,  1834. 

BUTT.  Thomas  Bromhead  Butt.  Ensign,  3rd  of  April,  1840;  lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  of  August,  1842;  captain,  2nd  of  April,  1847; 
Major,  17th  of  July,  1857;  lieutenant-colonel,  26th  of  April, 
1859;  colonel,  23rd  of  May,  1864;  exchanged  to  the  86th 
regiment.  He  served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  with  the  79th 
Highlanders.  (Brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel.  Medal  and  clasp.) 

CALDER.  James  Calder.  Lieutenant,  19th  of  April,  1804.  He 
served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsular  war,  and  was  wounded  at 
the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor.  He  died  at  Abrantes  of  fever,  on 
the  25th  of  July,  1812. 

CAMERON.  Sir  Alan  Cameron,  K.C.B.,  of  Erracht.  Raised  the 
regiment  in  1793.  Served  with  and  commanded  the  regiment 
in  the  expedition  to  Holland  in  1799,  and  was  wounded  at  the 
battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee.  In  1800  he  served  with  the  expedition 
to  Ferrol  and  Cadiz,  and  afterwards  throughout  the  whole  of 
the  Egyptian  campaign  in  1801.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan 
Selim  III.)  In  1807  he  served  at  the  capture  of  Copenhagen, 
and  in  the  following  year  he  accompanied  the  expedition  to 


2t4  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Sweden,  under  Sir  John  Moore,  as  a  brigadier-general ;  returning 
to  England  the  same  year  he  was  ordered  with  the  79th  to 
Portugal.  He  commanded  a  brigade  at  the  battle  of  Talavera, 
where  he  had  two  horses  shot  under  him  (gold  medal);  and 
also  at  the  battle  of  Busaco.  On  the  25th  of  July,  1810,  he  was 
promoted  to  major-general,  and  at  the  termination  of  the  war 
he  was  nominated  a  K.C.B.  On  the  12th  of  August,  1819,  he 
became  a  lieutenant-general.  He  died  at  Fulham  on  the  9th 
of  March,  1828. 

CAMERON.  Allan  Cameron.  Appointed  lieutenant  in  the  79th,  17th 
of  July,  1801,  from  the  llth  Foot.  He  served  with  the  79th  in 
Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  wounded  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria. 
(Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  was  transferred  to 
the  8th  Garrison  battalion  in  1806,  and  retired  on  half  pay. 
Died  at  Perth  in  1835. 

CAMERON.  Allan  Cameron.  Ensign,  19th  of  April,  1805  ;  lieutenant, 
30th  of  January,  1806 ;  went  on  half  pay  in  1808,  but  was 
re-appointed  to  the  79th  as  paymaster  in  1821.  He  exchanged 
to  half  pay  of  the  5th  Foot  on  the  25th  of  April,  1824.  Died 
at  Clunes  on  the  13th  of  April,  1841. 

CAMERON.  Alexander  Cameron.  Ensign,  5th  of  November,  1794; 
lieutenant,  6th  of  September,  1795.  Served  with  the  79th  in 
Holland  in  1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee ; 
accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan 
Selim  III.).  He  served  continuously  with  the  79th  in  the 
Peninsula  until  he  was  killed  at  the  battle  of  Busaco  in  1810. 

CAMERON.  Alexander  Cameron.  Ensign,  29th  of  December,  1804  ; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  llth  of  June,  1807. 
Retired  in  1812,  and  died  at  sea  whilst  returning  from  the 
West  Indies. 

CAMERON.  Alexander  Cameron.  Ensign,  8th  of  April,  1806;  lieu- 
tenant, 12th  of  May,  1807;  captain  and  brevet-major,  21st  of 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  215 

January,  1819.  Died  at  Tobago  in  1820.  He  served  with  the 
79th  Highlanders  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen  and 
throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  being  wounded  at  the  battles  of 
Fuentes  d'Onor  and  Toulouse ;  he  was  also  present  at  the  battle 
of  Quatre  Bras,  and  commanded  the  remnant  of  the  regiment 
at  the  close  of  the  battle  of  Waterloo,  where  he  was  slightly 
wounded.  (Brevet  of  major.)  He  was  a  son  of  Cameron  of 
Scamadale,  and  nephew  of  Sir  Alan  Cameron. 

CAMERON.  Alexander  Cameron.  Ensign,  17th  of  July,  1815;  lieu- 
tenant, 7th  of  March,  1822;  half  pay,  29th  of  March,  1827. 
Died  in  the  south  of  France  on  the  16th  of  January,  1832. 
Before  being  gazetted  to  the  regiment  he  served  with  it  as  a 
volunteer  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras>  where  he  was  wounded. 

CAMERON.  Archibald  Cameron.  Ensign,  13th  of  January,  1814  ; 
lieutenant,  26th  of  July,  1815  ;  exchanged  to  the  89th  regiment, 
15th  of  February,  1821 ;  half  pay,  25th  of  July,  1821.  Died  on 
the  5th  of  March,  1824.  He  served  with  the  regiment  at  the 
battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  He  was  a  brother  of 
Lieutenant  Alexander  Cameron,  who  commanded  the  regiment 
at  the  close  of  Waterloo. 

CAMERON.  Charles  Cameron.  Ensign,  9th  of  April,  1826 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 12th  of  February,  1828;  exchanged  to  the  4th  Foot  on 
the  llth  of  December,  1828;  afterwards  in  the  78th  High- 
landers. Retired  on  the  12th  of  July,  1839. 

CAMERON.  Donald  Cameron.  Ensign,  4th  of  November,  1794; 
lieutenant,  2nd  of  September,  1795;  captain,  3rd  of  September, 
1801 ;  major,  30th  of  May,  1811.  Retired  on  the  1st  of  April, 
1812.  Died  near  Maidstone.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in 
Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria. 
(Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  afterwards  served 
in  the  Peninsula  with  the  79th. 

CAMERON.  Donald  Cameron.  Ensign,  10th  of  April,  1806;  lieu- 
tenant, 13th  of  May,  1807.  He  was  present  with  the  regiment 


216  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen  in  1807,  and  was  wounded 
in  the  attack  on  Cadiz  on  the  12th  of  February,  1810.  He 
served  in  the  Peninsular  war  with  the  79th,  and  was  severely 
wounded  at  Toulouse.  He  was  also  present  at  the  battles  of 
Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo,  and  died  in  July,  1815,  of  wounds 
received  at  Waterloo. 

CAMERON.  Donald  Cameron.  Ensign,  4th  of  October,  1815;  half 
pay,  25th  of  February,  1816.  Retired  from  the  service  in  1829. 

CAMERON.  Donald  Cameron.  Captain,  19th  of  August,  1793.  He 
was  one  of  the  first  officers  appointed  to  the  regiment  by  Sir 
Alan  Cameron,  K.C.B.  Retired  in  1796. 

CAMERON.  Duncan  Cameron,  C.B.  Appointed  lieutenant,  2nd  of 
November,  1796;  captain,  19th  of  April,  1804;  major,  29th  of 
October,  1812;  brevet-lieutenant-colonel,  12th  of  April,  1814. 
Retired  on  the  3rd  of  June,  1819.  Died  near  Toronto,  Upper 
Canada,  on  the  14th  of  October,  1842.  He  served  with  the 
79th  Highlanders  in  Holland,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Egmont-op-Zee ;  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801 ; 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.)  He  was  at  the  bombardment  of  Copen- 
hagen in  1807,  and  served  continuously  throughout  the  Penin- 
sular war.  He  was  made  a  brevet-lieutenant-colonel  for  his 
conduct  at  the  battle  of  Toulouse.  He  was  very  severely 
wounded  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras,  for  which  battle  he  was 
made  a  Companion  of  the  Bath. 

CAMERON.  Duncan  Cameron.  Ensign,  9th  of  November,  1799 ; 
lieutenant,  9th  of  December,  1802 ;  captain,  25th  of  March,  1805. 

CAMERON.  Duncan  Cameron.  Ensign,  19th  of  July,  1810;  lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  of  April,  1812.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  the 
Peninsula.  Was  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and 
killed  at  Toulouse. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  217 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron,  youngest  son  of  Sir  Alan.  Lieutenant, 
25th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  10th  of  April,  1806.  He  acted 
his  father's  aide-de-camp  at  the  battle  of  Talavera,  and  died  of 
fever  at  Lisbon,  brought  on  by  hardships  and  exposure  during 
the  campaign. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Ensign,  7th  of  April,  1804 ;  lieutenant, 
25th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  8th  of  April,  1811.  Died  at 
Erracht  in  1813. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Ensign,  20th  of  May,  1806;  lieutenant, 
14th  of  May,  1807. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Ensign,  16th  of  March,  1809;  lieu- 
tenant, 29th  of  May,  1811.  Served  with  the  79th  continuously 
in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Toulouse. 
He  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras,  and  was  wounded 
at  Waterloo.  He  died  in  Ireland  in  1822  of  brain  fever. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Ensign,  26th  of  July,  1810;  lieutenant, 
1st  of  October,  1812.  He  died  of  wounds  received  at  the  battle  of 
Toulouse,  and  was  buried  in  the  same  grave  as  Captain  Purves, 
Captain  John  Cameron,  and  Lieutenant  Duncan  Cameron,  all 
of  the  79th  Highlanders,  in  the  citadel  at  Toulouse. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Appointed  lieutenant  from  the  75th 
regiment,  31st  of  July,  1828;  captain,  29th  of  March,  1839. 
Retired  on  the  21st  of  August,  1840. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron,  known  as  "  Eoghainn  Mor,"  a  younger 
brother  of  Sir  Alan's.  Was  appointed  captain  and  recruiting 
officer  in  Lochaber,  17th  of  August,  1793.  He  raised  the  first 
company  of  the  79th. 

CAMERON.  Ewen  Cameron.  Lieutenant,  7th  of  June,  1794.  Retired 
in  1796. 

CAMERON.  Archibald  Cameron.  Ensign,  22nd  of  August,  1793, 
Retired  in  1796. 


'218  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

CAMERON.  Adam  Cameron.  Ensign,  6th  of  November,  1794;  lieu- 
tenant, 5th  of  September,  1795.  Retired  in  1797. 

CAMERON.     James  Cameron.     Ensign,  4th  of  September,  1805. 

CAMERON.  James  Cameron.  Appointed  lieutenant  in  the  79th  from 
the  85th  regiment,  25th  of  January,  1813.  He  was  present  at 
the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo,  and  died  at  Blandecque, 
France,  in  1818. 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  7th  of  November,  1794;  lieu- 
tenant, 5th  of  September,  1795.  He  served  in  Holland  in  1799 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee.  He  accom- 
panied the  79th  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  at  the  battle  before 
Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  3rd  November,  1799;  lieu- 
tenant, 8th  of  December,  1802;  exchanged  to  the  1st  Foot  as 
captain,  and  was  killed  at  the  storming  of  St.  Sebastien, 
July,  1813. 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  21st  of  April,  1805;  lieutenant, 
8th  of  April,  1806;  captain,  13th  January,  1814.  Was  killed 
at  the  battle  of  Toulouse. 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  23rd  of  April,  1805;  lieutenant, 
12th  of  May,  1806;  captain,  1st  April,  1812,  He  served  with 
the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula  and  at  Quatre  Bras,  and  was 
killed  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo. 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  8th  of  April,  1806;  lieutenant, 
llth  of  May,  1807;  captain,  26th  of  May,  1814;  exchanged  to 
the  92nd  Highlanders,  and  went  on  half  pay,  21st  of  August, 
1835.  He  died  in  Jersey  on  the  2nd  of  February,  1851.  He 
accompanied  the  Walcheren  expedition  and  was  present  at  the 
siege  of  Flushing.  He  served  with  the  79th  throughout  the 
Peninsular  war  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Corunna, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  210 

Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Salamanca    Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive, 
and  Toulouse.  (Silver  medal  with  eight  clasps.) 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Ensign,  17th  of  August,  1806;  lieu- 
tenant, 13th  of  August,  1807;  exchanged  to  the  4th  Garrison 
battalion,  26th  of  May,  1808  ;  half  pay,  1815.  He  was  present 
with  the  79th  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen. 

CAMERON.  John  Campbell  Cameron.  Ensign,  12th  of  March,  1801 ; 
lieutenant,  29th  of  November,  1804.  Retired  on  the  13th  of 
June,  1811,  and  died  of  consumption  in  Scotland  brought  on 
by  exposure.  He  accompanied  the  79th  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  Medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  served  in  the  Peninsula  and  com- 
manded the  detachment  of  the  79th  at  the  battle  of  Talavera, 
where  he  was  taken  prisoner  by  the  French — effecting  his  escape 
the  same  night. 

CAMERON.  Kenneth  Cameron,  of  Clunes,  in  Lochaber.  Ensign, 
22nd  of  April,  1805;  lieutenant,  10th  of  April,  1806;  captain, 
18th  of  May,  1814;  placed  on  half  pay  of  the  regiment  on  the 
25th  of  February,  1816,  but  returned  on  full  pay  the  following 
year.  Retired  as  major  on  the  7th  of  August,  1835.  He  served 
with  the  79th  Highlanders  throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  and 
was  present  at  the  battles  of  Corunna,  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor, 
Salamanca,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.  (Wounded.)  He 
was  adjutant  of  the  regiment  during  the  latter  part  of  the  war. 
In  the  affair  of  Foz  d'Aronce  Lieutenant  Kenneth  Cameron, 
who  was  in  the  light  company,  captured  the  colonel  of  the  39th 
French  Infantry  and  took  him  a  prisoner  to  head-quarters.  He 
died  in  Canada  on  the  20th  of  June,  1872,  aged  84,  and  there 
is  a  fine  monument  to  his  memory  in  the  churchyard  of  Thorah, 
Ontario. 

CAMERON.  Lachlan  Maclean  Cameron.  Ensign,  13th  of  October, 
1812;  lieutenant,  20th  of  May,  1814;  half  pay,  26th  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1829,  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsular 


220  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

war,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Pyrenees,  Nivelle, 
Orthes,  and  Toulouse.  (Silver  medal  with  four  clasps.)  He 
commanded  a  party  of  volunteers  during  the  Canadian  rebellion 
of  1838. 

CAMERON.  Nathaniel  Cameron,  second  son  of  Sir  Alan.  Ensign, 
6th  of  April,  1804;  lieutenant,  25th  of  March,  1805;  captain, 
9th  of  April,  1806;  major,  1st  of  April,  1812;  lieutenant- 
colonel,  24th  of  June,  1813;  placed  on  half  pay  on  the  25th  of 
February,  1816.  Retired  in  July,  1828.  He  commanded  the 
second  battalion  of  the  79th  from  the  24th  of  June,  1813,  until 
placed  on  half  pay. 

CAMERON.  Philips  Cameron,  eldest  son  of  Sir  Alan.  Appointed 
captain,  6th  of  June,  1794;  major,  3rd  of  September,  1801; 
lieutenant-colonel,  19th  of  April,  1804.  Served  with  the  79th 
in  Holland  in  1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op- 
Zee.  He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt,  and  was  at  the 
battle  of  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 
He  was  present  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen,  and 
proceeded  with  the  79th  to  Portugal.  He  commanded  the 
regiment  during  the  disastrous  retreat  to  and  at  the  battle  of 
Corunna.  (Gold  Medal.)  He  died  of  wounds  received  at  the 
battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor. 

CAMERON.  Thomas  Cochrane  Cameron.  Appointed  lieutenant  in 
the  79th  from  half  pay,  8th  of  April,  1825.  Placed  on  half  pay 
again  on  the  1st  of  November,  1833. 

CAMERON.  Nathaniel  Cameron.  Lieutenant,  8th  of  June,  1794. 
Retired  in  1796. 

CAMERON.  William  Cameron.  Ensign,  18th  of  April,  1805;  lieu- 
tenant, 8th  of  April,  1806;  captain,  17th  of  June,  1813. 
Placed  on  half  pay  on  the  25th  of  February,  1816.  He  died  at 
Camisky,  near  Fort  William,  on  the  1st  of  September,  1834. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  221 

CAMERON.  O'Kane  Cameron.  Ensign,  1st  of  November,  1797. 
Retired  in  1798. 

CAMERON.  Gordon  Cameron.  Lieutenant,  5th  of  November,  1794. 
Retired  in  1797. 

CAMERON.  William  Gordon  Cameron.  Transferred  as  lieutenant  to 
the  Cameron  Highlanders  from  the  4th  Foot.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Medal 
with  clasp.)  Died  of  wounds  received  during  the  defence  of 
Kosheh  in  the  Soudan. 

CAMERON.  Angus  Cameron.  Served  as  a  sergeant  with  the  79th 
during  the  Peninsular  war,  and  was  appointed  quarter-master  on 
the  13th  of  February,  1812.  He  was  present  as  quarter-master  at 
the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  In  1841  he  became 
paymaster  of  the  Canadian  Rifles,  and  died  in  Canada  in  1845. 

CAMPBELL.  Archibald  Campbell.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800; 
exchanged  to  the  60th  Rifles  on  the  12th  of  March,  1801. 

CAMPBELL.  David  Campbell.  Appointed  lieutenant  in  the  79th  from 
the  67th  regiment,  25th  of  March,  1824 ;  transferred  to  the  91st 
Foot,  30th  of  July,  1829. 

CAMPBELL.  Charles  Campbell.  Exchanged  as  a  captain  from  the  94th 
Foot,  25th  of  August,  1809;  placed  on  half  pay  of  the  regiment 
on  the  12th  of  November,  1812.  Died  at  Glasgow  on  the  6th  of 
April,  1836. 

CAMPBELL.  Donald  Campbell.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 22nd  of  October,  1803;  captain,  19th  of  April,  1804; 
major,  13th  of  January,  1814;  placed  on  half  pay  of  the 
regiment  on  the  25th  of  February,  1816;  brevet-lieutenant- 
colonel,  22nd  of  July,  1830.  Died  at  Bonar  Bridge,  Suther- 
landshire,  on  the  6th  of  December,  1844.  He  accompanied 
the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 


900 


HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 


CAMPBELL.  Archibald  Campbell.  Ensign,  24th  of  June,  1853. 
Retired  in  1854. 

CAMPBELL.  Donald  Campbell.  Ensign,  2nd  of  March,  1815;  lieu- 
tenant, 26th  of  October,  1820;  exchanged  as  a  lieutenant  to  the 
20th  regiment.  Died  at  sea. 

CAMPBELL.     George  Campbell.     Ensign,  26th  of  October,  1806. 

CAMPBELL.  Henry  Wotton  Campbell.  Ensign,  14th  of  April,  1843; 
lieutenant,  4th  of  July,  1845;  captain,  22nd  of  October,  1852. 
Retired  on  the  26th  of  December,  1856.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 
battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and 
the  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  clasps  and 
Turkish  medal,  brevet  of  major,  Knight  of  the  Legion  of 
Honour.) 

CAMPBELL.  James  Campbell.  Captain,  5th  of  September,  1805; 
brevet-major,  12th  of  August,  1819;  major,  31st  of  October, 
1826.  Retired  December,  1826 ;  died  of  consumption.  He 
served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula,  at  Quatre  Bras,  and 
at  Waterloo,  being  wounded  at  the  battles  of  Toulouse  and 
Waterloo. 

CAMPBELL.  James  Campbell,  K.  H.  Exchanged  as  a  captain  from 
the  91st  Foot,  2nd  of  July,  1812;  major,  3rd  of  June,  1819; 
lieutenant-colonel,  10th  of  July,  1824 ;  exchanged  to  the  95th 
regiment  on  the  27th  of  September,  1831.  Served  during  the 
Irish  rebellion  in  1798-99,  wounded  in  the  hand  at  Wilson's 
Hospital ;  expedition  to  Hanover  in  1805  ;  Walcheren  expedition 
in  1809. 

CAMPBELL.  John  Campbell.  Ensign,  7th  of  October,  1807;  lieu- 
tenant, 9th  of  November,  1809.  Retired  in  January,  1814. 
Died  at  Campbeltown,  Argyleshire. 

CAMPBELL.  John  Alexander  Gavin  Campbell.  Ensign,  2nd  of 
August,  1842;  lieutenant,  llth  of  April,  1845;  exchanged  to 


79lH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  223 

the  1st  Foot  on  the  24th  of  July,  1846.  He  carried  the  Queen's 
Colour  of  the  Breadlalbane  Highlanders  in  1842,  when  Her 
Majesty  visited  Taymouth.  Became  Earl  of  Breadalbane  in 

1862. 

CAMPBELL.  James  Campbell.  Ensign,  19th  of  May,  1814;  appoint- 
ment cancelled  on  the  30th  of  November,  1815. 

CAMPBELL.  Hon.  Ivan  Campbell.  2nd  lieutenant  from  the  High- 
land Borderers  Militia,  llth  of  October,  1879;  lieutenant,  23rd 
of  June,  1880.  Served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  through- 
out the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Retired  on  the  22nd  of  August,  1884. 

CAMPBELL.  Neil  Campbell.  Lieutenant,  8th  of  October,  1794; 
captain,  1st  of  November,  1796  ;  half  pay,  1800. 

CAMPBELL.  Neil  Campbell.  Lieutenant  from  the  78th  Highlanders, 
25th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  8th  of  April,  1806.  He  served 
with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula,  at  Quatre  Bras,  and  at  Waterloo. 
He  was  slightly  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras  and  mortally  at  the 
battle  of  Waterloo.  He  died  in  Brussels  in  October,  1815. 

CAMPBELL.  Neil  Campbell.  Ensign,  22nd  of  February,  1855;  lieu- 
tenant, 21st  of  September,  1855;  captain,  30th  of  November, 
1866  ;  brevet-major,  19th  of  April,  1880.  Retired  on  a  pension 
with  the  rank  of  lieutenant-colonel  on  the  2 1st  of  July,  1880. 
He  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Crimea  from  the  16th  of  August, 
1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with 
clasp  and  Turkish  medal.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  attack  on 
the  fort  at  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahje- 
hanpore,  capture  of  forts  Bunniar  and  Mahomdie,  passage  of 
the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of  Rampore  Russia,  and  sub- 
sequent operations  in  Oude  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Served  on  the  north-west  frontier  of  India 


224  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

against  the  Mohraund  tribes,  near  Peshawur;    present  at  the 
affairs  of  Michinie  and  Shubkudder.     (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CAMPBELL.  Archibald  Campbell.  Ensign,  16th  of  December,  1795. 
Retired  in  1798. 

CAMPBELL.  James  Campbell.  Appointed  captain,  30th  of  December, 
1795.  Retired  in  1800.  Was  wounded  at  the  battle  of 
Egmont-op-Zee,  where  he  commanded  the  Grenadier  company. 

CAMPBELL.  Walter  Douglas  Somerset  Campbell,  (Islay.)  Ensign, 
15th  of  June,  1860;  lieutenant,  7th  of  November,  1863; 
captain,  31st  of  October,  1877.  Retired  on  the  12th  of 
February,  1881. 

CAMPBELL.  F.  Pemberton  Campbell.  Ensign,  3rd  of  November, 
1854;  lieutenant,  9th  of  March,  1855  ;  transferred  to  the  83rd 
regiment,  1862.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern 
campaign  of  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol 
and  assault  of  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with  clasp  and 
Turkish  medal.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CAMPBELL.  James  Bell  Campbell.  Ensign  from  the  Ceylon  Rifle 
Regiment,  21st  of  September,  1855.  Retired  in  1859. 

CAMPBELL.  George  Campbell.  Ensign,  29th  of  July,  1862.  Retired 
in  1866. 

CAMPBELL.  John  Francis  Glencairn  Campbell.  Major-general,  12th 
of  November,  1860;  colonel  of  the  79th,  12th  of  July,  1868. 
He  commanded  the  91st  regiment  throughout  the  whole  of  the 
Kaffir  war  of  1846-47.  He  died  as  a  lieutenant-general  in  1870. 

CAMPBELL-ORDE.  Arthur  J.  Campbell-Orde,  younger,  of  Kilmorey. 
Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  27th  of  October,  1883. 

CANT.  David  Cant.  Ensign  from  quarter-master-sergeant,  10th  of 
August,  1854;  lieutenant,  8th  of  December,  1854;  paymaster, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  225 

24th  of  June,  1856  ;  major,  10th  of  August,  1869.  Served  with 
the  79th  Highlanders  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of 
1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  the  siege 
of  Sebastopol,  assault  of  the  18th  of  June,  and  expedition  to 
Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps  and  Turkish 
medal.)  Served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of 
Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CARDROSS,  Henry.  Lord  Cardross.  Ensign,  16th  of  March,  1832. 
Retired  on  the  27th  of  July,  1832.  Died  on  the  21st  of 
December,  1836. 

CAREY.     Robert  Carey.     Ensign,  24th  of  November,  1803. 
CARMICHAEL.     Peter  Carmichael.     Ensign,  19th  of  March,  1807. 

CARTAN.  William  Cartan.  Ensign,  20th  of  July,  1815;  lieutenant, 
12th  of  December,  1822;  captain,  28th  of  August,  1838. 
Afterwards  staff  officer  of  pensioners  at  Belfast. 

CARTER.  N.  Carter.  Ensign,  30th  of  May,  1811;  exchanged  to 
Staff  Corps  Cavalry,  13th  of  October,  1815. 

CASTLE.  William  Castle.  Appointed  paymaster  of  the  79th,  16th  of 
February,  1829  ;  left  the  regiment  on  the  19th  of  February,  1836. 

CATHCART.  Hon.  Charles  Cathcart.  2nd  lieutenant  from  the  82nd 
regiment,  12th  of  April,  1879.  Died  in  London  on  the  21st  of 
May,  1880. 

CAVAYE.  George  Ross  Cavaye.  2nd  lieutenant,  23rd  of  October, 
1880;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and 
Khedive's  star.)  He  also  served  throughout  the  Nile  expe- 
dition of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders.  (Clasp.) 
Served  in  the  operation  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in 
1885-86  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was  present  at 
Kosheh  during  the  investment,  and  in  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

Q 


226  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

CHALMERS.     John  Snodgrass  Chalmers.     Ensign,  llth  of  April,  1845  ; 
lieutenant,  10th  of  April,  1849.     Went  to  36th  regiment. 

CHALMERS.  Norman  Guthrie  Chalmers.  Ensign,  llth  of  January, 
1867;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871  ;  captain,  21st  of  July, 
1880;  major,  21st  of  November,  1881.  Served  with  the 
Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with 
clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  He  also  served  throughout  the 
Nile  expedition  of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 
(Clasp.)  Served  in  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  in  1885-86  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was 
present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the  recon- 
naissance on  the  16th  of  December.  (Severely  wounded. 
Mentioned  in  despatches,  and  awarded  the  4th  class  of  the 
Osmanieh  for  active  and  distinguished  service  in  the  field  in 
saving  the  life  of  Major  Hunter,  in  doing  which  he  was 
wounded.) 

CHAPMAN.  Frederick  Stovin  Chapman.  Exchanged  as  captain  from 
the  21st  Royal  Scots  Fusiliers,  29th  of  October,  1881.  Served 
with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  in  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882 
from  the  landing  at  Ismailia,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.) 

CHEETHAM.  Isaac  Cheetham.  Ensign,  6th  of  August,  1811;  lieu- 
tenant, 10th  of  December,  1812  ;  appointed  to  the  40th  regiment 
on  the  17th  of  December,  1812.  He  had  previously  served  in 
the  29th  regiment.  He  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Roleia, 
Vimiera,  Talavera,  Busaco,  Albuhera,  Salamanca,  Vittoria, 
Pyrenees,  Orthes,  and  Toulouse.  (Silver  medal  with  ten  clasps.) 

CHRISTIE.  John  Stedman  Christie.  Lieutenant,  19th  of  April,  1804 ; 
captain,  29th  of  May,  1811;  exchanged  to  the  42nd  High- 
landers. Died  in  Portugal. 

CHRISTIE.  Napier  Turner  Christie.  Exchanged  as  ensign  from  the 
93rd  Highlanders,  18th  of  July,  1822;  lieutenant,  10th  of 
September,  1825;  transferred  to  the  llth  regiment, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  227 

CHRISTIE.  Robert  Christie.  Ensign,  20th  of  August,  1812;  lieu- 
tenant, 18th  of  May,  1814;  placed  on  half  pay,  16th  of  April, 
1817.  Retired  in  1830.  Served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula, 
and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  the  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive, 
and  Toulouse. 

CHURCHILL.  Charles  Henry  Churchill.  Exchanged  as  a  captain 
from  the  60th  regiment  on  the  26th  of  July,  1833 ;  appointed  a 
lieutenant-colonel  in  the  British  Legion  of  Spain,  4th  of  August, 
1835.  (K.  St.  F.). 

CLAY.  Albert  Newby  Clay.  Ensign,  7th  of  September,  1855;  lieu- 
tenant, 1st  of  July,  1859;  captain,  15th  of  June,  1866;  major, 
4th  of  June,  1879.  Retired  on  the  13th  of  April,  1881.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Indian  campaign  of 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow;  attack  on 
the  fort  of  Rooyah  ;  actions  of  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahje- 
hanpore ;  capture  of  forts  Bunniar  and  Mahomdie ;  passage  of 
the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad ;  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia ;  and 
subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee 
rivers.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CLEATHER.  William  B.  Gordon  Cleather.  Ensign,  13th  of  October, 
1854;  lieutenant,  9th  of  January,  1855;  captain,  9th  of  April, 
1861 ;  exchanged  to  the  47th  regiment  in  1863.  He  served 
with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1855, 
including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol  and  assault  of  the  8th 
of  September.  (Medal  and  clasp  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also 
in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and 
capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CLEPHANE.  Robert  Douglas  Clephane.  Ensign,  8th  of  June,  1838; 
lieutenant,  18th  of  September,  1840;  captain,  llth  of  April, 
1845.  He  served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854 — and  up  to 
the  25th  of  June,  1855,  with  the  79th  Highlanders— including 
the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava ;  siege  of  Sebastopol ;  assault 


228  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

on  the  18th  of  June;  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale. 
(Medal  with  three  clasps,  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel,  and  the 
Sardinian  and  Turkish  medals.) 

COCKBURN.  James  Cockburn.  Ensign,  12th  of  February,  1828; 
lieutenant,  23rd  of  August,  1833;  captain,  8th  of  June,  1838; 
half  pay,  21st  of  February,  1840. 

COCKBURN.  Wemyss  Thomas  Cockburn.  Ensign,  21st  of  August, 
1849;  exchanged  to  the  35th  regiment  in  1850. 

COCKELL.  George  Cockell.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  to  the  79th, 
25th  of  June,  1801 ;  transferred  to  the  13th  regiment  in  1808. 

COOKSEY.  Walter  C.  Cooksey.  Ensign,  7th  of  August,  1799;  lieu- 
tenant, 3rd  of  September,  1801 ;  captain,  30th  April,  1807. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Egyptian  campaign 
of  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Alexandria.  (Gold 
medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Carried  the  regimental 
colour  at  the  attack  on  Ferrol.  Served  with  the  79th  in  the 
Peninsula,  and  was  killed  on  picquet  near  Almeida  in  1811. 

COOPER.  Henry  Cooper.  Major-general,  9th  of  November,  1862; 
colonel  of  the  79th,  21st  of  August,  1870.  He  served  with  the 
45th  regiment  in  the  Kaffir  war  of  1846-47.  (Medal.)  Transferred 
as  colonel  to  the  45th  Foot  on  the  17th  of  March,  1876. 

CORBALLIS.  James  Frederick  Corballis.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
18th  of  October,  1884;  appointed  to  the  18th  Royal  Irish  in 

1887. 

CORNES.  John  Cornes.  Quarter-master  of  the  53rd  regiment,  25th 
of  June,  1841 ;  paymaster  of  the  79th  Highlanders,  5th  of 
November,  1847.  He  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Aliwal  and 
Sobraon,  and  at  the  action  of  Buddiwal.  (Wounded.  Mentioned 
in  despatches.)  He  served  with  the  77th  regiment  in  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battle  of  Alma  and 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  229 

the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.     (Medal  with  clasp  and  Turkish 
medal.)     He  went  on  half  pay  on  the  24th  of  June,  1856. 

COTTER.  William  Pomeroy  Cotter.  Ensign,  21st  of  October,  1799; 
left  the  regiment  in  1800. 

COURTNEY.  George  Courtney.  Ensign,  21st  of  May,  1814;  placed 
on  half  pay  on  the  16th  of  March,  1816;  afterwards  in  the  97th 
regiment. 

COWAN.  Thomas  Cowan.  Ensign,  19th  of  October,  1812;  lieu- 
tenant, 26th  of  May,  1814;  half  pay,  1821. 

CRAWFORD.  John  Crawford.  Ensign,  25th  of  June,  1812.  Appoint- 
ment cancelled  on  the  9th  of  December,  1812. 

CRAWFORD.  Alexander  Speirs  Crawford.  Ensign,  18th  of  May, 
1814;  lieutenant,  27th  of  July,  1815.  Served  with  the  79th  at 
the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  (Slightly  wounded.) 
Half  pay,  25th  of  February,  1816. 

CRAWFORD.  William  J.  M.  Crawford.  Ensign,  25th  of  August,  1854  ; 
lieutenant,  9th  of  February,  1855;  captain,  23rd  of  October, 
1860;  exchanged  to  the  24th  regiment  in  1862.  He  served 
with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1855, 
including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  clasp 
and  Turkish  Medal.)  Also  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

CROMBIE.  Thomas  Crombie.  Ensign,  12th  of  August,  1824;  lieu- 
tenant, 8th  of  February,  1826;  captain,  18th  of  May,  1832; 
exchanged  to  the  60th  regiment. 

CROZIER.  Burrard  Rawson  Crozier.  Transferred  as  a  captain  from 
the  46th  regiment  on  the  29th  June,  1881 ;  exchanged  to  the 
Royal  Scots  Fusiliers  on  the  29th  of  October,  1881. 

CRUIKSHANK.  William  Cruikshank,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant- 
surgeon  to  the  79th,  26th  of  October,  1830;  left  the  regiment 
in  1836. 


230  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

CRUIKSHANKS.  Alexander  Cruikshanks.  Quarter-master,  12th  of" 
October,  1838.  Retired  on  half  pay  on  the  llth  of  May,  1849. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  at  the  bombardment  of 
Copenhagen  in  1807;  expedition  to  Sweden  in  1808;  Walcheren 
expedition ;  present  at  the  siege  of  Flushing ;  expedition  to 
Cadiz.  He  served  in  the  Peninsula  with  the  79th ;  was  taken 
prisoner  by  the  French  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and 
was  wounded  at  Toulouse.  He  was  present  with  the  regiment 
at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  He  was  in 
possession  of  the  silver  war  medal,  with  clasps  for  Busaco, 
Fuentes  d'Onof,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse. 

CRUTCHLEY.  Robert  J.  Logan  Crutchley.  Captain  from  the  24th 
regiment,  1862  ;  went  to  Indian  Staff  Corps  in  1865. 

CUMING.  Edward  William  Cuming.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1846; 
lieutenant,  31st  of  March,  1848  ;  captain,  8th  of  October,  1854 ; 
major,  2nd  of  March,  1872 ;  placed  on  retired  pay,  1st  of  July, 
1881.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  throughout  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and 
Balaclava;  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol;  assaults  of  the  18th  of 
June  and  the  8th  of  September;  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie, 
and  Turkish  medal.) 

CUNNINGHAME.  William  Cunninghame.  Ensign,  26th  of  June,  1846; 
lieutenant,  31st  of  December,  1847;  captain,  13th  of  August, 
1854.  Retired  in  1857.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854  up  to  the  26th  of  November, 
also  from  January  to  the  9th  of  February,  1855,  including  the 
battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava  and  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal 
with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.) 

CURRIE.  Henry  Currie.  Captain,  from  the  74th  Highlanders,  10th 
of  March,  1869.  Retired  as  major  on  half  pay  on  the  8th  of 
December,  1877. 


79'J'II    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  231 

DALZELL.  Robert  Harris  Carnwath  Dalzell.  Ensign,  15th  of  June, 
1866  ;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871  ;  captain,  10th  ol 
April,  1880  ;  Major,  21st  of  November,  1881.  Retired  in  1886. 

DAVIDSON.  Charles  Frederick  Herbert  Davidson.  2nd  lieutenant, 
23rd  of  October,  1880 ;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Served 
with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of 
1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal 
with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  in  the  expedition  to 
the  Soudan  in  1884,  with  the  Gordon  Highlanders,  and  was 
present  at  the  engagements  of  El-Teb  and  Tamaii.  (Two  clasps.) 
Also  served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85,  on 
special  service  as  transport  officer,  and  took  part  in  the 
operations  of  the  desert  column.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1886  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders. 

DAVIDSON.  Duncan  Francis  Davidson,  younger,  of  Desswood.  2nd 
lieutenant,  23rd  of  October,  1880 ;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July,  1881 ; 
captain,  1st  of  December,  1886.  Served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition 
of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders.  (Clasp.)  Served 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
of  1885-86  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was  present 
at  Kosheh  during  its  investment  (slightly  wounded),  at  the 
reconnaissance  on  the  16th  of  December,  and  in  the  engage- 
ment at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches.) 

DAVIDSON.  Sinclair  Davidson.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800 ; 
lieutenant,  31st  of  March,  1804  ;  Captain,  14th  of  February, 
1811.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  of 
1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold 
medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Served  throughout  the 
Peninsular  war,  with  the  79th,  until  he  died  of  wounds  received 
at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor. 


232  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

DAWSON.  John  Dawson.  Captain,  6th  of  November,  1801. 
Drowned  o/i  passage  from  Harwich  to  Landguard  Fort,  18th  of 
April,  1807,  with  all  the  detachment  under  his  command. 

DEANS.  James  Deans.  Ensign,  13th  of  October,  1815;  exchanged 
to  the  92nd  Highlanders  in  1820. 

DEMPSTER.  James  Carrol  Dempster.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon 
to  the  79th,  15th  of  January,  1841.  Appointed  to  the  33rd 
regiment,  23rd  of  September,  1845. 

DOBIE.  William  Alexander  Dobie.  Ensign,  6th  of  April,  1855 ; 
transferred  to  the  1st  West  India  regiment  as  lieutenant,  24th 
of  February,  1857. 

DOIG.  Alexander  Doig.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon,  21st  of  June, 
1864  ;  medical  department,  1874. 

DORAN.  William  Doran.  Exchanged  as  Major  to  the  79th,  22nd  of 
February,  1810.  Retired  as  lieutenant-colonel,  31st  of  January, 
1811. 

DOUGAL.  S.  B.  Dougal.  Ensign,  14th  of  September,  1855.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Indian  Mutiny  cam- 
paign of  1858-59,  and  was  present  at  the  capture  of  Lucknow. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  He  was  killed  in  action,  6th  of  November, 
1863,  in  India,  during  the  Umbeyla  campaign,  whilst  attached 
to  the  71st  Highlanders. 

DOUGLAS.  Charles  John  Cathcart  Douglas.  2nd  lieutenant  from 
the  74th  Highlanders,  5th  of  October,  1878 ;  exchanged  to  the 
31st  regiment,  6th  of  December,  1879. 

DOUGLAS.  John  Douglas.  Ensign,  25th  of  June,  1829  ;  lieutenant, 
25th  of  October,  1833;  captain,  llth  of  May,  1839;  exchanged 
to  the  llth  Light  Dragoons. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  233 

DOUGLAS.  John  Douglas.  Ensign,  13th  of  March,  1835  ;  lieutenant, 
26th  of  May,  1838 ;  captain,  15th  of  June,  1842.  Retired  the 
14th  of  November,  1842. 

DOUGLAS.  Sir  John  Douglas,  G.  C.  B.,  of  Glenfinart,  Argyleshire. 
Ensign,  6th  of  September,  1833  ;  lieutenant,  18th  of  July, 
1836;  captain  8th  of  June,  1841;  major,  24th  of  December, 
1852 ;  lieutenant-colonel,  13th  of  August,  1854  ;  colonel,  1st  of 
August,  1857  ;  major-general,  23rd  of  August,  1877  ;  general, 
30th  of  January,  1880  ;  full  colonel  commanding  the  79th 
Highlanders  1st  of  January,  1879.  He  served  throughout  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  in  command  of  the  79th  High- 
landers, including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  of 
Sebastopol,  assault  of  the  18th  of  June,  and  expedition  to  Kertch 
and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  C.B.,  Sardinian  and 
Turkish  medals,  and  4th  class  of  the  Medjidie.)  Served  in  the 
Indian  campaign  of  1857-59  ;  commanded  the  Infantry  in  the 
action  of  Secundra ;  commanded  a  brigade  during  the  siege  of 
Lucknow,  taking  the  Residency,  Iron  bridge,  Great  Imambara, 
and  several  other  important  positions ;  afterwards  commanded 
the  Infantry  of  the  Azimghur  Field  Force,  and  was  present  in  the 
action  at  Tigra,  taking  of  Azimghur,  pursuit  of  Koer  Sing,  actions 
at  Azimghur,  Munnear,  Sheoporeghat,  and  various  operations  in 
and  around  Jugdespore  and  the  jungles,  and  pursuit  to  Buxar. 
On  the  15th  of  June,  1858,  he  was  appointed  to  command  the 
troops  in  the  Azimghur  and  Jaunpore  districts,  and  on  the  25th 
of  June  to  the  command  of  the  disturbed  districts  of  Behar, 
Dinapore,  Ghazepore,  and  Shahabad,  and  was  constantly 
engaged  in  pursuing  the  rebels  during  the  hot  and  wet  seasons  ; 
took  the  field  after  the  rains,  defeated  the  rebels  at  Karisath, 
and  drove  them  into  the  jungle ;  took  Judgespore,  pursued 
and  drove  the  rebels  into  the  Kymore  hills,  killing  1,200; 
campaign  of  Kymore  hills ;  and  successful  night  attack  at 
Salya  Duhar.  On  the  15th  of  January,  1859,  appointed  to 
command  the  troops  in  Palamow  and  Chota  Nagpore,  and  was 
engaged  in  pursuing  the  rebels  in  Palamow.  (Frequently 


234  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

mentioned  in   despatches,  thanked  by  the    Governor-General 
of  India,  brevet  of  colonel,  K.C.B.  medal  with  clasp.) 

DOUGLAS.  Sir  Neil  Douglas,  K.C.B.,  K.C.  H.  Ensign,  28th  of  January, 
1801  ;  lieutenant,  16th  of  July,  1802  ;  captain,  19th  of  April, 
1804;  major,  31st  of  January,  1811  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  3rd  of 
December,  1812  ;  colonel  and  aide-de-camp  to  the  King,  27th 
of  May,  1825;  major-general,  10th  of  January,  1837;  governor 
of  Edinburgh  Castle,  17th  of  February,  1837 ;  lieutenant- 
general,  9th  of  November,  1846  ;  colonel,  78th  Highlanders, 
20th  of  December,  1851.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen  ;  expedition  to  Sweden 
in  1808  ;  Walcheren  expedition  and  siege  of  Flushing.  He 
accompanied  the  expedition  to  Cadiz.  Served  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  succeeding  to  the  command  of  the 
regiment,  on  the  20th  of  February,  1813.  He  was  present  at 
the  battles  of  Corunna,  Busaco,  (twice  wounded)  Pyrenees, 
Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.  He  commanded  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Waterloo  campaign,  and  was  severely 
wounded  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras.  He  had  the  gold 
medal  and  clasps  for  the  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse, 
and  the  silver  war  medal  and  clasps  for  Corunna  and  Busaco, 
He  was  also  in  possession  of  the  silver  Waterloo  medal,  cross  of 
the  4th  class  of  the  order  of  St.  Vladimir,  and  cross  of  Knight 
Companion  of  Maria  Theresa. 

DOUGLAS-HAMILTON.  Angus  Falconer  Douglas-Hamilton.  Lieu- 
tenant, 23rd  of  August,  1884.  He  served  with  the  regiment 
during  the  latter  part  of  the  Nile  expedition  in  1885.  (Medal 
with  clasp).  Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  at  Kosheh  during 
its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

DRYSDALE.  Andrew  Knox  Drysdale.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon, 
to  the  79th,  November,  1854;  surgeon,  10th  of  May,  1864. 
Died  10th  of  September,  1869  He  served  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  235 

battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  and  the  siege  of  Sebastopol. 
(Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Served  in  the 
Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of 
Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

DUFF.  Alexander  Garden  Duff,  of  Hatton  Castle.  Captain 
in  the  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  major,  28th  of  Vlay, 

1882. 

DUFF.  Garden  Duff.  Ensign,  28th  of  December,  1855  ;  lieutenant, 
28th  of  October,  1859 ;  exchanged  to  the  70th  regiment, 
1860.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Indian  campaign  of 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal 
and  clasp.) 

DUNDAS.  Thomas  Dundas.  Ensign,  10th  of  November,  1837  ; 
lieutenant,  21st  of  February,  1840  ;  transferred  to  the  22nd 
regiment. 

DURANT.  Celestine  George  Durant.  Lieutenant  from  the  94th 
regiment,  8th  of  December,  1854.  Retired  in  1859. 

EDEN.  William  Eden.  Appointed  major  in  the  regiment,  16th 
of  December,  1795  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  15th  of  August,  1798  ; 
exchanged  to  the  84th  regiment,  llth  of  December,  1806.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  Holland,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee.  Accompanied  the  79th 
Highlanders  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 

EGAN.  Michael  Egan.  Appointed  surgeon  to  the  79th,  7th  of 
December,  1797.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  Holland 
and  Egypt,  1801,  and  was  wounded  at  the  battle  before 
Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  died  in 
Belgium. 

EGERTON.  Arthur  Frederick  Egerton.  Lieutenant,  27th  of  October, 
1886. 


236  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

ELLIOT.  Edmund  James  Elliot.  Ensign,  1831  ;  lieutenant,  10th  of 
October,  1834;  captain,  3rd  of  April,  1840;  major,  12th  of 
April,  1844 ;  succeeded  as  lieutenant-colonel  to  command  the 
regiment  24th  of  December,  1852.  He  died  of  cholera  at 
Givrakla,  near  Varna,  12th  of  August,  1854. 

ELPHINSTONE.  Honourable  Y.  D.  Elphinstone  (Master  of  Elphin- 
stone.)  Lieutenant  in  the  2nd  battalion,  22nd  of  November, 
1884.  Retired  in  1886. 

EMSLIE.  John  Emslie.  Quarter-Master,  2nd  battalion,  13th  of  April, 
1887.  He  served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout 
the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
of  Tel-el- Kebir ;  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star)  also 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  He 
served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  of  1885-86,  was  present  at  Kosheh 
during  its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 
(Mentioned  in  despatches,  silver  medal  for  distinguished 
conduct  in  the  field.) 

EVERETT.  Edward  Everett.  Ensign,  1st  of  March,  1855;  lieuten- 
ant, 14th  of  September,  1855  ;  captain,  2nd  of  May,  1865  ; 
major,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  15th  of  June,  1885. 
Served  in  the  Crimea  with  the  79th  Highlanders  after  the  fall  of 
Sebastopol.  Served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Luck- 
now,  attack  on  the  fort  of  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge, 
Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  Forts  Bunniar 
and  Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of 
Rampore  Kussia,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude  across 
the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Mentioned  in  despatches, 
medal  and  clasp.)  Served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of 
1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders.  (Mentioned  in 
despatches,  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel,  medal  and  clasp.) 
Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  237 

Force  in  1885-86,  and  was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  invest- 
ment, commanded  the  reconnaissance  of  the  16th  of  December, 
and  the  right  attack,  consisting  of  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
and  the  9th  Soudanese,  on  the  village  of  Kosheh  in  the 
engagement  at  Giniss.  (D.S.O.,  mentioned  in  despatches,  3rd 
class  of  the  Medjidie.)  Lieutenant-Colonel  commanding  the 
regiment,  July  1st,  1887. 

EWART.  John  Spencer  Ewart.  Lieutenant,  22nd  of  October,  1881. 
Served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian 
war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 
(Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  throughout 
the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 
(Clasp.)  Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86  as  adjutant  of  the  Cameron 
Highlanders,  was  staff-officer  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment, 
and  was  present  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in 
despatches,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie.) 

EWART.  Walter  Douglas  Ewart.  Lieutenant,  7th  of  February,  1885. 
Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  in  1885-86  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  was  present 
in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 
(Medal.) 

FAIRRIE.  William  McCormick  Fairrie.  Ensign,  30th  of  May,  1845  ; 
lieutenant,  9th  of  June,  1846.  Retired  in  1846. 

FERGUSON.  Charles  Robert  Kennett  Ferguson.  Ensign,  14th  of 
January,  1862  ;  lieutenant,  22nd  of  August,  1865.  Retired  the 
12th  of  May,  1875. 

FERGUSON.  Arthur  George  Ferguson.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st 
of  July,  1881  ;  appointed  to  the  Rifle  Brigade,  16th  of  May, 
1883. 

FERGUSON.  James  Ferguson.  Ensign,  22nd  of  July,  1832 ; 
lieutenant,  7th  of  August,  1835  ;  captain,  18th  of  September, 
1840 ;  major,  25th  of  August,  1846.  Died  at  Givrakla,  near 
Varna,  Turkey,  1854. 


238  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

FERGUSON.  Robert  Ferguson,  of  Raith.  Ensign,  24th  of  February, 
1820,  in  the  43rd  regiment;  exchanged  as  major  to  the  79th, 
23rd  of  March,  1827;  lieutenant-colonel,  13th  of  March,  1835. 
Retired  the  8th  of  June,  1841. 

FERGUSON.  Robert  Ferguson.  Ensign,  25th  of  October,  1833 ; 
lieutenant,  8th  of  July,  1837;  captain,  28th  of  December,  1841. 
Died  in  1847. 

FERGUSON.  Sir  Ronald  Crawford  Ferguson,  G.  C.  B.,  of  Raith. 
Ensign,  53rd  regiment,  3rd  of  April,  1790  ;  general,  22nd  of 
July,  1830  ;  appointed  full  colonel  of  the  79th,  24th  of  March, 
1828.  Died  the  10th  of  April,  1841.  He  served  in  Flanders  in 
1793,  and  was  present  at  the  siege  of  Valenciennes  and  Dunkirk, 
and  at  the  defence  of  Newport.  (Severely  wounded.)  In  1796 
he  accompanied  the  expedition  for  the  capture  of  the  Cape  of 
Good  Hope,  and  in  1800  served  with  the  force  sent  under  Sir 
James  Palt  for  the  purpose  of  attacking  Ferrol  and  Cadiz.  In 
1805  he  was  appointed  to  the  command  of  the  Highland 
Brigade  in  the  expedition  of  Sir  David  Baird,  for  the  re-capture 
of  the  Cape  of  Good  Hope,  in  which  service  he  highly 
distinguished  himself.  In  1808  he  was  promoted  to  major- 
general,  and  commanded  a  brigade  in  the  Peninsula  at  the 
battles  of  Roleia  and  Vimiera.  (Thanked  by  both  Houses  of 
Parliament,  and  granted  a  gold  medal  by  George  III.).  In 
1815  he  was  nominated  a  K.C.B.,  and  subsequently  given  the 
Grand  Cross  of  the  Order. 

FERGUSSON.  Archibald  Fergusson.  Ensign,  6th  of  June,  1845; 
lieutenant,  26th  of  June,  1846  ;  exchanged  to  the  16th  regiment. 

FERGUSSON.  James  Fergusson,  C.B.  Appointed  as  a  major  to  the 
79th  from  the  43rd  regiment,  3rd  of  December,  1812.  Appointed 
to  the  85th  regiment,  25th  of  January,  1813.  Had  previously 
served  in  the  18th  regiment.  He  served  in  the  Walcheren 
expedition  in  1809  and  throughout  the  Peninsular  war.  He 
was  present  at  the  battles  of  Vimiera,  Corunna,  Busaco,  Fuentes 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  239 

d'Onor;  sieges  of  Ciudad  Rodrigo  and  Badajoz;  battles  of 
Salamanca,  Nivelle,  Nive ;  passage  of  the  Bidassoa ;  and  actions 
at  Pombal,  Redinha,  Miranda  de  Corvo,  Foz  d'Aronce,  Sabugal, 
and  San  Munoz.  He  was  five  times  wounded.  (Gold  medal 
for  Badajoz,  and  the  silver  war  medal  with  eight  clasps.) 

FINDLAY.  Charles  Findlay.  Lieutenant,  12th  of  March,  1884,  from 
the  Gordon  Highlanders.  Served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition 
of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 
Also  served  with  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1886. 

FITZGERALD.  Massey  FitzGerald.  Ensign,  30th  of  June,  1823; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  June,  1829;  half  pay,  7th  of  July,  1837. 

FORBES.  Alexander  Forbes.  Ensign,  28th  of  September,  1809; 
lieutenant,  8th  of  August,  1811 ;  captain,  18th  of  March,  1825; 
major,  7th  of  August,  1835;  half  pay,  25th  of  May,  1838. 
Died  in  Canada,  30th  of  March,  1851.  He  served  with  the 
79th  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Nivelle 
and  Nive,  also  throughout  the  Waterloo  campaign,  being 
slightly  wounded  at  Waterloo.  He  had  the  silver  war  medal 
with  two  clasps. 

FORBES.  Granville  Eardley  Forbes.  2nd  lieutenant,  23rd  of  October, 
1880;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Served  throughout  the 
Nile  expedition  in  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 
(Medal  with  clasp.) 

FORBES.  Hon.  John  Forbes.  Exchanged  as  a  lieutenant  to  the  79th 
1st  of  November,  1833,  and  died  two  years  afterwards. 

FORBES.  Michie  Forbes.  Ensign,  81st  of  December,  1830 : 
exchanged  to  the  35th  regiment,  18th  of  May,  1833. 

FORBES.  Peter  Forbes.  Quarter-master,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July, 
1881.  Retired  in  1887.  Served  with  the  71st  Highlanders  in 
the  Eastern  campaign  of  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of 


240  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Sebastopol  and  expedition  to  Kertch.  (Medal  with  clasp  and 
Turkish  medal.)  Served  also  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858, 
including  the  actions  of  Kooneh,  Deapoza,  and  Gowlowlee,  and 
capture  of  Galpee  and  Gwalior.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Served 
in  the  Umbeyla  campaign  with  the  71st  Highlanders.  (Medal 
and  clasp.) 

FORBES-GORDON.  Arthur  Newton  Forbes-Gordon,  of  Rayne.  Ensign, 
12th  of  May,  1863  ;  lieutenant,  llth  of  January,  1867  ;  captain, 
13th  of  July,  1878.  Retired,  15th  of  March,  1879.  Adjutant, 
from  the  26th  of  July,  1876,  to  the  13th  of  July,  1878. 

FORBES-SEMPILL.  Hon.  John  Forbes-Sempill,  Master  of  Sempill. 
Lieutenant,  6th  of  January,  1886.  Served  in  the  operations  of 
the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1886  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders. 

FORD.  John  Ford,  Ensign,  25th  of  May,  1809 ;  lieutenant,  30th  ot 
May,  1811 ;  exchanged  to  the  3rd  West  India  Regiment,  15th 
of  November,  1821.  He  served  in  the  expeditions  to  Walcheren 
and  Cadiz ;  also  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula, 
being  present  at  the  battles  of  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Nivelle,  Nive, 
and  Toulouse.  (Silver  medal  with  four  clasps.) 

FORREST.  William  Forrest  (now  Sir  William  Forrest,  Bart.,  of 
Comiston).  Ensign,  14th  of  October,  1842;  lieutenant,  30th 
of  May,  1845.  Retired,  1st  of  October,  1850. 

FOWLER.  Henry  Day  Fowler.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon,  19th  of 
December,  1845 ;  exchanged  to  the  8th  regiment  in  1850. 

ERASER.  Archibald  Fraser.  Ensign,  24th  of  April,  1805  ;  lieutenant, 
23rd  of  October,  1806.  Served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in 
the  Peninsula,  and  was  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor. 
He  died  of  fever  at  Castel  Branco,  Portugal,  1 5th  of  September, 
1811. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  241 

FRASER.  James  Fraser.  Ensign,  30th  of  April,  1807  ;  lieutenant, 
16th  of  March.  1809  ;  captain,  3rd  of  June,  1819.  Retired  on 
the  2nd  of  February,  1830.  Died  on  the  29th  of  May,  1849. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  throughout  the  Peninsular 
and  Waterloo  campaigns,  being  severely  wounded  at  the  battles 
of  Toulouse  and  Quatre  Bras. 

FRASER.  Malcolm  Fraser.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800;  lieutenant, 
9th  of  February,  1804  :  captain,  29th  of  November,  1810. 
Died  in  1822.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  throughout 
the  Peninsular  and  Waterloo  campaigns.  He  was  slightly 
wounded  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and  severely  at  the 
battle  of  Quatre  Bras. 

FRASER.  William  Wemyss  Fraser.  Ensign,  29th  of  November,  1815 ; 
half  pay,  25th  of  February,  1816. 

FRASER.  Keith  Fraser.  2nd  lieutenant  in  the  2nd  battalion,  12th 
of  February,  1887. 

FRASER-TYTLER.  Edward  Fraser-Tytler,  of  Aldourie.  Lieutenant, 
2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  captain,  24th  of  August,  1882. 
Retired  in  1887. 

FRASER-TYTLER.  William  Fraser-Tytler.  Lieutenant,  1st  of  July, 
1881.  Retired  in  1884. 

FREME.  James  Herbert  Freme.  Ensign,  19th  of  October,  1849  ; 
lieutenant,  3rd  of  March,  1854 ;  captain,  29th  of  December, 
1854.  Retired  in  1856.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and 
Balaclava  and  the  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  three 
clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.) 

FULTON.  Robert  Fulton.  Appointed  captain  in  the  79th,  10th  of 
July,  1800;  major,  25th  of  March,  1805;  lieutenant-colonel, 
28th  of  May,  1807.  Retired  on  the  3rd  of  December,  1812. 
Died  near  Lochwinnoch,  Ayrshire,  in  1851.  He  served  with 

R 


242  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  expedition  to  Egypt  in  1801. 
(Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Was  present  at  the 
bombardment  of  Copenhagen ;  commanded  the  79th  High- 
landers in  the  Peninsula  from  the  2nd  of  September,  1811, 
until  the  20th  of  February,  1813,  including  the  battle  of 
Salamanca,  for  which  he  was  granted  a  gold  medal. 

FULTON.  Robert  Fulton.  Ensign,  12th  of  February,  1825 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 9th  of  December,  1826;  captain,  16th  of  March,  1832. 
Died  at  Paisley. 

GAISFORD.  Thomas  Gaisford.  Appointed  lieutenant  from  the  22nd 
regiment  on  the  4th  of  January,  1841 ;  captain,  4th  of  July, 
1845.  Retired  in  1846. 

GARFORTH.  William  H.  Garforth.  Captain,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of 
July,  1881. 

GARSIA.  Christopher  Garsia.  Ensign,  23rd  of  March,  1858 ;  lieu- 
tenant, llth  of  October,  1859;  exchanged  to  the  89th  regiment 
in  1864. 

GAWNE.  Edward  Gawne.  Ensign,  16th  of  January,  1855  ;  lieutenant, 
9th  of  March,  1855.  Retired  in  1859. 

GORDON.  C.  Van  R.  Conway  Gordon.  Ensign,  12th  of  January, 
1855;  lieutenant,  4th  of  May,  1855;  captain,  3rd  of  April, 
1860  ;  went  to  the  Bengal  Staff  Corps  on  the  22nd  of  March, 
1869. 

GORDON.  Lawrence  Gordon.  Ensign,  29th  of  May,  1818;  exchanged 
to  the  89th  regiment  on  the  13th  of  December,  1821. 

GORDON.  John  Henry  Gordon.  Ensign,  28th  of  December,  1841. 
Retired  on  the  13th  of  October,  1843. 

GORDON.  George  James  Gordon.  Ensign,  2nd  of  February,  1830; 
lieutenant,  18th  of  July,  1834  ;  captain,  21st  of  February,  1840, 
Retired  on  the  29th  of  January,  1841, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  243 

GORDON.  Orr  Boswell  Gordon.  Ensign,  4th  of  July,  1865 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 17th  of  February,  1869  ;  captain,  19th  of  October,  1879; 
major,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  adjutant  from  the  13th  of  July,  1878, 
to  18th  of  October,  1879.  Served  with  the  Cameron  High- 
landers in  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and,  as  divisional  baggage- 
master  on  the  staff  of  Lieutenant-General  Hamley  from  Ismailia 
to  Cairo.  Was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal 
with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.) 

GRAEME.  Patrick  James  Frederick  Graeme,  of  Inchbrakie.  Ensign, 
19th  of  February,  1870;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871. 
Retired  in  1875. 

GRAHAM.  John  Graham.  Lieutenant,  6th  of  June,  1794.  Retired 
in  1797. 

GRAHAM.  William  Graham.  Ensign,  24th  of  August,  1793  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 24th  of  June,  1795.  Retired  in  1799. 

GRAHAM.  Archibald  Graham.  Lieutenant,  24th  of  August,  1795. 
Retired  in  1795. 

GRAHAM.  Oliver  Graham.  Ensign,  12th  of  April,  1844;  lieutenant, 
14th  of  November,  1845.  Retired  in  1850. 

GRANT.  Charles  Irwin  Grant.  Ensign,  18th  of  July,  1834 ;  exchanged 
to  the  50th  regiment,  10th  of  November,  1837. 

GRANT.  Ewen  Grant.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881. 
Retired  in  1883. 

GRANT.  Francis  Augustus  Grant.  Ensign,  llth  of  June,  1847; 
lieutenant,  26th  of  July,  1850.  Died  of  cholera  before  Sebas- 
topol,  October,  1854. 

GRANT.  Hugh  Grant.  Ensign,  5th  of  September,  1805;  lieutenant, 
30th  of  April,  1807.  Served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the 
Peninsula,  and  died  of  wounds  received  at  the  siege  of  Burgos 
in  1812, 


244  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

GRANT.  Ian  Robert  James  Murray  Grant,  of  Glenmoriston  and  Moy. 
2nd  lieutenant,  17th  of  April,  1880  ;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July, 
1881  ;  resigned  his  commission  on  the  6th  of  October,  1886. 
Served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian 
war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 
(Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  with  the  Nile 
expedition  in  1884.  Is  now  a  captain  in  the  2nd  battalion. 

GRANT.     John  Grant.     Appointed  surgeon,  10th  of  July,  1846. 

GRANT.  Robert  W.  E.  Grant,  of  Kincorth.  Lieutenant,  2nd  bat- 
talion, 1st  of  July,  1881.  Retired  in  1884. 

GRANT.  William  Grant.  Appointed  assistant- surgeon,  25th  of 
December,  1825  ;  exchanged  to  the  10th  regiment  in  1826. 

GRAVES.  William  Graves.  Ensign,  7th  of  December,  1809. 
Retired  in  1810. 

GREENHILL-GARDYNE.  Norman  Charles  Greenhill-Gardyne.  Lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Appointed  to  the 
Gordon  Highlanders  in  1885. 

GUNNING.  Matthew  Gunning.  Ensign,  8th  of  August,  1799  •  lieu- 
tenant, 4th  of  September,  1801  ;  exchanged  to  the  92nd 
Highlanders  the  same  year.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
in  the  expedition  to  Ferrol  in  1800,  and  accompanied  the  92nd 
Highlanders  to  Egypt  in  1801. 

HALKETT.  Wedderburn  Conway  Halkett  (eldest  son  of  Sir  Arthur 
Halkett,  Bart.,  of  Pitfirrane,  Fife).  2nd  lieutenant,  16th  of 
February,  1878;  lieutenant,  17th  of  December,  1879;  captain, 
20th  of  February,  1884.  He  served  with  the  Cameron  High- 
landers during  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  Was  invalided, 
and  died  on  the  23rd  of  August,  1885. 

HALL.  James  Hall.  Ensign,  21st  of  February,  1811  ;  lieutenant, 
14th  of  October,  1812;  half  pay,  March,  1815, 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  245 

HAMILTON.  Andrew  Hamilton.  Joined  the  79th  from  the  Canadian 
Fencibles  as  lieutenant,  25th  of  March,  1805  ;  exchanged  to 
the  72nd  regiment  on  the  26th  of  December,  1805.  He  was 
afterwards  in  the  Peninsula  with  the  23rd  Light  Dragoons. 

HAMILTON.  Peter  D.  Hamilton.  Exchanged  to  the  79th,  as  captain, 
from  the  39th  regiment,  14th  of  February,  1799.  He  left  the 
regiment  in  1800. 

HAMILTON.  Robert  Hamilton.  Lieutenant,  29th  of  April,  1795; 
captain,  24th  of  May,  1799 ;  major,  25th  of  April,  1805 ; 
exchanged  to  the  78th  Highlanders,  21st  of  April,  1808.  Died 
in  Canada.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  Egypt  in 
1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold 
medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 

HAMILTON.  William  Finlay  Hamilton.  Ensign,  21st  of  August, 
1840;  lieutenant,  14th  of  October,  1842.  Retired  on  the 
30th  of  May,  1845. 

HAMILTON.  T.  A.  Hamilton.  Quarter-master,  14th  of  March,  1811. 
Died  in  Portugal,  28th  of  December,  1812. 

HANBURY.  John  M.  Hanbury.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of 
July,  1881.  Retired  in  1883. 

HARKNESS.  Thomas  Harkness.  Ensign,  6th  of  June,  1811  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 25th  of  June,  1812.  Died  same  year. 

HARRISSON.  Charles  Milne  Harrisson.  Ensign,  3rd  of  November, 
1846  ;  lieutenant,  29th  of  October,  1848.  Retired  in  1855. 

HARRISON.  Francis  Joseph  Harrison.  Ensign,  30th  of  July,  1847; 
lieutenant,  1st  of  October,  1850.  Died  in  the  Crimea. 

HARRISON.  George  Alexander  Harrison.  Ensign,  23rd  of  November, 
1852  ;  lieutenant,  8th  of  August,  1854;  captain,  13th  of  July, 
1855  ;  placed  on  half  pay  on  the  10th  of  November,  1856  ;  re- 
appointed  to  the  regiment,  and  retired  in  1866. 


246  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

HARRISON.  George  Harrison.  Ensign,  10th  of  December,  1812  ; 
lieutenant,  2nd  of  March,  1815  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  March,  1817. 
Drowned  at  sea,  1819.  Served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula 
and  at  the  battles  of  Waterloo  and  Quatre  Bras. 

HART.  William  Neville  Hart.  Appointed  captain  in  the  79th  High- 
landers, 17th  of  September,  1794.  Left  the  regiment  in  1796. 

HARVEY.  William  Maundy  Harvey.  Appointed  major  in  the  79th 
Highlanders  from  the  1st  West  India  Regiment,  27th  of 
February,  1806  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  30th  of  May,  1811 ;  colonel, 
1st  of  January,  1812.  He  died  on  passage  home  from  the 
Peninsula,  10th  of  June,  1813.  He  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Albuhera  and  at  the  storming  of  Badajos. 

HAY.  James  Hay,  C.B.  Major-general,  23rd  of  November,  1841 ; 
Colonel  of  the  79th,  8th  of  January,  1849.  He  served  with  the 
16th  Lancers  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  passage 
of  the  Douro,  battles  of  Talavera,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Vittoria,  and 
Nive,  the  siege  of  Burgos,  and  actions  of  Sabugal,  Rediuha, 
and  Foz  d'Aronce.  (Gold  medal  for  Nive.)  He  commanded 
the  16th  Lancers  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo.  (Very  severely 
wounded,  C.B.,  and  silver  medal.)  Died  in  1855. 

HAYWARD.  George  J.  Whitaker  Hay  ward.  Ensign,  12th  of  January, 
1859;  lieutenant,  24th  of  March,  1863.  Retired  in  1865. 
Murdered  in  Cashmere. 

HICKS.  Raymond  Hicks.  Appointed  lieutenant,  12th  of  March, 
1796.  Left  the  regiment  in  1798. 

HILL.  Andrew  Hill.  Ensign,  31st  of  December,  1847  ;  exchanged 
to  the  22nd  regiment. 

HODGSON.  William  Chauval  Hodgson.  Ensign,  18th  of  September, 
1840;  lieutenant,  10th  of  February,  1843;  captain,  llth  of 
June,  1847  ;  major,  2nd  of  August,  1857  ;  lieutenant-colonel, 
10th  of  July,  1860;  colonel,  10th  of  July,  1865.  He  served 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  247 

with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of 
1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava;  expedi- 
tion to  Kertch  and  Yenikale ;  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol ; 
and  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  8th  of  September.  (Medal 
with  three  clasps,  brevet  of  major,  Knight  of  the  Legion  of 
Honour,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish  medal.) 
Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow ;  attack  on  the  fort  at  Rooyah ;  actions 
at  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore  ;  capture  of  forts 
Bunniar  and  Mahomdie ;  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad  ; 
capture  of  Rampore  Kussia  ;  and  subsequent  operations  in 
Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 
Died  at  Parkhurst  in  1873,  whilst  in  command  of  the  regiment. 

HOLE.  George  Hole.  Ensign,  5th  of  September,  1795.  Left  the 
regiment  in  1798. 

HOLFORD.  Henry  Price  Holford.  Ensign,  7th  of  March,  1856  ; 
went  to  the  10th  Hussars  in  1859.  He  served  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858,  including  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

HOLMES.  Arthur  L'Estrange  Holmes.  Lieutenant  from  the  7th 
Hussars,  18th  of  September,  1865;  captain,  15th  of  December, 
1869  ;  transferred  to  Bengal  Staff  Corps,  26th  of  July,  1870. 

HORSFORD.  Sir  Alfred  Horsford,  G.C.B.  Colonel  commanding  the 
79th,  17th  of  March,  1876  ;  general,  1st  of  October,  1877  ; 
colonel  commanding  the  rifle  brigade,  21st  of  November,  1880. 
Served  with  the  rifle  brigade  in  the  Kaffir  war  of  1846-47,  and 
commanded  the  1st  battalion  in  that  of  1852-53.  (Medal  and 
brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel.)  Also  commanded  the  1st  bat- 
talion in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854,  including  the  battles 
of  Alma,  Balaclava,  and  Inkerman,  and  siege  of  Sebastopol. 
(Medal  with  four  clasps,  C.B.,  Sardinian  and  Turkish  medals, 
and  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign 
of  1857-59 ;  commanded  3rd  battalion  rifle  brigade  at  the 


248  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

battle  of  Cawnpore  on  the  6th  of  December,  1857  (wounded) ; 
commanded  a  brigade  from  February,  1858,  to  the  end  of  the 
war,  and  was  present  throughout  the  Oude  campaign  ;  com- 
manded the  infantry  at  the  battle  of  Nawabgunge ;  in  February, 
1859,  was  left  in  command  of  the  Oude  and  Nepaul  frontier, 
and  on  one  occasion  took  sixteen  guns  in  an  engagement  in 
Nepaul  against  the  rebels.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  K.C.B.) 

HOWARD.  William  Howard.  Quarter-master,  20th  of  April,  1878. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  latter  part  of  the  Indian 
Mutiny  campaign.  Served  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882 
with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star).  Also 
served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  in  1885-86,  and  was 
present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement 
at  Giniss. 

HOWKINS.  Theophilus  Robert  Howkins.  Ensign,  28th  of  February, 
1855  ;  lieutenant,  7th  of  December,  1865.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  in  1855,  including  the  siege 
and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Turkish  medal.) 

HUGHES.  Paul  Hughes.  Ensign,  12th  of  March,  1818  :  exchanged 
to  the  93rd  Highlanders,  18th  of  July,  1822. 

HUME.  Arthur  Hume.  Ensign,  29th  of  July,  1859  ;  lieutenant,  29th 
of  July,  1862  ;  captain,  29th  of  July,  1871  ;  half  pay,  31st  of 
October,  1874.  He  was  adjutant  from  1862  to  1871. 

HUME.  J.  Robert  Hume,  M.D.,  C.B.  Appointed  surgeon  of  the 
79th,  25th  of  March,  1805;  staff-surgeon,  17th  of  August,  1809. 
Served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was 
present  at  the  battles  of  Corunna,  Barrosa,  Salamanca,  Vittoria, 
Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  Orthes,  and  Toulouse.  (Medal  with 
ten  clasps.)  He  was  also  present  as  deputy-inspector  of 
hospitals  at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  (Medal.) 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  249 

HUNT.  Andrew  Hunt.  Ensign,  22nd  of  February,  1840;  lieutenant, 
15th  of  June,  1842  ;  captain,  25th  of  August,  1846  ;  major,  12th. 
of  December,  1854  ;  half  pay,  7th  of  September,  1855.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battle  of  Alma,  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale,  and  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  two  clasps, 
5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish  medal.) 

HUNT.  James  Maitland  Hunt.  Sub-lieutenant,  12th  of  January, 
1873;  lieutenant,  12th  of  February,  1874;  captain,  12th  of 
February,  1881  ;  brevet-major,  18th  of  November,  1882 ; 
major,  1st  of  December,  1886.  He  served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  des- 
patches, brevet  of  major,  medal  with  clasp,  4th  class  of  the 
Medjidie,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  throughout  the 
Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  throughout  the 
operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86  with 
the  Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was  present  at  Kosheh  during 
its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

HUTTON.  Alfred  Hutton.  Ensign,  31st  of  May,  1859;  lieutenant, 
14th  of  January,  1862  ;  went  to  7th  Hussars  in  1864. 

IMLACH.  James  Imlach.  Ensign,  2nd  of  April,  1806;  lieutenant, 
10th  of  May,  1807  ;  exchanged  to  a  Cape  regiment  in  1808. 

IMLACH.  William  Imlach.  Ensign,  20th  of  February  1796  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 3rd  of  October,  1799;  Captain,  14th  of  April,  1805. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  Holland  in  1799,  and 
was  present  at  Egmont-op-Zee.  He  accompanied  the  regiment 
to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria. 
(Gold  Medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  was  present  with 
the  regiment  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen  in  1807,  and 
served  with  it  in  the  Peninsula.  He  was  killed  at  the  battle  of 
Fuentes  d'Onor  on  the  3rd  of  May,  1811. 


250  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

INNES.  Peter  Innes.  Lieutenant  from  the  42nd  Highlanders,  9th  of 
July,  1803;  captain  4th  of  September,  1805.  Half  pay  20th 
of  November,  1816.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in 
the  Peninsula,  being  wounded  at  Toulouse,  and  at  the  battles 
of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  He  died  at  Tunnach,  near 
Wick,  on  the  19th  of  April,  1822. 

ISHAM.  Thomas  Isham.  Ensign,  1st  of  August,  1826  ;  lieutenant, 
16th  of  March,  1832  ;  captain,  26th  of  May,  1838  ;  major  14th 
of  June,  1842.  Retired  on  the  12th  of  April,  1844. 

JAMESON.  Robert  Jameson.  Quarter-master,  llth  of  May,  1849. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  expedition  to 
Kertch  and  Yenikale,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  assaults 
of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  Sardinian  and  Turkish  Medals.)  Appointed 
quarter-master,  Depot  Battalion,  Fort  George,  1857. 

JAMIESON.  Lachlan  Foster  Jamieson.  Ensign,  2nd  December,  1859; 
lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1864  ;  went  to  the  7th  Hussars  in 
1865. 

JOHNSON.  William  Johnson.  Appointed  captain,  13th  of  May,  1795. 
He  left  the  regiment  in  1799. 

JOHNSTON.  George  Johnston.  Lieutenant  from  the  68th  regiment, 
27th  of  April,  1827  ;  captain,  10th  of  October,  1834. 

JOHNSTONE.  Hon.  A.  C.  Johnstone.  Lieutenant-colonel,  2nd  of 
May,  1794.  He  left  the  regiment  in  1798. 

JOHNSTONE.  Charles  Johnstone.  Ensign,  14th  of  September,  1820; 
exchanged  to  the  69th  regiment  in  1823. 

JOHNSTONE.  John  Johnstone.  Appointed  captain,  7th  of  June, 
1794.  He  left  the  regiment  in  1796, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


251 


JONES.     Thomas  Sheridan  Gore  Jones.     Lieutenant  from  the  37th 
regiment,  1860.     He   was    killed   in   action   in    1863   in   the    . 
Umbeyla  campaign,  whilst  doing  duty  as  a  Volunteer  with  the 
71st  Highlanders.     He  had  previously  served  with  the  37th  in 
the  Indian  campaign  of  1857-58.     (Medal.) 

KEMBLE.  Horace  William  Kemble.  Captain,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of 
July,  1881. 

KENNEDY.  Ewen  Kennedy.  Ensign  3rd  of  October,  1811  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 25th  of  February,  1813.  He  served  with  the  regiment 
at  Quatre  Bras,  and  was  killed  at  Waterloo. 

KENNEDY.  James  Frederick  Shaw  Kennedy.  Ensign,  1st  of 
February,  1869  ;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871.  Retired 
on  the  1st  of  February,  1873. 

KERR.  William  James  Kerr.  Ensign,  15th  of  May,  1857.  Resigned 
his  commission  in  1859. 

KILGOUR.  Patrick  Kilgour.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon,  17th  of 
January,  1855.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow. 
(Medal  and  clasp.) 

KYNOCK.  John  Kynock.  Ensign,  15th  of  November,  1810  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 13th  of  June,  1811.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
in  the  Peninsula,  being  wounded  at  Toulouse.  He  became 
adjutant  of  the  regiment,  and  was  killed  at  the  battle  of  Quatre 
Bras. 

LANCE.  William  Henry  Lance.  Ensign,  7th  of  July,  1825  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  of  February,  1830 ;  captain,  7th  of  August,  1835. 
Retired  on  the  18th  of  September,  1840. 

LANGFORD- BROOKE.  H.  L.  B.  Langford- Brooke.  Captain,  2nd 
battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  honorary  major,  llth  of  August, 
1882.  Formerly  served  in  the  60th  Rifles. 


252  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

LANGLEY.  Frederick  Langley.  Exchanged  as  a  captain  from  the 
82nd  regiment,  10th  of  July,  1817.  Half  pay  on  the  17th  of 
June,  1819. 

LAWRIE.  Andrew  Lawrie.  Captain  from  the  61st  regiment,  19th  of 
April,  1804  ;  major,  4th  of  October,  1810.  He  served  with 
the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  killed  at  the 
siege  of  Burgos  on  the  22nd  of  September,  1812. 

I  AWRIE.  Francis  R.  Hastings  Lawrie.  Exchanged  as  captain  to  the 
79th,  from  the  llth  Light  Dragoons,  15th  of  November,  1839. 

LEADER.  Thomas  Leonard  Leader.  Exchanged  from  the  1st  Foot 
as  captain,  24th  July,  1846.  Retired  on  half  pay  in  1848. 
Served  in  the  campaign  of  1844-45  in  the  Southern  Concan 
Country. 

LEAPER.  William  Leaper.  Ensign,  29th  of  April,  1807;  lieutenant, 
15th  of  December,  1808;  captain,  12th  of  December,  1822. 
Half  pay  on  the  6th  of  October,  1825.  Died  in  1835.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Waterloo  campaign, 
and  was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras. 

LEITH.  John  Macdonald  Leith.  Ensign,  17th  of  March,  1854 ; 
lieutenant,  6th  of  October,  1854 ;  captain,  15th  of  May,  1857  ; 
major,  31st  of  October,  1877  ;  brevet-lieutenant-colonel,  30th  of 
December,  1878  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  1st  July,  1881  ;  colonel, 
31st  of  December,  1882.  Placed  on  half  pay  on  the  30th  of 
June,  1885.  He  served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55 
with  the  79th  Highlanders,  including  the  battle  of  Balaclava, 
siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and 
the  8th  of  September,  and  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale. 
(Medal  with  two  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish 
medal.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59  with  the 
regiment,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  attack 
on  the  Fort  of  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and 
Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  Forts  Bunniar  and  Mahomdie, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  2*53 

passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia, 
and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and 
Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Commanded  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches, 
C.B.,  Medal  with  clasp,  3rd  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  He  commanded  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85  (clasp),  and  was 
assistant-adjutant-general  of  the  Force  in  the  Eastern  Soudan 
in  1885.  (Clasp). 

LENON.  Arthur  Lenon.  Ensign,  2nd  of  July,  1861.  Retired  in 
1864. 

LESLIE.  Archibald  Young  Leslie,  of  Kininvie.  Transferred  as 
captain  from  the  23rd  Fusiliers  on  the  18th  of  December, 
1875  ;  major,  1st  of  July,  1881. 

LESLIE.  Kewan  Izod  Leslie.  Ensign,  21st  of  March,  1811  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 1st  of  April,  1812  ;  captain,  18th  of  October,  1815  ; 
half  pay  on  the  25th  of  March,  1817.  He  served  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula  and  Waterloo  campaigns,  and 
was  wounded  at  the  siege  of  Burgos.  (Silver  medal  for 
Peninsula  and  Waterloo.) 

LINDSAY.  S.  Charles  Lindsay.  Ensign,  21st  of  October,  1862. 
Retired  in  1863. 

LITHGOW.  Stewart  Aaron  Lithgow,  C.B.,  M.D.,  D.S.O.  Appointed 
surgeon  to  the  79th  Highlanders  on  the  20th  of  October,  1869. 
Surgeon-major  in  the  army,  1st  of  March,  1873.  He  served 
with  the  75th  regiment  during  the  Indian  campaign  of  1857-59, 
and  was  present  at  the  action  of  Budleekeserai ;  siege  and 
capture  of  Delhi  ;  actions  of  Bolunshuhur,  Agra,  Allygur, 
Akrabad,  and  Kanoy  ;  relief  of  Lucknow  by  Lord  Clyde,  and 
affairs  at  Dilkoosha  and  Alumbagh.  (Medal  with  two  clasps.) 
Served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  in  1884-85,  as  principal 


254  HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 

medical  officer  on  the  lines  of  communication.  (Mentioned  in 
despatches,  C.B.,  Medal  with  clasp.)  Also  served  with  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  including  the  engage- 
ment at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  D.S.O.). 

LOUTH.  Randal  P.  O.,  Lord  Louth.  Ensign,  12th  of  December, 
1851  ;  lieutenant,  17th  of  June,  1858;  exchanged  to  the  24th 
regiment  in  1861. 

LOVAT.  Simon,  Lord  Lovat,  A.D.C.  Lieutenant-colonel-comman- 
dant of  the  Highland  Light  Infantry  Militia,  10th  of  December, 
1855;  colonel  commanding  the  2nd  battalion  Cameron 
Highlanders,  1st  of  July,  1881. 

LUMSDEN.  Hugh  Robert  Lumsden,  younger,  of  Pitcaple.  Lieu- 
tenant, 18th  of  November,  1885.  Served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  in  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  in  1886.  (Medal.) 

LUNDY.  Edward  Louis  Lundy.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon  in  the 
79th,  7th  of  April,  1854  ;  went  to  the  64th  regiment  in  1855. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  during  the  Eastern  campaign  of 
1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege 
of  Sebastopol  (wounded  in  the  trenches  on  the  29th  of  July, 
1855),  and  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.) 

MACANDREW.  Henry  Y.  M.  Macandrew.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
6th  of  August,  1884. 

MACBEAN.     Charles  MacBean.     Lieutenant,  7th  of  October,  1807. 

MACDONALD.  James  Macdonald.  Lieutenant  from  the  21st  Foot, 
29th  of  March,  1827;  captain,  6th  of  December,  1833.  Retired 
on  the  29th  of  December,  1837. 

MACDONALD.  John  Andrew  Macdonald,  of  Glenaladale.  Major, 
2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  255 

MACDONELL.  Sir  James  Macdonell,  K,C.B.}  K.C.H.  Ensign,  25th 
of  January,  1796.  Became  lieutenant-general,  23rd  of  Novem- 
ber, 1841  ;  colonel  of  the  79th  Highlanders,  14th  of  July,  1842. 
He  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Maida,  Salamanca,  Vittoria, 
Nivelle,  and  Nive.  (Silver  medal  with  4  clasps.)  He  com- 
manded the  Coldstream  Guards  at  Waterloo,  and  was  celebrated 
for  having,  with  the  assistance  of  Sergeant  Graham  of  that 
regiment,  closed  the  gates  of  Huguomont  upon  the  French. 
He  was  selected  by  the  Duke  of  Wellington  to  receive  a  legacy 
of  ,£500,  left  by  the  Rev.  Mr.  Norcross  of  Framlingham, 
Suffolk,  "  to  the  bravest  man  in  England,"  which  legacy  was 
shared,  at  his  own  request,  with  Sergeant  Graham. 

MACDONELL.  Ronald  T.  Macdonell.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
28th  of  October,  1882. 

MACDONNELL.  Allan  Macdonnell.  Ensign,  2nd  of  April,  1812 ; 
lieutenant,  6th  of  January,  1814  ;  captain,  26th  of  November, 
1830.  Retired  on  the  18th  of  July,  1834.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  the 
Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.  (Wounded.) 

MACDONNELL.  Alexander  Michael  Macdonnell.  Ensign,  28th  of 
May,  1812;  lieutenant,  13th  of  January  1814.  Retired  on 
the  26th  of  July,  1815. 

MACDOUGALL.  Colin  Macdougall.  Captain  from  the  42nd  High- 
landers, 7th  of  September,  1815  ;  half  pay  on  the  25th  of 
February,  1816. 

MACDOUGALL.  Patrick  Leonard  MacDougall  (now  General  Sir 
Patrick  Leonard  MacDougall,  K.C.M.G.)  Ensign,  8th  of  July, 
1836;  lieutenant,  llth  of  May,  1839;  exchanged  to  the  36th 
regiment.  He  was  employed  on  particular  service  in  the 
Crimea,  acting  on  the  Quarter-Master-General's  staff  to  the 
Kertch  expedition,  and  at  the  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal 
with  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.) 


256  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

MAcDouGALL.  Sir  Duncan  MacDougall,  K.C.B.  Major  from  the 
85th  regiment,  16th  of  July,  1830;  lieutenant-colonel,  6th  of 
September,  1833.  Retired  on  the  13th  of  March,  1835; 
colonel  of  the  9th  regiment  of  the' British  Legion  in  Spain,  in 
1835.  Retired  from  Spanish  service  in  1836.  Sir  Duncan 
served  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of 
Salamanca,  (severely  wounded,)  Nivelle,  and  Nive,  and  at  the 
assault  on  St.  Sebastien.  (Medal  and  four  clasps.)  He  was 
also  in  possession  of  a  war  medal  for  service  with  the  Legion 
of  Spain. 

MACFADYEN.  Duncan  MacFadyen.  Surgeon,  2nd  battalion,  1st 
of  July,  1881. 

MACFARLAN.  Frederick  Alexander  MacFarlan.  Lieutenant,  20th 
of  May,  1885.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  and 
was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  at  the  recon- 
naissance on  the  16th  of  December,  and  at  the  engagement  at 
Giniss.  (Medal.) 

MACGILLIVRAY.  John  William  MacGillivray,  of  Dunmaglass.  Lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881. 

MACINTOSH.  Alexander  Fisher  Macintosh,  K.H.  Exchanged  as 
a  captain  to  the  79th  from  the  60th  regiment,  17th  June,  1819  ; 
went  on  half  pay,  October,  1821.  He  was  afterwards  from 
half  pay  in  the  93rd  Highlanders.  He  had  served  in  the 
Peninsula  from  1812  to  1814,  including  the  retreat  from 
Madrid  to  Salamanca,  actions  at  Alba-de-Formes  and  San 
Munos,  action  at  Hormasa  before  Burgos,  investment  of  Pam- 
peluna,  and  action  at  Tarbes. 

MACKAY.  Henry  Mackay.  Ensign,  18th  of  June,  1841  ;  lieutenant, 
llth  of  April,  1844  ;  adjutant,  19th  of  June,  1851,  Retired  on 
half  pay  in  1854, 


79'1'H    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS. 


257 


MAC  KAY.  Robert  Mackay.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800 ;  appointed 
to  a  reserve  battalion  on  the  24th  of  November,  1803.  He 
accompanied  the  79th  Highlanders  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 

MACKAY.  Robert  Mackay.  Ensign,  8th  of  June,  1807 ;  lieutenant, 
llth  of  May,  1809;  captain,  2nd  of  April,  1812;  half  pay  on 
the  9th  of  October,  1817.  Died  in  1826.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  ^South  of  France  in  1814,  and  during  the 
Waterloo  campaign,  being  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras. 

MACKENZIE.  Alexander  Mackenzie.  Ensign,  30th  of  November, 
1815  ;  half  pay  on  the  25th  of  February,  1816. 

MACKENZIE.  Colin  Charles  Mackenzie,  younger,  of  Kilcoy.  Ensign 
from  the  78th  Highlanders,  16th  of  September,  1868 ;  lieutenant, 
28th  of  October,  1871.  He  died  at  Gibraltar,  1880. 


MACKENZIE.  John  Mackenzie.  Ensign,  24th  of  December,  1812  ; 
lieutenant,  16th  of  July,  1815.  Half  pay  on  the  26th  of  March, 
1817. 

MACKENZIE.  James  Dixon  Mackenzie  (now  Sir  James  Mackenzie, 
Bart.,  of  Findon.)  Ensign,  10th  of  April,  1855;  promoted 
lieutenant  of  the  1st  West  India  regiment,  7th  of  November, 
1856. 

MACKENZIE.  Poynty  Mackenzie.  Ensign,  8th  of  April,  1825.  Retired 
in  September,  1830. 

MACKENZIE.  Dr.  R.  J.  Mackenzie.  Proceeded  to  Turkey  and  the 
Crimea  as  a  volunteer  in  1854,  and  was  attached  to  the  79th 
Highlanders,  being  present  with  the  regiment  at  the  battle  of 
Alma.  He  died  of  cholera  on  the  heights  of  the  Belbec,  on 
the  25th  of  September,  1854. 


258  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

MACKENZIE.  Thomas  Arthur  Mackenzie,  younger,  of  Ord.  Lieu- 
tenant from  the  42nd  Highlanders,  18th  of  August,  1880 ; 
captain,  16th  of  January,  1885.  He  served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  He  served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
with  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1886. 

MACKENZIE.  William  R.  Dalziel  Mackenzie.  Lieutenant  in  the  2nd 
battalion,  10th  of  April,  1886. 

MACKESSACK.  George  Ross  Mackessack.  Captain  in  the  2nd  bat- 
talion, 1st  of  July,  1881. 

MACKESY.  William  Henry  Mackesy.  Ensign,  llth  of  August,  1854; 
lieutenant,  8th  of  December,  1854 ;  captain,  6th  of  December, 
1859.  Went  to  Indian  Staff  Corps,  1st  October,  1860.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  from  July, 
1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol  and  assault 
of  the  8th  of  September.  Acted  as  assistant  engineer  to  the 
Highland  Brigade.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.) 
Also  acted  as  assistant  field  engineer  in  the  Indian  campaign  of 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal 
and  clasp.) 

MACKINTOSH.  Alford  D.  Mackintosh,  of  Mackintosh.  Captain, 
2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Was  formerly  adjutant  of 
the  71st  Highlanders. 

MACLACHLAN.  Daniel  Maclachlan,  M.D.  Assistant  surgeon,  21st 
of  February,  1828;  half  pay  on  the  8th  of  May,  1840. 

MACLAINE.  John  Maclaine.  Ensign,  25th  of  November,  1808. 
transferred  to  the  73rd  regiment  on  the  10th  of  January,  1809. 

MACLEAN.  John  Maclean.  The  first  surgeon  of  the  regiment. 
Appointed  on  the  17th  of  August,  1793.  He  retired  from  the 
regiment  in  1798, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  259 

MACLEAN.  John  Maclean.  Ensign,  9th  of  April,  1806.  He  left  the 
regiment  the  same  year. 

MACLEAN.  John  Maclean.  Ensign,  llth  of  December,  1806; 
lieutenant,  17th  of  December,  1807.  Retired  on  the  28th  of 
July,  1814. 

MACLEOD.  Hugh  Tilgham  Macleod.  Ensign,  26th  of  June,  1867 ; 
lieutenant,  1st  of  November,  1871.  Retired  on  the  14th  of 
February,  1872. 

MACLEOD.  Roderick  Willoughby  Macleod,  younger,  of  Cadboll. 
2nd  lieutenant,  25th  of  October,  1880  ;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July, 
1881.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian 
campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 
(Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  in  the  opera- 
tions of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86  with  the 
Cameron  Highlanders ;  was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its 
investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

MACNEAL.  Hector  MacNeal.  Ensign,  14th  of  September,  1838 ; 
lieutenant,  29th  of  January,  1841  ;  captain,  llth  of  November, 
1845.  Retired  on  the  2nd  of  April,  1847. 

MACNEILL.  Malcolm  MacNeill.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  llth  of 
February,  1882.  Appointed  to  the  5th  Lancers  on  the  5th  of 
December,  1883. 

MACPHERSON.  Evan  MacPherson.  Major  from  the  92nd  High- 
landers, 24th  of  June,  1813 ;  half  pay  on  the  25th  of  February, 
1816. 

:RA.  Sir  John  Macra,  K.C.B.  Ensign,  17th  of  April,  1805 ; 
lieutenant,  5th  of  September,  1805  ;  exchanged  to  the  27th 
regiment  on  the  23rd  of  December,  1812  ;  became  colonel  in 
1837  ;  and  died  at  Bruiach,  Inverness-shire,  in  1847.  He  served 
with  the  79th  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen,  expedition 
to  Sweden  under  Sir  John  Moore,  in  the  retreat  to  and  battle 
at  Corunna,  in  the  expedition  to  Walcheren,  and  at  the  siege  of 
Flushing.  He  was  also  in  the  Mahratta  wars,  1817-19, 


260  HISTORICAL    RECORDS   OF   THE 

MADDOCK.  William  Haddock.  Lieutenant  from  the  29th  regiment, 
21st  of  April,  1808;  captain,  12th  of  October,  1815.  Died 
in  1814,  while  on  half  pay.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in 
the  Waterloo  campaign  and  was  severely  wounded  at  Quatre 
Bras. 

MAINWARING.  William  Arthur  Mainwaring.  Ensign,  14th  of  June, 
1842  ;  lieutenant,  12th  of  April,  1844 ;  captain,  27th  of  October, 
1848.  Retired  in  1852. 

MAITLAND.  Adam  Maitland.  Ensign,  9th  of  June,  1846  ;  lieutenant, 
llth  of  June,  1847.  He  died  in  the  Crimea. 

MAITLAND.  Sir  Alexander  G.  Maitland,  Bart.  Ensign,  8th  of  July, 
1838.  Retired  on  the  22nd  of  February,  1840. 

MAITLAND.  Keith  Ramsay  Maitland.  Ensign,  4th  of  July,  1845  ; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  August,  1846  ;  captain,  24th  of  December, 
1852  ;  major,  16th  of  March,  1860 ;  lieutenant-colonel,  2nd  of 
March,  1872  ;  half  pay  on  the  19th  of  October,  1872.  He 
served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55  with^the  regiment, 
including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  and  siege  and  fall 
of  Sebastopol  (medal  with  three  clasps  and  Turkish  medal). 
Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow,  attack  on  the  fort  at  Rooyah,  actions 
at  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  forts 
Bunniar  and  Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad, 
capture  of  Rampore  Kussia,  and  subsequent  operations  in 
Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers,  (medal  with  clasp, 
brevet  of  major).  Served  with  the  Sikhim  field  force  in  1861 
(mentioned  in  despatches.) 

MAITLAND.     Pelham  Maitland.     Ensign,  18th    of  July,  1815;    half 
pay,  llth  of  July,  1816. 

MAITLAND.  Thomas  Maitland.  Ensign,  23rd  of  August,  1844; 
retired,  27th  of  June,  1845. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  261 

MALCOLM.  Henry  Huntly  Leith  Malcolm.  Lieutenant  from  the 
42nd  Highlanders,  29th  of  September.  1880 ;  Captain,  24th  of 
May,  1885.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir — wounded  (medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  in  1884-85  on  special 
service  as  staff-captain  (clasp.) 

MALL.  Alexander  Mall.  Appointed  captain,  3rd  of  June,  1795  ; 
retired  1797. 

MANNERS.  Robert  Manners.  Ensign,  llth  of  August,  1825; 
transferred  to  50th  regiment,  31st  of  December.  1830.  Re- 
joined 79th  in  1831  ;  captain,  [8th  of  July,  1837.  Retired  on 
the  3rd  of  April,  1840. 

MARJORIBANKS.  Coutts  Marjoribanks.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
1st  of  July,  1881.  Retired  in  1883. 

MARSHALL.  John  Marshall.  Exchanged  as  captain  from  the  91st 
regiment  on  the  6th  of  October,  1825.  Retired  on  half  pay 
on  the  15th  of  January,  1829.  He  had  served  with  the  91st 
at  the  action  of  Lugo,  the  battles  of  Vimiera  and  Corunna, 
expedition  to  Walcheren,  battles  of  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive, 
and  Orthes  (severely  wounded),  investment  of  Bayonne,  and 
siege  of  Pampeluna.  (Wounded.  Medal  with  seven  clasps.) 

[ARSHALL.  William  Marshall.  Ensign,  7th  of  November,  1799  ; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  June,  1803;  captain,  19th  of  July,  1810; 
major,  29th  of  July,  1824  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  1st  of  January, 
1838.  Retired  on  the  17th  of  September,  1839.  He  accom- 
panied the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 
He  served  throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  and  was  present  at 
the  battles  of  Corunna,  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Salamanca, 
Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.  (Wounded.  Silver  war  medal 


262  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

and  eight  clasps.)  Also  served  throughout  the  Waterloo  cam- 
paign and  was  severely  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Quarte  Bras. 
(Right  arm  amputated.  Waterloo  medal.) 

MATHIESON.  David  Mathieson.  Ensign,  28th  of  July,  1814  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 12th  of  March,  1818;  Retired  on  half  pay  on  the 
28th  of  June,  1836. 

MAULE.  Honourable  Fox  Maule.  Ensign,  3rd  of  June,  1819 ; 
lieutenant,  29th  of  July,  1824  ;  captain,  8th  of  April,  1826. 
Retired  on  the  5th  of  April,  1831. 

MAULE.  Honourable  Lauderdale  Maule.  Captain  from  the  95th 
regiment,  21st  of  August,  1835;  major,  llth  of  May,  1839; 
lieutenant-colonel,  14th  of  June,  1842.  He  commanded  the 
regiment  from  the  14th  of  June,  1842,  to  the  24th  of  December, 
1852.  He  died  in  Turkey  in  1854,  whilst  on  the  staff  of  the 
Eastern  army  as  assistant-adjutant-general. 

MAXWELL.  William  Craig  Maxwell.  Ensign,  18th  of  May,  1832  ; 
lieutenant,  13th  of  March,  1835;  captain,  2lst  of  August,  1840; 
exchanged  the  same  year  to  the  95th  regiment. 

Me  ARTHUR.  Charles  Me  Arthur.  Ensign,  9th  of  November,  1809  ; 
lieutenant,  17th  of  October,  1811  ;  appointed  to  second  veteran 
battalion,  24th  of  February,  1820.  Died  at  Inverness  on  the 
25th  of  November,  1846.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
in  the  Walcheren  expedition  as  a  Volunteer.  Served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  being  present  at  the  battles  of  Nivelle, 
Nive,  and  Toulouse  (wounded).  He  also  served  with  the  79th 
at  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo  (wounded.) 

McARTHUR.  John  Me  Arthur.  Ensign,  26th  of  May,  1814 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 30th  of  November,  1815.  Drowned  on  passage  from 
Dover  to  Calais,  17th  of  December,  1817,  whilst  proceeding  to 
join  the  army  of  occupation  in  France. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  263 

MCARTHUR.  John  McArthur.  Quarter-master,  20th  of  June,  1799; 
paymaster,  21st  of  November,  1811  ;  left  the  regiment,  16th  of 
July,  1821.  Died  at  Perth.  He  served  with  the  79th  High- 
landers at  the  battles  of  Waterloo  and  Quatre  Bras, 

McBARNET.  Alexander  Cockburn  McBarnet,  of  Torridon.  Lieu- 
tenant from  the  16th  Foot,  20th  of  October,  1846  ;  captain, 
10th  of  March,  1854;  major,  20th  of  July,  1858.  He  served 
with  the  79th  Highlanders  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign 
of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege 
and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  assault  of  the  18th  of  June  and  8th  of 
September,  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish  Medal.) 
Served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Brevet  of  Major.  Medal  with  clasp.) 
Lieutenant-colonel,  unattached,  25th  of  April,  1865. 

MCBARNET.  Donald  Hay  McBarnet.  Ensign,  21st  of  January, 
1853;  lieutenant,  llth  of  August,  1854;  captain,  7th  of 
September,  1855  ;  half  pay  on  the  10th  of  November,  1856. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  during  the  Eastern  campaign  of 
1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of  the 
18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September,  and  expedition  to 
Kertch  and  Yenikale,  wounded  on  the  24th  of  August  in  the 
trenches.  (Medal  and  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.) 

MCBARNET.  William  McBarnet.  Ensign,  24th  of  April,  1805  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 1st  of  January,  1807;  captain,  19th  of  May,  1813.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  died  on 
the  17th  of  April,  1814,  of  wounds  received  at  the  battle  of 
Toulouse. 

McBEAN.  William  McBean.  Ensign,  19th  of  July,  1815;  half 
pay  on  the  28th  of  May,  1818. 

McBEATH.  George  McBeath.  Ensign,  24th  of  July,  1800 ;  trans- 
ferred to  the  89th  regiment  in  1801, 


264  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

McCALL.  William  McCall.  Ensign,  29th  of  March,  1839;  lieu- 
tenant, 8th  of  June,  1841  ;  captain,  14th  of  November,  1841  ; 
major,  12th  of  December,  1845  ;  brevet-lieutenant-colonel,  2nd 
of  November,  1855  ;  half  pay  on  the  5th  of  August,  1857;  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  expedition  to 
Kertch  and  Yenikale,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  assaults 
of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel,  Knight  of  the 
Legion  of  Honour,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish 
Medal.) 

McCALLUM.  James  Dalgleish  Kellie  McCallum.  Ensign,  26th  of 
May,  1865;  lieutenant,  7th  of  May,  1868;  adjutant,  llth  of 
August,  1874.  Retired  in  1876.  He  served  throughout  the 
second  phase  of  the  Ashantee  war  in  1874,  attached  to  the  42nd 
Highlanders,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Amoaful,  capture 
of  Becquah,  battle  of  Ordahsu,  and  capture  of  Coomassie, 
(Medal  and  clasp.) 

MCCAUSLAND.  William  Henry  McCausland.  Ensign,  24th  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1857  ;  lieutenant,  16th  of  March,  1860  ;  captain,  29th 
of  January,  1867  ;  major,  1st  July,  1881  ;  brevet  lieutenant- 
colonel,  18th  of  November,  1882;  colonel,  18th  of  November, 
1886.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Indian  campaign  in 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  attack  on 
the  Fort  of  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  Shahjehan- 
pore,  capture  of  Forts  Bunniar  and  Mahomdie,  passage  of 
the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia,  and  subse- 
quent operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el- 
Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  brevet  of  lieutenant-colonel, 
medal  with  clasp,  4th  class  of  the  Osmanieh,  and  Khedive's 
star.) 

MCCLEVERTY.  Robert  McCleverty.  Captain,  from  the  94th  regiment, 
15th  of  December,  1840.  Died  on  the  6th  of  March,  1845. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  265 

McCRAw.  Donald  McCraw.  Ensign,  16th  of  December,  1795.  He 
left  the  regiment  in  1799. 

MCCRUMMEN.  Patrick  McCrummen.  Lieutenant  from  the  Canadian 
Fencibles,  21st  of  January,  1804  ;  captain,  30th  of  May,  1811 ; 
half  pay  in  1815.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the 
Peninsular  war,  and  was  wounded  at  Cadiz  in  1810. 

McDoNAGH.  Matthew  McDonagh.  Ensign,  5th  of  October,  1815  ; 
half  pay  on  the  25th  of  February,  1816. 

MCDONALD.  Angus  McDonald.  Ensign,  1st  of  January,  1807 ; 
lieutenant,  17th  of  March,  1808.  He  served  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  died  of  wounds  received  at 
the  siege  of  Burgos. 

MCDONALD.  Colin  McDonald.  Ensign,  20th  of  April,  1796.  He 
left  the  regiment  in  1799.  He  served  with  the  regiment 
in  Holland,  and  was  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee. 

MCDONALD.  Donald  McDonald.  Ensign,  6th  of  June,  1854 ; 
lieutenant,  1st  of  December,  1854;  captain,  17th  of  July, 
1857.  Died  in  India  in  1871.  He  served  with  the  regiment 
in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  siege  and 
fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  assault  of  the  8th  of  September. 
(Medal  and  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Served  also  in  the 
Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of 
Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

MCDONALD.  John  McDonald.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  llth  of 
July,  1885. 

MCDONNELL.  Alexander  McDonnell.  Lieutenant,  18th  of  August, 
1793.  He  left  the  regiment  in  1795. 

McDouGALL.  Duncan  McDougall.  Ensign,  16th  of  July,  1816; 
lieutenant,  3rd  of  June,  1819  ;  captain,  8th  of  July,  1834. 
Retired  on  the  28th  of  September,  1841. 


266  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

McDowALL.  Patrick  McDowall.  He  was  appointed  captain  in  the 
79th,  18th  of  August,  1793;  major,  31st  of  January,  1794; 
lieutenant-colonel,  1st  of  November,  1796.  He  accompanied 
the  regiment  to  Holland  in  1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
of  Egmont-op-Zee.  He  died  at  Rosetta  in  1801  of  wounds 
received  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria  on  the  13th  of  March. 

McDowALL.  Samuel  McDowall.  Appointed  lieutenant,  28th  of 
October,  1795 ;  captain,  3rd  of  October,  1799 ;  retired  on  the 
8th  of  June,  1809.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders 
in  Holland  in  1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont- 
op-Zee.  He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria,  and  at  the 
engagement  at  Rhamaneih.  (Wounded.  Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.).  He  was  present  with  the  regiment  at  the 
bombardment  of  Copenhagen.  He  died  in  1819  in  the  West 
Indies. 

McGiBBON.  Colin  McGibbon.  Ensign,  7th  of  August,  1811;  lieu- 
tenant, 24th  of  December,  1812.  He  died  in  1815,  whilst 
still  serving  with  the  regiment. 

McGiLL.  William  McGill.  Ensign,  5th  of  November,  1854  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 9th  of  March,  1855;  quarter-master,  14th  of  November, 
1856.  He  served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including 
the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol, 
assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September,  and 
expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps, 
5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish  medal.)  He  served  in 
the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59  with  the  regiment,  including 
the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow  (medal  and  clasp) ;  placed 
on  half  pay  on  the  16th  of  March,  1867.  Died  in  1886. 

McGiLLiVRAY.  William  McGillivray.  Assistant  surgeon,  8th  of 
December,  1804  ;  half  pay  in  1805. 

MCGREGOR.  Hugh  McGregor.  Ensign,  9th  February,  1804 ;  lieu- 
tenant, 25th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  1 7th  of  August,  1806; 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  267 

exchanged  to  the  91st  regiment  in  1812.  He  served  with  the 
79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Salamanca.  (Silver  medal  with  clasp.) 

McGwiRE.  Armoric  Russell  McGwire.  Ensign,  llth  of  May,  1855  ; 
resigned  his  commission  in  1859. 

MCINTOSH.  ^Eneas  Mclntosh.  Lieutenant-colonel  from  the  85th 
regiment,  30th  of  May,  1811.  He  died  at  Ardgowan,  5th  of 
January,  1814.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the 
Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor. 

MclNTYRE.  Alexander  Mclntyre.  Ensign,  26th  of  October,  1804  ; 
lieutenant,  25th  of  April,  1805;  captain,  12th  of  November, 
1812  ;  half  pay,  15th  of  May,  1817. 

MclNTYRE.  David  Mclntyre.  Ensign,  3rd  of  September,^  1805  ; 
exchanged  to  the  91st  regiment,  and  was  killed  at  the  battle  of 
Nivelle. 

MclNTYRE.  Duncan  Mclntyre.  Served  in  the  regiment  during  the 
year  1807. 

MclNTYRE.  Peter  Mclntyre.  Quarter-master,  22nd  of  May,  1806; 
half  pay,  14th  of  March,  1811.  Died  at  Fort  William. 

MCKENZIE.  Colin  L.  McKenzie,  of  Braelangwell  and  St.  Martin's. 
Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881  ;  captain,  26th  of 
August,  1882. 

MCKERRELL,  Augustus  de  Segur  McKerrell.  Lieutenant,  23rd  of 
August,  1884.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Served 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86  ;  was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  at 
the  reconnaissance  on  the  16th  of  December,  and  in  the 
engagement  at  Giniss. 


268  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

McKiNNON.  John  McKinnon.  Quarter-master,  25th  of  March, 
1805;  half  pay,  21st  of  May,  1806. 

MCLEAN.  Alan  McLean.  Ensign,  9th  of  December,  1812;  lieu- 
tenant, 28th  of  July,  1814  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  March,  1817.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  wounded  at 
the  battle  of  Toulouse.  Died  about  1820. 

MCLEAN.  Alexander  McLean.  Ensign,  31st  of  December,  1803  ; 
lieutenant,  23rd  of  April,  1805  ;  captain,  15th  of  October,  1812  ; 
half  pay,  1816.  Died  in  South  Uist  in  1843. 

MCLEAN.  Archibald  McLean.  Captain  from  the  Argyle  Highlanders, 
5th  of  June,  1794;  major,  1st  of  November,  1796;  lieutenant- 
colonel,  3rd  of  November,  1801.  Retired  in  1807.  He  served 
as  second  in  command  of  the  regiment  in  the  campaign  in 
Holland  in  1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op- 
Zee.  He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  Medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 

McLEAN.  Archibald  McLean.  Captain-lieutenant  and  first  adjutant 
of  the  regiment,  17th  of  August,  1793.  He  left  the  regiment 
in  1794. 

McLEAN.  Archibald  McLean.  Lieutenant,  17th  ot  August,  1793  ; 
captain-lieutenant,  8th  of  October,  1794.  He  left  the  regiment 
the  same  year. 

McLEAN.  Donald  McLean.  Ensign,  21st  of  August,  1793;  lieu- 
tenant, 1st  of  December,  1794.  He  left  the  regiment  in  1797. 

McLEAN.  Charles  James  McLean.  Ensign,  17th  of  June,  1813; 
lieutenant,  18th  of  July,  1815  ;  half  pay,  llth  of  July,  1816. 
He  was  present  with  the  regiment  at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras 
and  Waterloo. 

McLEAN.  Colin  McLean.  Ensign,  20th  of  August,  1793.  He  left 
the  regiment  in  1795. 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  269 

McLEOD.  Martin  McLeod.  Lieutenant  from  the  27th  regiment, 
18th  of  September,  1816  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  March,  1817.  He 
had  served  at  the  battles  of  Nivelle,  Nive,  Orthes,  and  Toulouse 
with  the  27th  regiment.  (Silver  medal  with  four  clasps.) 

McLEOD.  Norman  McLeod.  Ensign,  27th  of  July,  1815;  half  pay, 
8th  of  March,  1821. 

McMuNN.  Robert  Andrew  McMunn,  M.D.  Appointed  surgeon  to 
the  79th,  18th  of  September,  1840.  He  left  the  regiment  on 
the  7th  of  July,  1846.  He  served  at  the  bombardment  of 
Antwerp. 

McMuRDO.  Charles  Edward  McMurdo.  Ensign,  17th  of  Novem- 
ber, 1854 ;  lieutenant,  9th  of  March,  1855 ;  captain,  1st  of 
December,  1865.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern 
campaign  of  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol, 
and  the  assault  of  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  and  clasp 
and  Turkish  medal.)  He  served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of 
1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal 
and  clasp.)  Went  to  the  Royal  Canadian  Rifles. 

McNAiR.  John  Miller  McNair.  Ensign,  18th  of  August,  1854; 
lieutenant,  9th  of  February,  1855;  captain,  10th  of  July,  1860; 
exchanged  to  the  5th  Lancers,  but  returned  to  the  regiment  as 
paymaster.  He  served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  with  the  79th 
Highlanders  from  the  16th  of  August,  1855,  including  the  siege 
and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  the  assault  of  the  8th  of  September. 
(Medal  with  clasp  and  Turkish  medal).  He  also  served  in  the 
Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of 
Lucknow,  attack  on  the  fort  at  Rooyah,  actions  of  Allygunge, 
Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  forts  Bunniar  and 
Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of 
Rampore  Kussia,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude  across  the 
Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp).  He  accom- 
panied the  Cameron  Highlanders  to  Egypt  in  1882  as  paymaster. 
(Medal  and  Khedive's  star.) 

MCNEIL.     David  McNeil.     Ensign,  1799.     Retired  in  1800, 


270  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

McNEiL.  Donald  McNeil.  Ensign,  16th  of  December,  1795;  lieu- 
tenant, 14th  of  November,  1796  ;  captain,  10th  of  March,  1804 ; 
major,  25th  of  July,  1811.  He  joined  the  Portuguese  army  in 
1813.  He  accompanied  the  79th  to  Holland  in  1799,  and  was 
wounded  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  before 
Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Was 
present  at  the  bombardment  of  Copenhagen,  and  took  part  in 
the  expedition  to  Sweden  under  Sir  John  Moore.  He  served 
throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of 
Corunna,  Vittoria,  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  Orthes,  and 
Toulouse.  (Medal  with  seven  clasps.) 

McNEiLL.  John  McNeill.  Lieutenant,  23rd  of  April,  1805  ;  captain, 
29th  of  October,  1812.  Died  in  1825. 

McPHEE.  Donald  McPhee.  Ensign,  15th  of  December,  1808 ; 
lieutenant,  29th  of  November,  1810;  half  pay  on  the  2nd  of 
June,  1819.  He  served  in  the  regiment  at  the  bombardment 
of  Copenhagen,  with  the  expedition  to  Walcheren,  and  in  the 
Peninsular  and  Waterloo  campaigns.  He  was  present  at  the 
battles  of  Corunna,  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse, 
and  was  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras. 

McPHEE.  Alexander  McPhee.  Ensign,  30th  of  November,  1815; 
half  pay  on  the  25th  of  February,  1816. 

MCPHERSON.     Duncan  McPherson.  Ensign,  8th  of  October,  1807  ; 

lieutenant,  19th  of  July  1810.  He  served  with  the  regiment 

in  the  Peninsula,  was  wounded  at  Toulouse,  and  was  killed  at 
the  battle  of  Waterloo. 

McViCAR.  Charles  McVicar.  Lieutenant,  27th  of  March,  1794; 
left  the  regiment  in  1795. 

MENZIES.  William  G.  S.  Menzies,  of  Culdares.  Captain,  2nd  bat- 
tation,  1st  of  July,  1881, 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  271 

MERRY.  Charles  James  Merry.  Captain,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July, 
1881. 

METCALFE.  Thomas  Levet  Metcalfe.  Ensign,  5th  of  August,  1799; 
lieutenant,  23rd  of  May,  1800 ;  captain,  25th  of  April,  1805  ; 
appointed  to  the  6th  Veteran  Battalion,  22nd  of  April,  1813. 
He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 

METHUEN.  Charles  Lucas  Methuen.  Ensign,  1st  of  April,  1863  ; 
lieutenant,  30th  November,  1866.  Retired  on  the  16th  of  July, 
1873. 

MIERS.  Capel  Henry  Miers.  Captain  from  the  Canadian  Rifles,  5th 
of  May,  1869  ;  major,  1st  of  July,  1881.  Retired  on  the  15th 
of  August,  1883. 

MILLBANK.  Frederick  Millbank.  Ensign,  29th  of  December,  1837  ; 
lieutenant,  3rd  of  April,  1840.  Retired  on  the  2nd  of  August, 
1842. 

MILLER.  George  Murray  Miller,  C.B.  Ensign,  30th  of  January,  1846 ; 
lieutenant,  2nd  of  April,  1847;  captain,  4th  of  August,  1854; 
major,  2nd  of  May,  1865;  lieutenant-colonel,  4th  of  June,  1870. 
He  is  now  a  major-general.  He  commanded  the  regiment  from 
1873  to  1878.  He  served  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  and  siege  of 
Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.) 
Also  served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the 
siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Severely  wounded  through  the 
body.)  Present  also  at  the  capture  of  Rampore  Kussia  and 
subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee 
rivers.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  brevet  of  major,  medal  and 
clasp.)  Served  on  the  North  West  Frontier  of  India  against  the 
Mohmunds  in  1864.  (Medal.) 

MILLOWAY.  Charles  P.  Milloway.  Ensign,  14th  of  April,  1804;  half 
pay  in  1805, 


"2  I  2  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

MITCHELL  John  Mitchell.  Captain  from  the  19th  Light  Dragoons, 
8th  of  April,  1825  ;  major,  1st  of  June,  1826  ;  half  pay  on  the 
10th  of  January,  1837.  He  had  served  with  the  1st  Foot  in 
the  Walcheren  expedition,  and  at  the  siege  of  Flushing.  He  was 
also  in  the  Peninsula  with  the  1st  Foot,  and  was  present  at  the 
battles  of  Busaco  and  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and  at  the  action  of 
Sabugal.  (Medal  with  two  clasps.) 

MONEY.  Gordon  Lorn  Campbell  Money.  Ensign,  8th  of  February, 
1868 ;  lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871  ;  adjutant  of  the 
regiment  from  the  19th  of  December,  1879,  to  the  17th  of 
August,  1880;  captain,  18th  of  August,  1880;  major,  1st  of 
February,  1884.  He  served  in  the  Nile  expedition  in  1884-85 
with  the  Cameron  Highlanders.  (Medal  and  clasp.)  Also 
served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  of  1885-86,  as  assistant-military-secretary  to  Sir  F. 
Stephenson,  K.C.B.,  and  was  present  at  the  engagement  at 
Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  D.S.O.,  Fourth  class  of 
Osmanieh.) 

MOORSOM.  William  Scarth  Moorsom.  Ensign,  27th  of  February, 
1823  ;  exchanged  to  the  7th  Fusiliers,  1825. 

MORLEY.  George  Lyddon  Morley.  Ensign,  21st  of  September, 
1860 ;  went  to  commissariat  "department  on  the  30th  of  June, 
1865. 

MORRISON.  Charles  Morrison.  Appointed  chaplain  to  the  regiment, 
22nd  of  June,  1858.  Retired  on  the  7th  of  November,  1871. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and 
clasp.) 

MORRISON.  John  Whiteford  Morrison.  Ensign,  26th  of  August, 
1807  ;  lieutenant,  17th  of  August,  1809  ;  appointed  to  the  9th 
Veteran  battalion,  20th  of  October,  1820.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  expedition  to  Sweden  in  1808  with  Sir  John 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  273 

Moore,  in  the  expedition  to  Walcheren,  and  the  siege  of 
Flushing.  He  was  also  in  the  Peninsular  war  with  the  79th, 
and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  Corunna  and  Salamanca  and 
at  the  siege  of  Burgos.  (War  medal  with  two  clasps.) 

MOSTYN.  George  T.  B.  Mostyn.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st  oi 
July,  1881.  Retired  in  1882. 

MUNRO.  William  Munro.  Ensign,  10th  of  October,  1834;  lieutenant, 
27th  of  December,  1837  ;  captain,  14th  of  June,  1842.  Retired 
in  1854. 

MURRAY.  Alexander  Bruce  Murray.  Ensign,  18th  of  March,  1859  ; 
lieutenant,  10th  of  May,  1861 ;  captain,  5th  of  April,  1872. 
Retired  with  the  rank  of  major  on  the  29th  of  September, 
1880. 

MURRAY.  Hon.  Andrew  David  Murray.  Lieutenant,  24th  of  Decem- 
ber, 1884.  He  served  with  the  regiment  during  the  latter  part 
of  the  Nile  expedition  in  1885.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Served 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders,  was  present  at 
Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at 
Giniss. 

MURRAY.     Henry  Murray.     Ensign,  1st  of  June,  1841  ;  lieutenant, 

^23rd  of  August,  1843;  captain,  12th  of  December,  1851. 
Retired  in  1857.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Eastern 
campaign  of  1855,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol, 
and  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  clasp 
and  Turkish  medal.) 


MURRAY.  Henry  Augustus  Murray.  Ensign,  29th  of  March,  1844  ; 
lieutenant,  llth  of  November,  1845.  Retired  on  the  31st  of 
December,  1847. 


MURRAY.     Lord  James   Murray,   K.C.H.     Major  in  the  79th,  from 
the  10th  Light   Dragoons,  25th  of  March,  1805.     Retired  on 

T 


274  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

the  20th  of  February,  1806.  Colonel  and  A.D.C.  to  the  King, 
4th  of  June,  1813.  Created  Baron  Glenlyon,  17th  of  July,  1821. 
Died  in  1837. 

MURRAY.  Sir  John  Murray,  Bart.,  K.C.H.  Ensign,  24th  of  October, 
1788,  in  the  3rd  Foot  Guards ;  exchanged  as  colonel  to  the  79th, 
llth  of  December,  1806;  appointed  to  command  the  Royal 
Regiment  of  Malta,  23rd  of  February,  1808.  Became  full 
general  on  the  27th  of  May,  1825.  He  served  in  Flanders,  and 
was  present  at  the  attack  on  the  French  lines  at  Famars,  at  the 
siege  of  Valenciennes  and  Dunkirk,  battle  of  Maubeuge,  actions 
at  Cambresis  and  Tournay.  He  was  present  at  the  capture  of  the 
Cape  of  Good  Hope.  He  commanded  the  army  against 
Scindiah  and  Holkar.  Also  commanded  the  King's  German 
Legion,  under  Sir  John  Moore,  in  Portugal. 

MYLNE.  Thomas  Mylne.  Ensign,  1799  ;  lieutenant,  28th  of  March, 
1800;  captain,  24th  of  April,  1805;  Major,  18th  of  June, 
1815.  Retired  in  1821.  Died  at  Edinburgh  in  1832.  He 
accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan 
Selim  III.).  He  was  present  at  the  bombardment  of  Copen- 
hagen and  in  the  expedition  to  Walcheren.  He  served  in  the 
Peninsula  and  was  wounded  at  Toulouse ;  was  also  present  at 
the  battle  of  Quatre  Bras,  where  he  was  again  severely  wounded. 

NAPIER.     Sir   Robert    Napier,   Bart.,   of  Milliken.     Ensign,   7th  of 
August,  1835;  lieutenant,  14th  of  September,  1838;   captain 
12th  of  April,  1844.     Retired  on  the  9th  of  June,  1846. 

NAPIER.  Robert  F.  L.  Napier,  son  of  Sir  Robert  Napier.  Lieutenant, 
29th  of  November,  1876  ;  captain,  14th  of  July,  1883.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of 
1884-85.  (Medal  and  clasp.)  Also  served  throughout  the 
operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86 ;  was 
present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement 
at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie.) 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  275 

NASH.     John  Nash.     Ensign,  18th  of  November,  1813 ;  lieutenant, 
19th  of  July,  1815  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  March,  1817.     He  served- 
with  the  79th  at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and   Waterloo. 
(Wounded.) 

NETTLESHIP.  Arthur  John  Nettleship.  Appointed  paymaster,  9th  of 
March,  1885.  He  served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86.  (Medal.) 

NEWHOUSE.  Charles  B.  Newhouse.  Ensign,  6th  of  April,  1825  ; 
lieutenant,  1st  of  August,  1826.  Retired  on  the  25th  of  June, 
1829. 

NEWPORT.  Simon  George  Newport.  Captain  from  the  39th  regiment, 
6th  of  June,  1857.  Died  in  India. 

O'CONNOR.  Ogle  Nisbett  O'Connor.  Ensign,  15th  of  October,  1812  ; 
lieutenant,  1st  of  August,  1826  ;  retired,  25th  of  June,  1829. 

OLDHAM.  Henry  Hugh  Oldham.  Captain  from  the  48th  regiment, 
31st  of  October,  1871 ;  major,  1st  of  July,  1881 ;  lieutenant- 
colonel,  half  pay,  1st  of  July,  1886.  He  served  with  the  China 
expeditionary  force  of  1860,  and  was  present  at  the  actions  of 
Sinhoo  and  Tangku,  assault  and  capture  of  the  North  Taku  fort, 
and  surrender  of  Pekin.  (Medal  with  two  clasps.)  Served  in 
the  Cossyah  and  Jynteah  campaign  in  1863.  (Mentioned 
in  despatches.) 

0 


ORDE.     Robert  Francis  Orde.     Ensign,  23rd  of  August,  1833  ;   he 
left  the  regiment  in  1835. 


ORR.     Alexander  Orr.    Ensign,  1806  ;  lieutenant,  16th  of  December, 

k!807  ;  drowned,  1809,  at  the  Isle  of  Wight. 


PALMER.  Thomas  Palmer.  Lieutenant,  30th  of  May,  1800;  retired 
1802.  He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 


276  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

PATERSON.  Robert  Arthur  Paterson.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
1st  of  July,  1881. 

PEACOCK.  Samuel  Peacock,  M.D.  Appointed  surgeon,  79th  High- 
landers, 24th  of  May,  1821  ;  retired  1824. 

PERCIVAL.  Philip  Percival.  Ensign,  16th  of  August,  1850  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 6th  of  June,  1854;  captain,  27th  of  March,  1855; 
major,  1st  of  April,  1870 ;  lieutenant-colonel,  1st  of  October, 
1877;  colonel,  19th  of  October,  1878.  He  served  with  the 
79th  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles 
of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebastopol,  assault  of  the  18th 
of  June,  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with 
three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  He  served  with  the  regiment 
in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and 
capture  of  Lucknow,  attack  on  the  fort  of  Rooyah,  actions  of 
Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  forts  Bunniar 
and  Mahomdie,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  capture  of 
Rampore  Kussia,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across 
the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 

PERSTON.  David  Perston,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant  surgeon,  18th 
of  October,  1810;  surgeon,  17th  of  February,  1825;  went  to 
the  4th  Light  Dragoons.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the 
Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  action  of  Foz  d'Aronce,  at  the 
siege  of  Burgos,  and  at  the  battle  of  Salamanca.  (Silver  war 
medal  with  clasp.)  He  was  also  present  with  the  regiment  at 
the  battles  of  Quatre-Bras  and  Waterloo. 

PETERS.  William  Bird  Peters.  Ensign,  21st  of  April,  1796  ;  retired 
1797. 

PETRIE.  Alexander  Petrie.  Lieutenant,  5th  of  September,  1795  ; 
captain,  26th  of  October,  1796  ;  major,  28th  of  May,  1807  ; 
lieutenant-colonel,  llth  of  May,  1811 ;  retired  in  1812  ;  died  in 
1844  at  Bath.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  Holland  in  1799,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egtnont-op  Zee.  He  accompanied 
the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  277 

before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  He 
served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  in  the 
retreat  to  Corunna,  and  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor.  (Gold 
medal.) 

POTTS-CHATTO.  Denis  Potts-Chatto.  2nd  lieutenant  in  the  2nd 
battalion,  29th  of  January,  1887. 

FOWLING.  John  Fowling.  Ensign,  29th  of  May,  1811  ;  lieutenant, 
15th  of  October,  1812;  died,  December,  1815,  of  wounds 
received  at  the  battle  of  Waterloo. 

PURVES.  Patrick  Purves.  Lieutenant,  23rd  of  July,  1807  ;  captain, 
28th  of  October,  1810.  He  was  killed  at  the  battle  of 
Toulouse,  10th  of  April,  1814. 

PROBYN.  John  Langford  Probyn.  2nd  lieutenant,  5th  of  October, 
1878  ;  resigned  his  commission,  25th  of  February,  1880. 

QUIN.  George  Quin.  Ensign,  llth  of  December,  1858;  lieutenant 
from  the  Rifle  Brigade,  26th  of  April,  1859  ;  retired  in  1872. 

RADCLIFFE.  Joseph  H.  Francis  Radcliffe.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
Uth  of  February,  1885. 

RAWDON.  John  Dawson  Rawdon.  Ensign,  12th  of  December,  1822. 
Transferred  to  Coldstream  Guards  1823. 

REEVE.  Thomas  John  Reeve.  Ensign,  llth  of  May,  1839;  lieu- 
tenant, 28th  of  December,  1841  ;  captain,  9th  of  June,  1846  ; 
retired  in  1851. 

REID.  George  Alexander  Caradoc  Reid,  of  Shandwick.  Lieutenant, 
20th  of  November,  1875  ;  captain,  19th  of  September,  1881  ; 
retired  in  1883.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 

RIACH.  Malcolm  Stewart  Riach.  Lieutenant  from  the  69th  regi- 
ment, 23rd  of  January,  1883.  He  served  with  the  Cameron 


278  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

Highlanders  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Also  served  throughout  the  operations 
of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force,  1885-86,  and  was  present 
at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  at  the  reconnaissance  on  the 
1 6th  of  December,  and  was  staff  officer  at  Kosheh  during  the 
engagement  at  Giniss. 

RIACH.  William  Alexander  Riach.  Ensign,  27th  of  October,  1811  ; 
lieutenant,  17th  of  June,  1813  ;  captain,  7th  of  April,  1825  ; 
major,  28th  of  June,  1838;  retired,  15th  of  June,  1842  ;  died 
at  Perth  in  1843.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula, 
and  was  present  with  the  army  covering  the  siege  of  Badajos, 
at  the  battle  of  Salamanca,  occupation  of  Madrid,  siege  of 
Burgos,  campaigns  of  1811-12-13.  (Silver  war  medal  and 
clasp.)  He  also  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Waterloo 
campaign,  and  was  severely  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras. 
He  was  present  with  the  army  of  occupation  in  France  in 
1815-16-17.  (Waterloo  medal.) 

RIDDELL.  Henry  James  K.  H.  Riddell.  Major  from  the  50th 
regiment,  21st  of  April,  1808.  Exchanged  to  quarter-master- 
general's  staff,  4th  of  February,  1810.  He  was  present  at  the 
bombardment  of  Copenhagen  in  1807. 

RIDSDALE.  George  Ridsdale.  Appointed  surgeon,  9th  of  September, 
1813;  half  pay,  1817.  He  was  present  with  the  regiment  at 
the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo. 

ROBERTSON.  Alexander  Robertson.  Ensign,  15th  of  July,  1809; 
lieutenant,  4th  of  July,  1811 ;  half  pay,  1816.  Died  at  Wick, 
23rd  of  March,  1844.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the 
Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  the  Nive. 

ROBERTSON.  Fulton  Robertson.  Ensign,  5th  of  January,  1809  ; 
lieutenant,  21st  of  February,  1811  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  January, 
1817.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was 
present  at  the  battles  of  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  (severely 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  279 

wounded)  Pyrenees,  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.     (Silver  war 
medal  and  six  clasps).     He  was  also  present  at  the  battles  of- 
Waterloo  and  Quatre  Bras.     (Medal.) 

ROBERTSON.  James  Robertson.  Ensign,  6th  of  January,  1814  ; 
lieutenant,  20th  of  July,  1815  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  February, 
1816.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was 
present  at  the  battles  of  Corunna,  Busaco,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  and 
Salamanca.  (Medal  with  four  clasps.)  He  also  served  in  the 
Waterloo  campaign,  and  was  severely  wounded  at  Quatre  Bras. 

ROBERTSON.  James  Robertson.  Ensign,  29th  of  February,  1841  ; 
lieutenant,  14th  of  April,  1843  ;  retired,  July,  1849. 

ROBERTSON.  Rev.  James  Robertson.  He  served  as  chaplain  to  the 
regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment, 
at  the  reconnaissance  of  the  16th  of  December,  and  at  the 
engagement  at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches.  Medal.) 

ROBERTSON.  Thomas  Gilzcan  Robertson.  Ensign,  27th  of  June, 
1845;  retired  1846. 

ROBERTSON.  William  Buxton  Robertson.  Ensign,  16th  of  March, 
1855  ;  lieutenant,  16th  of  June,  1857  ;  went  to  the  25th  King's 
Own  Borderers  in  1860. 

ROBINSON.  Samuel  Robinson.  Ensign,  16th  of  March,  1808; 
lieutenant,  29th  of  June,  1809  ;  retired,  25th  of  June,  1812. 

ROMILLY.  Frederick  Romilly.  Captain  from  the  90th  regiment, 
24th  of  August,  1834  ;  exchanged  to  the  Scot  Fusilier  Guards, 
25th  of  September,  1835. 

ROOKE.  Charles  Rooke.  Captain  from  the  3rd  Foot  Guards,  25th  of 
September,  1835  ;  retired,  3rd  of  June,  1838. 

ROSE.  William  Rose.  Captain,  17th  of  November,  1796  ;  major, 
26th  of  January,  1797;  retired  in  1799. 


280 


HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 


Ross.  Allan  Theophilus  Ross.  Captain  from  half  pay,  29th  regiment, 
29th  of  January,  1882  ;  placed  on  half  pay,  5th  of  January, 
1884. 

Ross.  Patrick  Ross.  Lieutenant,  20th  of  June,  1798  ;  exchanged 
to  69th  regiment  in  1803.  Killed  at  the  storming  of  Java,  1811. 
He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  Egypt,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Severely  wounded,  right  arm 
amputated.  Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 

ROWLEY.  Henry  Frederick  Rowley.  Ensign,  9th  of  April,  1861  ; 
went  to  the  78th  Highlanders,  26th  of  May,  1865. 

RUSE.  John  Ruse.  Lieutenant  from  Cape  regiment,  28th  of  April, 
1808;  he  died  in  1809. 

SCOBELL.  William  Leaper  Scobell.  Ensign,  7th  of  December,  1826  ; 
lieutenant,  18th  of  May,  1832  ;  retired,  25th  of  October,  1833. 

SCOT.  Thomas  Goldie  Scot,  M.D.  Appointed  assistant-surgeon, 
23rd  of  September,  1845;  surgeon,  18th  of  February,  1853; 
surgeon-major,  14th  of  December,  1861  ;  retired  on  half  pay 
as  deputy-inspector-general,  7th  of  June,  1867.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 
battle  of  Alma  and  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal 
with  two  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  and  Turkish  medal.) 
Served  also  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the 
siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

SCOTT.  Alexander  James  Corse  Scott.  Ensign,  26th  of  January, 
1866.  Transferred  to  Bengal  Staff  Corps,  14th  of  December, 
1869. 

SCOTT.     John  Scott.     Ensign,  27th  of  October,  1848. 

SCOTT.  William  Scott  (afterwards  Sir  William  Scott,  Bart.,  of 
Ancrum).  Captain  from  34th  regiment,  21st  of  July,  1848  ; 
retired  in  1854. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  281 

SCOTT.  William  Angel  Scott.  2nd  lieutenant  from  31st  regiment, 
6th  of  December,  1879;  lieutenant,  21st  of  July,  1880~; 
resigned  his  commission,  13th  of  November,  1884.  He  served 
with  the  regiment  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882.  (Medal 
and  Khedive's  star.)  He  served  in  the  Soudan  expedition  of 
1884  as  A.D.C.  to  Major-General  Sir  Gerald  Graham,  V.C., 
K.C.B.,  and  was  present  at  the  actions  of  El-Teb  and  Tamaii. 
(Mentioned  in  despatches,  two  clasps.) 

SCOTT-ELLIOT.  Adam  Scott-Elliot.  2nd  lieutenant,  23rd  of  October, 
1880  ;  lieutenant,  1st  of  July,  1881.  He  served  throughout  the 
Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el- 
Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in 
1885-86,  in  command  of  the  Cameron  division  of  the  camel 
corps,  and  was  present  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

SCOVELL.  George  Thomas  Scovell.  Ensign,  6th  of  June,  1854 ; 
lieutenant,  8th  of  October,  1854  ;  captain,  16th  of  June,  1857  ; 
retired  in  1868.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow. 
(Medal  with  clasp.) 

SEDLEY.  Frederick  Sedley.  Captain  from  5th  Lancers,  9th  of  May, 
1871  ;  exchanged  to  48th  foot,  1st  of  November,  1871.  He 
served  in  the  China  war  of  1860.  (Medal  and  two  clasps.) 

SEWELL.  William  Henry  Sewell,  C.B.  Major-general,  9th  of 
November,  1846;  colonel  of  79th,  21st  of  March,  1854.  He 
served  on  the  staff  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  present  at  the  battles 
of  Corunna,  Talavera,  and  Busaco  ;  sieges  of  Ciudad  Rodrigo, 
Badajos,  and  San  Sebastien ;  battles  of  Nivelle,  Nive,  and  the 
sorties  from  Bayonne  ;  battles  of  Orthes  and  Toulouse.  (Had 
six  horses  killed  under  him  in  various  actions.  Medal  with  ten 
clasps.) 

SHAW.  James  Thomas  Shaw.  Captain,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July 
1881.  Retired  in  1887. 


282  HISTORICAL   RECORDS    OF   THE 

SHORT.  John  Short,  M.D.  Appointed  surgeon  to  the  79th,  25th  of 
March,  1824  ;  transferred  to  24th  regiment,  23rd  of  April,  1835. 
He  had  served  previously  in  the  Peninsular  and  American 
wars. 

SIMPSON.  William  Simpson.  Quarter-master,  16th  of  March,  1867. 
Retired  on  the  19th  of  April,  1878.  He  served  in  the  Eastern 
campaign  with  the  regiment  in  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of 
Alma  and  Balaclava,  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale,  siege 
and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  the 
8th  of  September.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish 
medal.)  Also  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including 
the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

SINCLAIR.  Archibald  Sinclair.  Quarter-master,  25th  of  February, 
1813  ;  lieutenant  in  3rd  veteran  battalion,  31st  of  August,  1815. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula. 

SINCLAIR.  Hon.  James  Sinclair.  Captain  from  the  95th  regiment, 
8th  of  April,  1825;  exchanged  to  92nd  Highlanders,  2nd  of 
February,  1826. 

SINCLAIR.  John  Sinclair.  Ensign,  1 9th  of  November,  1803;  lieu- 
tenant, 14th  of  March,  1805;  captain,  4th  of  July,  1811.  He 
served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was 
slightly  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Fuentes  d'Onor.  He  died  on 
the  17th  of  June,  1815,  of  wounds  received  at  Quatre  Bras. 

SKENE.  Charles  Skene.  Ensign,  12th  of  April,  1833;  lieutenant, 
6th  of  November,  1835;  captain,  29th  of  January,  1841. 
Retired  on  the  4th  of  July,  1845. 

SMITH.  Astley  Campbell  Smith.  Captain  from  25th  regiment,  29th 
of  January,  1841.  Retired  on  the  4th  of  July,  1845. 

SMITH.  George  Smith.  Ensign,  23rd  of  March,  1855  ;  lieutenant 
from  the  72nd  regiment,  2nd  of  November,  1855.  Retired  in 
1859. 


79TH  CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  283 

SMITH.  Haskett  Smith.  Ensign,  29th  of  May,  1835  ;  lieutenant, 
8th  of  June,  1838  ;  captain,  14th  of  April,  1843.  Retired  orr 
the  llth  of  November,  1845. 

SMITH.  William  Haskett  Smith.  Ensign,  9th  of  February,  1870; 
lieutenant,  28th  of  October,  1871 ;  captain,  29th  of  September, 
1880;  major,  9th  of  February,  1885.  He  served  throughout 
the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Also  served  in  the  operations  of  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  with  the  regiment  in  1885-86,  and 
was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  at  the  reconnais- 
sance of  the  16th  of  December,  and  at  the  engagement  at 
Giniss. 

SMYTH.  John  Stewart  Smyth.  Ensign,  10th  of  September,  1825  ; 
lieutenant,  5th  of  April,  1831  ;  captain,  29th  of  December, 
1837.  Retired  on  the  14th  of  April,  1843. 

SMYTHE.  David  Murray  Smythe,  younger,  of  Methven.  Sub- 
lieutenant, 8th  of  May,  1872;  lieutenant,  8th  of  May,  1874. 
Retired  in  1878. 

SODEN.  Ambrose  Soden.  Appointed  lieutenant,  31st  of  May,  1795  ; 
captain,  llth  of  January,  1797;  superseded,  17th  of  Septem- 
ber, 1803.  He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal 
from  Sultan  Selim  III.). 

SODEN.  John  Smith  Soden.  Assistant-surgeon,  26th  of  June,  1800; 
resigned,  16th  of  April,  1803.  He  accompanied  the  79th 
Highlanders  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from  Sultan  Selim  III.).  Also 
served  in  the  expedition  to  Ferrol. 

STEELE.  Thomas  Steele.  Appointed  captain,  3rd  of  September, 
1795  ;  retired  in  1797. 

STEPNEY.  Herbert  Herbert  Stepney.  Ensign,  29th  of  July,  1862 ; 
lieutenant,  5th  of  August,  1864;  resigned  his  commission  in 

1868. 


284 


HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 


STEVENSON.  Henry  Halford  Stevenson.  Ensign,  29th  of  June,  1849  ; 
lieutenant,  24th  of  December,  1852;  captain,  29th  of  December, 
1854;  brevet  major,  20th  of  July,  1858;  half  pay,  23rd  of 
October,  1860.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma 
and  Balaclava,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of  the  18th 
of  June  and  8th  of  September,  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie, 
Sardinian  and  Turkish  medals.)  Served  in  the  Indian  campaign 
of  1^58-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow; 
served  as  brigade-major  from  February,  1858,  to  the  close  of 
the  campaign.  (Frequently  mentioned  in  despatches,  brevet  of 
major,  medal  and  clasp.) 

STEWART.  Charles  Duncan  Stewart,  of  Brin.  Lieutenant,  2nd 
battalion,  8th  of  March,  1884. 

STEWART.  Francis  Stewart,  of  Lesmurdie.  Appointed  major,  9th 
of  August,  1799  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  1st  of  January,  1800;  half 
pay,  17th  of  February,  1800. 

STEWART.  P.  Duncan  Stewart.  Lieutenant,  17th  of  August,  1793  ; 
captain,  1st  of  December,  1794.  Retired  in  1799. 

STEWART.  Robert  Stewart.  Ensign,  13th  of  July,  1855  ;  lieutenant, 
17th  of  June,  1859  ;  adjutant,  18th  of  February,  1859  ;  retired 
in  1863.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Indian  campaign 
of  1858-59,  including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow. 
(Medal  and  clasp.) 

ST.  LEGER.  Henry  Hungerford  St.  Leger,  D.S.O.  Major  from  the 
71st  Highlanders,  February,  1881  ;  lieutenant-colonel,  1st  of 
July,  1881  ;  colonel,  1st  of  July,  1885.  Retired  on  the  1st  of 
July,  1887.  He  served  with  the  80th  regiment  in  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858-59,  and  was  present  at  the  action  of 
Gowlowlie  and  the  capture  of  Calpee.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 
He  served  throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  with  the 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  285 

Cameron  Highlanders,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el- 
Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served: 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Com- 
manded the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  operations  of 
the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  commandant 
at  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  was  present  at  the 
engagement  at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  D.S.O.). 

STOURTON.  Edward  G.  Stourton.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  16th 
of  April,  1884. 

STREET.  Henry  Jardine  Street.  Ensign,  14th  of  November,  1845  ; 
lieutenant,  3rd  of  November,  1846  ;  exchanged  to  34th  regiment, 
21st  of  July,  1848. 

STRONACH.  Alexander  Stronach.  Ensign,  19th  of  April,  1796  ; 
Retired  in  1799. 

STUART.  Eustace  Robertson  Burnett  Stuart,  of  Crichie.  Lieutenant 
from  the  7th  Fusiliers,  27th  of  August,  1873.  Retired  on  the 
14th  of  April,  1875. 

STUART.  John  Stuart.  Appointed  lieutenant,  19th  of  November, 
1795;  went  to  95th  Rifles,  27th  of  August,  1800;  and  served 
with  them  in  Egypt  and  in  the  Peninsula. 

SULLIVAN.  William  Sullivan.  Major  from  the  8th  Garrison  Battalion, 
23rd  of  April,  1807.  Retired  on  the  4th  of  October,  1810. 

SUTHERLAND.  George  Sutherland.  Ensign,  3rd  of  November,  1797; 
lieutenant,  27th  of  September,  1798;  transferred  to  the  71st 
Highlanders,  8th  of  December,  1804,  and  died  in  Walcheren  in 
1809.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in  Holland  in 
1799,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee.  He 
accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Wounded.  Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 

SUTHERLAND.  Robert  Sutherland.  Lieutenant  from  the  Staff  Corps 
Cavalry,  20th  of  April,  1815;  half  pay,  25th  of  February,  1816. 


286  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

TAYLOR.  Sir  Richard  C.  H.  Taylor,  K.C.B.  Ensign,  llth  of 
December,  1835;  lieutenant,  29th  of  March,  1839;  captain, 
23rd  of  August,  1844;  major,  8th  of  August,  1854;  lieutenant- 
colonel,  12th  of  December,  1854;  colonel,  21st  of  May,  1858; 
major-general,  6th  of  March,  1868  ;  lieutenant-general,  1st  of 
October,  1877  ;  general,  1st  of  April,  1883.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 
battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  and  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol. 
(Medal  with  three  clasps,  5th  class  of  the  Medjidie,  Sardinian 
and  Turkish  medals.)  He  commanded  the  79th  Highlanders 
from  February  to  November,  1858,  in  the  Indian  campaign, 
including  the  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  and  commanded 
a  brigade  in  Oude  from  November,  1858,  to  January,  1859. 
(Mentioned  in  despatches,  C.B.,  brevet  of  colonel,  medal  and 
clasp.) 

THARPE.  John  Tharpe.  Ensign,  20th  of  May,  1814;  lieutenant, 
15th  of  October,  1815  ;  half  pay,  25th  of  January,  1816. 

THOMSON.  Thomas  Thomson.  Appointed  chaplain,  17th  of  August, 
1793.  Retired  in  1797. 

THOMSON.  William  Seaman  Thomson.  Ensign,  31st  of  May,  1859; 
appointed  to  Scots  Greys,  12th  of  June,  1860. 

THOMPSON.  Frederick  Hacket  Thompson.  2nd  lieutenant,  6th  of 
August,  1879;  lieutenant,  22nd  of  May,  1880;  captain,  20th  of 
February,  1884.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  war  of  1882  as  transport  officer,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Served  also  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier 
Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its 
investment  (wounded),  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

THOMPSON.  John  Thompson.  Ensign,  31st  of  October,  1811  ; 
lieutenant,  18th  of  November,  1813  ;  half  pay,  27th  of  January, 
1820.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was 
slightly  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Nivelle  ;  also  at  the  battles  of 
Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo, 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  287 

TOWNSHEND.  Lee  Porcher  Townshend.  Ensign  from  the  54th 
regiment,  23rd  of  May,  1822  ;  lieutenant,  7th  of  April,  1825-; 
captain,  unattached,  in  1826. 

TRAVERS.  Sir  R.  Travers,  C.B.,  K.C.M.G.  Captain  from  the  112th 
regiment,  3rd  of  July,  1799  ;  appointed  to  the  95th  Rifles,  25th 
of  August,  1800.  He  served  with  the  79th  Highlanders  in 
Holland,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Egmont-op-Zee,  also 
in  the  expedition  to  Ferrol.  (Wounded  in  the  head.)  He 
afterwards  served  with  great  distinction,  and  received  gold 
medals  for  Maida,  Roleia,  and  Vimiera.  He  became  a  major- 
general  on  the  27th  of  May,  1825,  and  died  in  1834  at  Cork. 

TURNER.  Augustus  Henry  Turner.  Ensign,  24th  of  May,  1861  ; 
lieutenant,  4th  of  July,  1865  ;  transferred  to  the  Bengal  Staff 
Corps,  7th  of  May,  1868. 

TURNER.  Francis  Charles  Turner.  Ensign,  9th  of  July,  1852  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 6th  of  June,  1854 ;  captain,  15th  of  June,  1855 ; 
exchanged  to  the  39th  regiment  in  1859.  He  served  with  the 
79th  Highlanders  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including 
the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol, 
and  the  assault  of  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with  three 
clasps  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment  in 
the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  and  was  present  at  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 

URQUHART.  Beauchamp  Colclough  Urquhart,  younger,  of  Meldrum. 
2nd  lieutenant,  14th  of  January,  1880;  lieutenant,  12th  of 
February,  1881  ;  captain,  2nd  of  November,  1885.  He  served 
with  the  regiment  in  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  from  the  landing 
at  Ismailia,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 
(Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  throughout 
the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the 
regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier 
Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  invest- 
ment and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 


288  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

URQUHART.  John  Urquhart.  Appointed  lieutenant,  20th  of  Augus  , 
1793  ;  captain-lieutenant  and  captain,  2nd  of  September,  1795. 
Retired  in  1797. 

WALBEOFFE.  Thomas  Wilkins  Walbeoffe.  Ensign,  29th  of  March, 
1810;  lieutenant,  13th  of  October,  1812;  half  pay,  25th  of 
December,  1815. 

WALKER.  Arthur  Walker.  Ensign,  9th  of  March,  1855  ;  lieutenant, 
16th  of  June,  1857  ;  captain,  20th  of  February,  1866  ;  half  pay, 
llth  of  January,  1867.  He  served  throughout  the  Indian 
campaign  of  1858-59  as  aide-de-camp  to  Brigadier-General 
Douglas,  including  the  operations  across  the  Goomtee ;  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow,  and  subsequent  operations  on  the 
march  to  the  relief  of  Azimghur.  (Mentioned  in  despatches. 
Medal  with  clasp.) 

WAUGH.  Gilbert  Waugh.  Captain,  17th  of  August,  1793.  Retired 
in  1795. 

WEBB.  John  Wynne  Webb.  Ensign,  15th  of  March,  1808  ;  lieu- 
tenant, 20th  of  July,  1810;  captain,  23rd  of  September,  1813; 
transferred  to  the  3rd  Veteran  Battalion  in  1815.  Died  in 
1845.  He  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  expedition  to 
Sweden  under  Sir  John  Moore ;  also  in  the  Walcheren  expedi- 
tion, at  the  siege  of  Flushing,  defence  of  Cadiz,  and  action 
at  Sancti  Pietri.  He  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula, 
and  was  present  at  the  passage  of  the  Coa ;  actions  of  Zobral, 
Sabugal,  Foz  d'Aronce  ;  battles  of  Corunna,  Busaco,  Fuentes 
d'Onor  (severely  wounded),  Salamanca  (three  times  wounded) ; 
and  at  the  siege  of  Badajos.  At  these  two  latter  he  was  doing 
duty  with  the  Portuguese  troops.  (Silver  war  medal  and  five 
clasps.) 

WEBSTER.  James  Webster.  Ensign,  2nd  of  April,  1847;  lieutenant, 
12th  of  October,  1849.  Retired  in  1854. 

WELD.  Edmund  Weld.  Assistant-surgeon  from  the  Elgin  Fencibles, 
16th  of  April,  1803.  Went  to  the  67th  regiment,  19th  of  July, 
1806 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  289 

WIGHT.  James  Wight.  Ensign,  12th  of  October,  1815 ;  half  pay, 
25th  of  February,  1816. 

WILLIAMSON.  James  Williamson.  Lieutenant  from  the  42nd  High- 
landers, 25th  of  March,  1805  ;  captain,  8th  of  June,  1809  ; 
exchanged  to  the  94th  regiment,  and  was  killed  at  Ciudad 
Rodrigo  in  1812. 

WIMBERLEY.  Douglas  Wimberley.  Ensign,  24th  of  May,  1855 ; 
lieutenant,  30th  of  June,  1857  ;  adjutant,  18th  of  June,  1858. 
Retired  on  the  12th  of  May,  1863.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 

WoLRiGE-GoRDON.  Henry  Gordon  Wolrige-Gordon  (Esslemont.) 
Lieutenant,  6th  of  May,  1885.  He  served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86.  Was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment, 
and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  (Medal.) 

WOLRIGE-GORDON.  Walter  Gordon  Wolrige-Gordon  (Esslemont.) 
Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion,  1st  of  July,  1881 ;  appointed  to  the 
Black  Watch,  3rd  of  October,  1883,  and  served  with  it  in 
Egypt  and  the  Soudan. 

WOOD.  Albert  Charles  Wood.  Ensign,  19th  of  March,  1859;  lieu- 
tenant, 2nd  of  July,  1861  ;  went  to  the  8th  Hussars  in  1864. 

WOOD.  David  Wood,  M.D.  Assistant-surgeon,  3rd  of  June,  1805; 
transferred  to  the  57th  regiment,  3rd  of  November,  1808. 

WOOD.  William  Thomas  Wood.  Ensign,  15th  of  June,  1842;  lieu- 
tenant, 23rd  of  August,  1844  ;  exchanged  to  the  20th  regiment 
in  1845. 

WYVILL.  Richard  Augustus  Wyvill.  Captain,  1st  of  October,  1795 ; 
major  in  the  7th  West  India  Regiment,  3rd  of  March,  1804. 
He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  (Gold  medal  from 
Sultan  Selim  III.). 


•290  HISTORICAL    RECORDS,    ETC. 

WYATT.  James  Henry  Wyatt.  Ensign,  20th  of  September,  1844  ; 
lieutenant,  26th  of  June,  1846  ;  captain,  3rd  of  August,  1855; 
half  pay  in  1855. 

YOUNG.  George  Frederick  Young.  Ensign,  30th  of  June,  1865; 
transferred  to  the  Bengal  Staff  Corps,  19th  of  February,  1870. 

YOUNG.  James  Young.  Ensign,  from  sergeant-major,  and  adjutant, 
2nd  of  October,  1854 ;  lieutenant,  9th  of  February,  1855 ; 
captain,  llth  of  May,  1860.  Retired  in  1860.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  in  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 
battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale,  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol,  and  assaults  of  the 
18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September.  (Medal  with  three 
clasps,  Knight  of  the  Legion  of  Honour,  and  Turkish  medal.) 
Also  served  in  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858,  including  the 
siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 

YOUNG,  John  Crawford  Young.  Captain  from  the  91st  regiment, 
9th  of  October,  1817;  major,  6th  of  September,  1833;  half 
pay,  10th  of  May,  1839.  He  had  previously  served  with  the 
91st  regiment  throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  being  present  at 
the  battles  of  Roleia,  Vimiera,  Corunna,  Nivelle,  Nive,  Orthes, 
and  Toulouse.  (Medal  with  seven  clasps.) 

YOUNGER.  John  Henderson  Younger.  Lieutenant,  2nd  battalion, 
2nd  of  May,  1885. 


0f  t\it  Warrant  ©firm. 


CAMPBELL.  Joseph  Campbell.  Joined  on  the  31st  of  July,  1857, 
and  became  sergeant-major  18th  of  April,  1878.  Served  with 
the  regiment  during  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858. 
(Medal.)  Was  sergeant-major  of  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  silver  medal  for 
distinguished  conduct  in  the  field,  medal  and  clasp,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  Is  now  adjutant  of  the  Perth  (Western  Aus- 
tralia) Volunteers.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal  for 
long  service  and  good  conduct. 

"RASER.  Alexander  Donald  Fraser.  Appointed  colour-sergeant  in 
the  Highland  Light  Infantry  Militia  from  the  Scots  Guards  on 
the  7th  of  December,  1880,  and  became  sergeant-major  of  the 
2nd  battalion  Cameron  Highlanders,  1st  of  April,  1885. 

MACDONALD.  James  Ronald  Macdonald.  Became  bandmaster  on 
the  13th  of  September,  1872.  Served  with  the  regiment  in 
Egypt  from  1883  to  1885.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal 
for  long  service  and  good  conduct.  Is  now  inspecting  band- 
master of  the  Egyptian  Army. 

MCLEAN.  Hugh  McLean.  Became  warrant  officer  on  the  1st  of 
July,  1881,  and  is  now  sergeant-major  at  the  depot  at  Inverness. 
Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal  for  long  service  and  good 
conduct. 


292  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

WAKELEN.  Richard  B.  B.  Wakelen.  Joined  on  the  21st  of  March, 
1873,  and  became  bandmaster  1st  of  November,  1885.  Served 
with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with 
clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  with  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1886. 

YOUNG.  William  Young.  Joined  on  the  28th  of  November,  1867, 
and  became  sergeant-major  13th  of  April,  1887.  Served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  des- 
patches, silver  medal  for  distinguished  conduct  in  the  field, 
medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  with  the 
regiment  throughout  the  Nile  Expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field 
Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment, 
and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver 
medal  for  long  service  and  good  conduct. 


The  following  are  a  few  of  those  whose  honourable 
and  distinguished  services  in  the  ranks  of  the  79th 
Cameron  Highlanders  have  contributed  so  much  to 
the  credit  of  the  Regiment,  and  the  Committee  regret 
that  they  are  unable  to  extend  the  roll  further. 


BRAND.  George  Brand.  Joined  on  the  5th  of  November,  1877, 
and  became  colour-sergeant  1st  of  January,  1884.  Served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp, 
and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment  throughout 
the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 

BROWN.  David  Brown.  Transferred  from  the  Foot  Guards  as  drum- 
major  on  the  1st  of  February,  1851.  Served  with  the  regiment 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  293 

throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the 
battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of 
the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September,  and  the  expedition 
to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish 
medal.)  Also  served  throughout  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign 
of  1858-59,  including  the  engagement  at  Secundragunge,  siege 
and  capture  of  Lucknow,  actions  at  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly, 
and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Ram- 
pore  Kussia,  passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent 
operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers. 
(Medal  with  clasp.)  Discharged  on  the  6th  of  October,  1863. 

BUNYAN.  Thomas  Bunyan.  Joined  in  April,  1838,  and  became 
sergeant-major  in  October,  1854.  Served  as  sergeant-major 
of  the  regiment  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55, 
including  the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebas- 
topol, assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September, 
and  expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  ^Silver  medal  for 
distinguished  conduct  in  the  field,  medal  with  three  clasps,  and 
Turkish  medal.)  Also  served  throughout  the  Indian  Mutiny 
campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  engagement  at  Secundra- 
gunge, siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  actions  of  Allygunge, 
Rooyah,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  and  the  capture  of 
Mahomdie.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Discharged  in  June,  1859. 
Is  now  chief  warder  of  the  Tower  of  London. 

CAMERON.  John  Cameron.  Joined  on  the  10th  of  August,  1878, 
and  became  colour-sergeant  16th  of  July,  1887.  Served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp, 
and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Nile 
expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 

CHAPMAN.  Francis  Chapman.  Joined  on  the  llth  of  August,  1869, 
and  became  quarter-master-sergeant  1st  of  December,  1883. 
Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of 
1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Wounded. 


294  HISTORICAL  RECORDS  OF  THE 

Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  throughout  the 
Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and 
at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

EWING.  John  Ewing.  Joined  on  the  26th  of  May,  1879,  and 
became  colour-sergeant  in  July,  1886.  Served  with  the  regi- 
ment throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  Also  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of 
1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86. 
vVas  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the 
engagement  at  Giniss. 

FINLAY.  Robert  Finlay.  Joined  on  the  6th  of  July,  1868,  and 
became  pioneer-sergeant  9th  of  March,  1875  ;  canteen  sergeant, 
1885.  Served  with  the  42nd  Black  Watch  in  the  Ashantee 
campaign.  (Medal.)  Served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders 
throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the 
battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Also  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  in  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal  for  long 
service  and  good  conduct. 

FLETCHER.  John  Fletcher.  Joined  on  the  20th  of  April,  1811,  and 
became  sergeant  in  1816.  Served  with  the  79th  in  the  Pen- 
insular war,  and  was  present  at  the  battles  of  the  Pyrenees, 
Nivelle,  Nive  and  Toulouse.  (Silver  medal  with  four  clasps.) 
Also  throughout  the  campaign  in  Holland  in  1815,  being 
present  at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo.  (Waterloo 
medal.)  Discharged  on  the  8th  of  March,  1837.  Died  in 
1872. 

FLETCHER.  William  Forman  Fletcher.  Joined  and  became  armourer- 
sergeant  on  the  9th  of  December,  1847.  Served  with  the 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  295 

regiment  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including 
the  battles  of  Alma  and  Balaclava,  and  the  siege  of  Sebastopol. 
(Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also  throughout 
the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  engage- 
ment at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow,  actions 
of  Allygunge,  Rooyah,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore,  capture  of 
Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  passage  of  the  Gogra 
at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across  the 
Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Died  at  Rawul 
Pindeeon  the  llth  of  April,  1864. 

FLETCHER.  William  Fletcher  (son  of  Armourer-Sergeant  Fletcher). 
Became  cook-sergeant  on  the  8th  of  March,  1876.  Served 
with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  in  1882, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with 
clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  throughout  the  Nile  expe- 
dition of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the  regiment  through- 
out the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in 
1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and 
at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

GRANT.  John  Macgregor  Grant.  Served  as  pipe-major  of  the  regi- 
ment throughout  the  Egyptian  war  of  1882,  and  was  present  at 
the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  medal 
with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Died  of  cholera  on  Mokkattam 
heights  in  July,  1883. 

GUNN.  Donald  Gunn.  Joined  the  79th  in  1808,  and  served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  being  present  at 
the  battles  of  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Salamanca,  Pyrenees,  Nivelle, 
Nive  and  Toulouse,  and  at  the  siege  of  Burgos.  At  the  battle 
of  Toulouse  he  was  three  times  wounded — re-joining  his  com- 
pany twice  after  his  wounds  had  been  dressed.  On  the  third 
occasion  he  was  carried  off  the  field  by  his  wife,  Jean  Gunn, 
whose  courageous  behaviour  in  dressing  the  wounds  of  other 
soldiers  was  especially  taken  notice  of  by  the  Duke  of  Welling- 
ton. Mrs.  Gunn  was  with  the  regiment  with  her  husband  in 


296  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

almost  every  battle  and  engagement  in  which  it  took  part.  She 
lived  to  be  upwards  of  ninety-eight  years  of  age,  and  died  in 
Edinburgh  about  a  year  ago. 

GUNN.  William  Gunn  (son  of  Private  Donald  Gunn).  Became 
sergeant  in  May,  1843.  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout 
the  Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma 
and  Balaclava  and  the  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  three 
clasps,  French  war  medal,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Was  in  poses- 
sion  of  the  silver  medal  for  long  service  and  good  conduct. 
He  was  discharged  in  July,  1857,  and  died  in  July,  1883. 

GUNN.  William  Gunn  (son  of  Sergeant  William  Gunn).  Became 
colour-sergeant  on  the  8th  of  July,  1879.  Served  with  the 
regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches, 
medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 

GUNN.  Donald  Gunn  (grandson  of  Private  Donald  Gunn).  Served 
as  a  sergeant  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Dangerously  wounded. 
Mentioned  in^despatches,  silver  medal  for  distinguished  conduct 
in  the  field,  medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 

HEALY.  Thomas  Healy.  Became  sergeant  on  the  1st  of  March, 
1881.  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  cam- 
paign of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir. 
(Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  with  the  Egyptian 
army  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  as  sergeant-major  of  the  9th  Soudan  battalion  of  the 
Egyptian  army  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh 
during  its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  (Silver 
medal  for  distinguished  conduct  in  the  field.)  Also  at  the 
action  at  Sarras  in  May,  1887.  (Mentioned  in  despatches. 
Five  times  wounded.) 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  297 

HENDERSON.  David  Henderson.  Joined  on  the  llth  of  December, 
1812,  and  served  with  the  79th  in  the  Peninsula,  and  through- 
out the  Waterloo  campaign,  being  present  at  the  battles  of 
Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo. 

HENDERSON.  Thomas  Henderson  (son  of  Private  David  Henderson). 
Sergeant  on  the  20th  of  June,  1850  ;  colour-sergeant,  1st  of 
June,  1852.  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Eastern 
campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma  and 
Balaclava  and  the  siege  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with  three 
clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver 
medal  for  meritorious  service  and  the  silver  medal  for  long 
service  and  good  conduct.  Discharged  on  the  20th  of  January, 
1860.  Served,  after  leaving  the  79th,  for  eighteen  years  with 
the  Royal  Perth  Militia. 

HENDERSON.  David  Henderson  (son  of  Colour-Sergeant  Thomas 
Henderson).  Joined  on  the  3rd  of  June,  1871,  and  became 
colour-sergeant  1st  of  July,  1886.  Served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's 
star.)  Also  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  as  sergeant-major  of  the  British  Camel  Corps  throughout 
the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86, 
and  was  present  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  (Mentioned  in 
general  orders.) 

HEWITT.  Kennedy  Hewitt.  Joined  on  the  6th  of  June,  1876, 
and  became  sergeant -instructor  of  musketry  18th  of  April, 
1887.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian 
campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el- 
Kebir.  (Wounded.  Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 

KNIGHT.  James  Knight.  Joined  on  the  14th  of  February,  1854, 
and  became  colour-sergeant  1st  of  January,  1860 ;  quarter- 
master-sergeant, 15th  of  January,  1867  ;  canteen  steward,  16th 
of  February,  1875.  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma 


298  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

and  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June 
and  the  8th  of  September,  and  the  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale.  (Medal  with  three  clasps,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also 
served  throughout  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858-59, 
including  the  engagement  at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture 
of  Lucknow,  actions  of  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shah- 
jehanpore,  capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Russia, 
passage  of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent  operations  in 
Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 
Served  with  the  79th  in  the  North-west  Frontier  campaign  in 
1863.  (Medal.)  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882.  (Medal  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Also  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  He 
left  the  regiment  in  1885.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal 
for  long  service  and  good  conduct.  Quarter-Master-Sergeant 
Knight  had  the  honour  of  being  presented  to  Her  Majesty  the 
Queen  at  the  ceremony  of  depositing  the  old  colours  of  the 
79th  at  Osborne  House  on  the  22nd  of  April,  1873. 

MACALISTER.  George  Norman  Macalister.  Joined  on  the  24th  of 
November,  1881,  and  became  colour-sergeant  21st  of  March, 
1886.  Served  in  the  campaign  in  the  Eastern  Soudan  in  1884, 
and  was  present  at  the  actions  of  El  Teb  and  Tamaii.  (Medal 
with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Also  in 
the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86. 

MACDONALD.  Donald  Macdonald.  Joined  on  the  13th  of  November, 
1866,  and  became  orderly  room  sergeant  13th  of  April,  1887. 
Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of 
1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal 
with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 

MACDONALD.  Colin  Macdonald.  Was  appointed  ensign  and  town 
major  of  Montreal,  from  sergeant-major,  30th  of  January,  1835. 

MACDONALD.  Alexander  Macdonald.  Was  appointed  cornet  in  the 
Land  Transport  Corps  from  sergeant,  2nd  of  February,  1856. 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  299 

MACKENZIE.  John  Mackenzie.  Joined  on  the  8th  of  August,  1854, 
and  became  sergeant  19th  April,  1855  ;  orderly  room  sergeant. 
8th  of  October,  1858;  paymaster-sergeant,  21st  of  February, 
1870.  Transferred  to  the  Royal  Perth  Rifles  on  the  1st  of 
July,  1875.  Is  now  quarter-master-sergeant  of  the  3rd  battalion 
Royal  Highlanders.  Served  with  the  79th  throughout  the 
Eastern  campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  siege  and  fall  of 
Sebastopol  and  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of 
September.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also 
throughout  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858-59,  including 
the  engagement  at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture  of  Luck- 
now,  actions  of  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore, 
capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  passage 
of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude, 
across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Thanked  by  Colonel 
Taylor,  C.B.,  commanding  the  79th,  for  conspicuous  conduct 
at  Lucknow.  Medal  with  clasp.)  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver 
medal  for  long  service  and  good  conduct.  Quarter-Master- 
Sergeant  Mackenzie  had  the  honour  of  being  presented  to  Her 
Majesty  the  Queen  at  the  ceremony  of  depositing  the  old  colours 
of  the  79th  at  Osborne  House  on  the  22nd  of  April,  1873. 

McCABE.  John  McCabe.  Joined  on  the  14th  of  February,  1879, 
and  became  colour-sergeant  30th  of  April,  1885.  Served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882. 
(Medal  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  throughout  the  Nile  expe- 
dition of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  with  the  regiment  through- 
out the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in 
1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and 
at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

McDAvm.  George  McDavid.  Became  pioneer-sergeant  on  the  1st 
of  April,  1887.  Served  with  the  91st  Highlanders  throughout 
the  Zulu  campaign  of  1879  (medal  and  clasp),  and  with  the 
Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh 
during  its  investment  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss.  (Medal.) 


300  HISTORICAL   RECORDS   OF   THE 

MCDONALD.  William  Mcdonald.  Joined  on  the  27th  of  October,  1876, 
and  became  pipe-major,  2nd  of  August,  1883.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85 
(medal  with  clasp)  and  throughout  the  operations  of  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86.  Was  present  in  Kosheh 
during  its  investment  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

MclNTOSH.  Masterton  Mclntosh.  Joined  the  regiment  from  the 
Inverness  Fencible  Highlanders  on  the  1st  of  November,  1799. 
He  accompanied  the  regiment  to  Egypt  in  1801,  and  was  present 
at  the  battle  before  Alexandria.  He  served  with  the  79th 
throughout  the  Peninsular  war,  being  brought  favourably  to  the 
notice  of  Lord  Wellington  for  his  bravery  at  the  storming  of 
Burgos.  He  served  as  sergeant-major  of  the  regiment  through- 
out the  campaign  of  1815,  being  present  at  the  battles  of 
Quatre  Bras  and  Waterloo. 

MclNTOSH.  Donald  Mclntosh.  Served  with  the  79th  as  a  sergeant 
in  the  Peninsular  war,  and  was  promoted  to  a  commission  in  the 
88th  regiment  for  his  conspicuous  bravery  at  the  battle  of 
Fuentes  d'Onor. 

MclNTYRE.  Duncan  Mclntyre.  Was  appointed  quarter-master  in 
the  Land  Transport  Corps  from  quarter-master-sergeant,  3rd  of 
March,  1856. 

MCKENZIE.  Donald  McKenzie.  Served  as  a  sergeant  with  the 
regiment  in  the  Peninsula,  and  was  recommended  for  a 
commission  by  Lord  Wellington  for  his  bravery  at  the  storming 
of  Burgos,  where  he  was  dangerously  wounded. 

MCKENZIE.  John  McKenzie.  Served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Wal- 
cheren  expedition  in  1809.  Served  throughout  the  Peninsular 
war  with  the  79th,  being  present  at  the  attack  on  Cadiz,  battles 
of  Busaco,  Foz  d'Aronce,  Fuentes  d'Onor,  Salamanca,  Pyrenees, 
Nivelle,  Nive,  and  Toulouse.  He  was  promoted  to  corporal  for 
his  bravery  at  the  battle  of  the  Pyrenees,  He  volunteered  for 
the  "  Forlorn  Hope  "  in  the  projected  attack  on  the  French 


79TH   CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  301 

position  at  Trocadero  on  the  16th  of  March,  1810.  He  again 
volunteered  for  the  "  Forlorn  Hope  "  at  the  storming  of  Burgos, 
and  was  actually  the  first  man  to  enter  the  horn-work,  being 
lifted  over  the  palisades  by  Sergeant  Masterton  Mclntosh  of  the 
79th.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  campaign 
in  Holland  in  1815,  being  present  at  the  battles  of  Quatre  Bras 
and  Waterloo.  He  received  a  bayonet  wound  through  his  left 
arm  at  the  storming  of  Burgos,  a  bullet  in  his  ancle  at  the  battle 
of  Toulouse,  and  at  Waterloo  he  was  bayoneted  in  the  thigh 
and  received  a  severe  contusion  on  the  right  shoulder  from  a 
piece  of  a  shell,  which  tore  the  wing  off  his  jacket.  He  left 
the  regiment  in  Canada. 

McLAGGAN.  Robert  McLaggan.  Joined  on  the  22nd  of  September, 
1875,  colour-sergeant,  20th  of  April,  1885;  paymaster-sergeant, 
10th  of  July,  1887.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served 
with  the  regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  in  Kosheh  during 
its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

MCLAREN.  John  McLaren.  Colour-sergeant  on  the  9th  of  May,  1877. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign 
of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Men- 
tioned in  despatches,  medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 
Also  served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal  for  long  service  and  good 
conduct. 

MCMURRAY.  Alexander  McMurray.  Joined  on  the  18th  of  February, 
1876,  and  became  drum-major,  12th  of  June,  1884.  He 
served  with  the  regiment  in  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882, 
from  the  landing  at  Ismailia,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served 


302  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF    THE 

with  the  regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  in  Kosheh  during 
its  investment,  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

McNEiL.  James  McNeil.  Joined  on  the  9th  of  February,  1875,  and 
became  colour-sergeant,  12th  of  July,  1882.  He  served  with 
the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and 
was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in 
despatches,  medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also 
throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served 
with  the  regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan 
Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86,  was  present  in  Kosheh  during 
its  investment,  at  the  reconnaissance  on  the  16th  of  December, 
and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

McPHERSON.  Alexander  McPherson.  Joined  on  the  31st  of  July, 
1840,  and  became  sergeant,  31st  of  May,  1854.  He  served, 
attached  to  the  light  cavalry  brigade,  throughout  the  Eastern 
campaign  of  1854-55,  including  the  battles  of  Alma,  Balaclava, 
Inkerman,  and  the  siege  and  fall  of  Sebastopol.  (Medal  with 
four  clasps  and  Turkish  medal.)  He  served  with  the  79th 
throughout  the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858-59,  including 
the  engagement  at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow, 
actions  at  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore, 
capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  passage  of 
the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude,  across 
the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Discharged, 
4th  of  October,  1864.  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal  for 
long  service  and  good  conduct.  Is  now  burgh  officer  for  Paisley 
and  sheriff  officer  for  Renfrewshire. 

MESSENGER.  Henry  C.  Messenger.  Appointed  armourer-sergeant 
on  the  3rd  of  July,  1882.  Served  with  the  regiment  through- 
out the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Medal  and  Clasp.)  Also 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  charge  of  machine  guns.  Was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its 
investment  (slightly  wounded)  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 


79lTI    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  303 

MORTON.  James  Morton.  Became  colour-sergeant  on  the  7th  of 
April,  1880.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel- 
el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Also  through- 
out the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Served  throughout 
the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86, 
was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  and  at  the 
engagement  at  Giniss. 

NEWELL.  John  Newell.  Became  colour-sergeant  on  the  17th  of 
March,  1874 ;  afterwards  quarter-master-sergeant,  and  now 
canteen  steward,  at  the  depot  at  Inverness.  He  served  with  the 
regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was 
present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir,  (Mentioned  in  despatches, 
medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.)  Is  in  possession  of  the 
silver  medal  for  long  service  and  good  conduct. 

RANKIN.  Robert  Rankin.  Joined  on  the  10th  of  March,  1854 ; 
colour-sergeant,  9th  of  May,  1863  ;  sergeant-major,  16th  of 
March,  1867.  Died  at  Kamptee  on  the  17th  of  March,  1871. 
He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Eastern  campaign  of 
1854-55,'including  the  battle  of  Balaclava,  siege  of  Sebastopol, 
assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and  the  8th  of  September,  and 
expedition  to  Kertch  and  Yenikale.  (Medal  with  two  clasps 
and  Turkish  medal.)  Also  served  with  the  79th  throughout 
the  Indian  Mutiny  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the  engage- 
ment at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow, 
actions  of  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore, 
capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  passage 
of  the  Gogra  at  Fyzabad,  and  subsequent  operations  in  Oude, 
across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee  rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.) 
Served  in  the  North  West  Frontier  campaign  against  the 
Mohmunds  in  1863.  (Entitled  to  a  medal.) 

ROBERTSON.  John  Robertson.  Became  master  tailor  on  the  29th 
of  October,  1876.  Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882.  (Medal  and  Khedive's  star.) 


304  HISTORICAL    RECORDS    OF   THE 

Also  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.) 
Served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the  operations  of  the 
Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86.  Was  present  in 
Kosheh  during  its  investment  and  at  the  engagement  at  Giniss. 

Ross.  William  J.  Ross.  Joined  on  the  6th  of  April,  1874,  and 
became  colour-sergeant  15th  of  September,  1885.  He  served 
with  the  regiment  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882, 
and  was  present  at  the  battle  of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with 
clasp  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  throughout  the  Nile  expe- 
dition of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86  ;  was  present  in  Kosheh  during  its  investment,  at 
the  reconnaissance  on  the  16th  of  December,  and  at  the  engage- 
ment at  Giniss. 

SMITH.  Peter  Smith.  Joined  on  the  28th  of  June,  1854,  and 
became  colour-sergeant  12th  of  April,  1861.  Served  with  the 
regiment  during  the  Eastern  campaign  of  1855,  and  was  present 
at  the  siege  of  Sebastopol,  assaults  of  the  18th  of  June  and 
the  8th  of  September,  and  the  expedition  to  Kertch  and 
Yenikale.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Turkish  medal.)  Also  served 
throughout  the  Indian  campaign  of  1858-59,  including  the 
engagement  at  Secundragunge,  siege  and  capture  of  Lucknow, 
actions  of  Rooyah,  Allygunge,  Bareilly,  and  Shahjehanpore, 
capture  of  Mahomdie,  storming  of  Rampore  Kussia,  and  sub- 
sequent operations  in  Oude,  across  the  Gogra  and  Raptee 
rivers.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Is  in  possession  of  the  silver  medal 
for  long  service  and  good  conduct.  He  was  discharged  on  the 
31st  of  August,  1875,  and  is  now  employed  as  an  overseer  at 
the  Forth  bridge  works. 

SWEENEY.  James  Sweeney.  Joined  the  regiment  on  the  2nd  of 
November,  1869,  and  became  paymaster-sergeant  on  the  9th  of 
March,  1875;  staff  clerk,  6th  of  July,  1887.  He  served, 
attached  to  the  Black  Watch,  throughout  the  Ashantee  cam- 
paign of  1873,  including  the  battle  of  Amoaful,  capture  and 


79TH    CAMERON    HIGHLANDERS.  305 

destruction  of  Becquah,  battle  of  Ordahsu,  and  capture  gf 
Coomassie.  (Medal  with  clasp.)  Served  with  the  Cameron 
Highlanders  throughout  the  Egyptian  campaign  of  1882. 
(Medal  and  Khedive's  star.)  Served  throughout  the  Nile 
expedition  of  1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment 
throughout  the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force 
in  1885-86. 

SYME.  Stephen  Syme.  Joined  the  regiment  on  the  1st  of  September, 
1877,  from  the  42nd  Black  Watch,  and  became  sergeant  on 
the  15th  of  May,  1883.  Served  with  the  Blach  Watch 
throughout  the  Ashantee  campaign  of  1873,  including  the 
battle  of  Amoaful,  capture  and  destruction  of  Becquah,  battle 
of  Ordahsu,  and  capture  of  Coomassie.  (Medal  and  clasp.) 
He  served  with  the  Cameron  Highlanders  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle  of 
Tel-el-Kebir.  (Mentioned  in  despatches,  appointed  lance- 
sergeant  for  conspicuous  gallantry,  medal  with  clasp,  and 
Khedive's  star.)  Served  throughout  the  Nile  expedition  of 
1884-85.  (Clasp.)  Also  served  with  the  regiment  throughout 
the  operations  of  the  Soudan  Frontier  Field  Force  in  1885-86. 
Was  present  at  Kosheh  during  its  investment  and  at  the 
engagement  at  Giniss. 

TEMPLEMAN.  Thomas  Templeman.  Joined  in  1873;  colour- 
sergeant,  1st  of  August,  1882.  Is  now  quarter-master-sergeant 
at  the  depot.  He  served  with  the  regiment  throughout  the 
Egyptian  campaign  of  1882,  and  was  present  at  the  battle 
of  Tel-el-Kebir.  (Medal  with  clasp,  and  Khedive's  star.) 


\v 


APPENDIX. 


Roll  of  officers,  non-commissioned  officers,  and  men  who  were 
killed  in  action  or  died  of  wounds  or  disease  in  Egypt  and  the 
Soudan,  1882-87. 


Sergeant       William  MoPherson      ...         Died  at  Ismailia 

Private         Alexander  Denniston         Killed  at  Tel-el-Kebir 

„  George  Rugg     ...  ,.  „ 

JohnHyslop 
William  Simon 
„  George  Crawford    ...         ...         ...         ...  ,.  „ 

,  Patrick  Kenny  ..  ...  .  ...         ...  .,  „ 

„  Thomas  King          ...         ...          ...         ...  ,,  ,, 

„  Donald  Cameron  ...         ...         ...          ...  .,  „ 

„  Robert  Browii          ..         ...         ...         ...  „  „ 

,,  William  Smith  

„  James  Pollock         ...         ...         ...         ...  ,,  ,, 

„  Alexander  Patterson    ...         ...         ...         ...  .,  ,, 

„  William  Bodel         „  „ 

Corporal       William  Cattanach       ...         ...         ...         ..      Died  of  wounds 

Private          David  Murray         ...          ...          ...         ...  ,,  ,, 

„  Alexander  Murray        ...         ...         ...          ...         „  „ 

r  William  McKenzie ...         ...         ...         ...  ,,  ., 

„  Duncan  McLeod  ...          ...         ...         ...     Died  at  Cairo 

,,  James  Ireland         ...         ...         ...         ...  „  ,, 

.,  William  Semple  ...         ...  ..         ...         „  ,, 

„  David  Urquhart      ...         ...          ...         ...  ,,  ., 

„  David  Thow      „  , 

Thomas  McCabe      ... „ 

John  Reeves      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         .,  ., 

Michael  Dodd 


308 


APPENDIX. 


Private 


Lance-  \ 
Corporal  J 

Private 


Pipe-Major 
Private 


Corporal 
Private 


Colour-  \ 
Sergeant  / 

» 
Private 


Lieutenant 
Private 


Piper 

Captain 

Private 


William  Robertson 
Michael  Naughton  ... 

William  Brown 

James  Wilson 

Robert  Glen      

John  Smith 
James  Cameron 
Thomas  Dodds 
Michael  Carrigan 
William  Morrison    .. 
Hugh  McKay    ... 
John  Macgregor  Grant 
John  Grant 

Robert  McRae         

John  McLaggan 
James  Bridge 
Charles  Roberts 

William  Gow  

John  Hamilton 

Robert  Mills  

Gregor  Cattanach 
Donald  McGillivray 
Donald  McKenzie 

William  Hatch        

Andrew  McEwen  Gray 

John  Wells 

James  Trimble 

Thomas  Gollan        

William  Cawte 
Thomas  Farrington 
William  Gordon  Cameron 
David  McKenzie     ... 
John  Kennedy 
John  McLaren 
David  Hogg 
Alexander  McDonald 
Wedderburn  Con  way  Halkett. 
Joseph  Stevenson    ... 
Alexander  McLeod 
Alexander  Addie 
John  McGregor 


Died  at  Cairo 

Invalided  ;  died  on  passage  home 

)>  >j  >• 

Died  at  Cairo 


Died  of  cholera 


Died  at  Cairo 

:>  » 

Invalided  ;  died  in  England 

)>  »  » 

Died  at  Cairo 
Died  at  Assioot 
Died  at  Alexandria 

j>  » 

Died  at  Korosko 


Died  at  Wady  Haifa 
Died  at  Alexandria 
Died  of  wounds 


Killed  at  Kosheh 


Died  at  Kosheh 
Invalided  ;  died  in  England 
Died  of  wounds 
Died  at  Wady  Haifa 


Private 

Lance-  1 
Sergeant  f 

Private 

» 

Drummer 
Private 


Lance-  \ 
Corporal  / 

Sergeant 

Corporal 

Private 

Boy 

Private 


John  Bennet     ... 
Arthur  Hartley 

Charles  Murray 
William  Davidson 
Thomas  Clelland 
John  Qagan 
William  Pridgeon 
William  Robinson 
James  McLeod 
Henry  Hall 
William  Elliot  ... 
Hugh  Craig 
James  Slater 
James  Kennedy 

Walter  Smith    ... 

James  Guthrie 
James  Douglas ... 
Alexander  Kelly 
William  Rolls    ... 
James  McCourt 

Peter  Queen 
William  Maben 


APPENDIX.  309 
Died  at  Wady  Haifa 


Drowned  at  Kostamneh,  Upper  Nile 
Died  at  Assioot 
Killed  by  a  fall  from  a  train 
Died  at  Assouan 

Died  at  Cairo 


(Killed  by  a  fall  from  a  train  at 
\         Boulac  Dacroor 

Died  at  Cairo. 


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